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Full text of "Schenectady County, New York : its history to the close of the nineteenth century"

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REYNOLDS HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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SCHENECTADY COUNTY 

NEW YORK / 

ITS HISTORY TO THE CLOSE 

OF THE 

NINETEENTH CENTURY 



HISTORIAN AND EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Hon. AUSTIN A. YATES 

COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW 

LATE DISTRICT ATTORNEY AND COUNTY JUDGE OF SCHENECTADY COUN'l'Y 

ATTORNEY TO THE STATE INSURANCE DEPARTMENI' ; MEMBER OF 

ASSEMBLY; MAJOR IN THE VOLUNTEER FORCES OF THE UNITED 

STATES DURING THE WAR OF THE REBELLION AND 

SPANISH AMERICAN-WAR. 



Men who their duties know, 

But know their rights, and. knowin.e;-, dare maintain. 

Prevent the long-aimed blow, 

And crush the tyrant while they rend the chain; 

These constitute a state. 



PUBLISHED BY 

THE NEW YORK HISTORY COMPANY 
1902 



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1575686 



INTRODUCTORY. 



This story of Schenectady is very little more than a compilation 
of the work of other archival authors. It could not well be other- 
wise. The annals of the historic old county have been wonderfully 
preserved, comparatively easy of access, through the work of former 
writers, who have exhibited remarkable industry, and in some in- 
stances, the most thorough erudition. Giles F. Yates, writing under 
the non-de-plume of the "Antiquarian," in the Schenectady J^e/^ec^or, 
of which he was editor in the '30's, gathered some charmingly interest- 
ing bits of history, tradition and romance. They are like pretty vistas 
in the scenery of the by-gone, but, they were, as they were only intended, 
to be, material for the local columns of his paper in a city, that, in 
those days, taxed ingenuity and often imagination, to find anything 
local to write about. This matter was incidentally connected with 
the history of the bloody wars of Frontenac, and with the complica- 
tions of New Netherland politics, which were about as bad as those 
of Manhattan are now. The awful devastations of the French and 
Indian wars, in the little frontier post, hamlet, village and city, are 
well and sadly known. But all that was known was scattered and 
fragmentary, made up of paragraphs and items in the school books 
of elementary history, in which the city had always a fleeting prom- 
inence, owing to its long, and to unpracticed tongues, its unpro- 
nounceable names, a schoolboy terror in its orthography, a strain on 
the music of speech with the blood-curdling picture of the "Burning 
of Schenectady in 1690," over every mantel-piece; full of thrilling 
story, as is almost every city street, country road, and acre of Old 
Dorp, Niskayuna and Rotterdam, its people have seemed, until 
the latter half of the last century, abundantly content with 
legend and tradition. 



iv INTRODUCTORY. 

We have no Dutch Heroditus or Livy, Thiicydides or Pliny to 
preserve for the coming generations, heroes, martyrs and statesmen 
of one of the most historic localities of New York state. The edu- 
cated immigrant, or the comparative stranger within our gates of 
sufficient culture to thoroughly appreciate and enjoy the quaint folk 
talk of the valley, the rapidly disappearing old gabled architecture, 
and the grand record of the brave and resolute Dutchmen of Colo- 
nial and revolutionary days. He is invariably attracted by the abun- 
dant material for history, romantic and thrilling, and of the abun- 
dance of solid truth for strange fiction. The old Mohawkers were 
content to hear and repeat the jumble of tradition and history, fact 
and fancy, recitals of the actual occurrences that filtered through the 
song and story of the generations, to whom it was a serious and 
often an appalling reality. The oft-told tale was well enough known, 
often enough repeated by the oldest inhabitant, present in a commu- 
nity that rarely ever travelled, to satisfy all the historic needs of the 
valley. 

There were enough to lift their voices for the local audiences that 
cared to listen to the story that began in the nursery. There seemed 
to have been no local genius, interested, ambitious or industrious 
enough to come down to business with the pen of a serious, pains- 
taking and accurate historian. Yates did much to charm the para- 
graph reader of the newspaper. The Hon. John Saunders, a de- 
scendant of a grand old family, a graduate of Union, a most inter- 
esting writer, has, in his "Early Settlers of Schenectady," indulged 
himself and delighted his readers with patriarchal reveries of the 
early days of the last century, authentic tradition, handed down to him 
from the frontier Glens, that is of absorbing interest to a race of 
Holland blood and language that is fast passing away. The Judge 
never pretended to be a historian, was only, in fact, a most delight- 
ful narrator of fireside story, and family lineage, and as such his 
work is invaluable. 

So it is to the comparatively new importation of industrious brain 
that we owe the preservation of the history of this old county. 

The more than twice told tale, somewhat tedious to the old resi- 
dent, has the charm of novelty to the cultivated gentleman, who 



INTRODUCTORY. v 

enters afresh upon the valley as rich in reminiscence as it is rare in 
the beanty of its scenery. 

Pierson, the historic pioneer in the family annals of Albany and 
Schenectady, became deeply interested in the lives and work of the 
now famons men who formed a town to fight heroically in its 
defense, and to perish in its ashes or survive to send out into a great 
state the names of men who, in pnlpit, and law courts, and on bat- 
tlefields for King and Colony, have contributed splendidly to the 
renown of the foremost state of the Union. 

Jonathan Pierson was a wonder. His industry and power of 
research were remarkable. A professor of chemistry in Union Col- 
lege, knowing and teaching all that was known or could be taught. 
He was treasurer and secretary of its Board of Trustees. One who 
follows him on his journey through the musty records of Ancient 
Churches, the old Paris and English Documents of the State Library, 
and sees the evidence of his tremendous labor, strewn all along the 
pathway of his toilsome journey, wonders how or when he found 
the time to do the work that looks like the achievement of a life- 
time of indefatigable industry. Schenectady, one of the most pro- 
gressive cities in the state to-day, owes Pierson a debt of gratitude, as 
the world owes the patient and tireless men who have disentombed 
the ancient towns from the burial of Vesuvius. 

Following Pierson, came his heavy debtors, Sanders and McMur- 
ray. Of the charming idyls of the one, the only one to the manor 
born, we have already spoken. McMurray, an army officer and a 
military instructor at Union, has rendered us infinite service in the 
form of the most comprehensive work, the most complete History of 
Schenectady yet written. There is much that is new in his discov- 
eries, all is certainly valuable. 

The Hon. Judson S. Landon has yielded to the fascination of the 
place and theme, and has brought to elucidation the strange situation 
which seems to have made Schenectady the battle ground of the 
French and English. It has produced traditions born of the solid 
learning of the historian. His article in Putman's publication of 
" Historic Cities," and his paper " Why Schenectady was Burned in 
1690," lets in a flood of light on the historic causes of the city's 



vi INTRODUCTORY. 

origin, its sad youth, and its national prominence in Colonial and 
foreign wars. 

Dr. William Elliot Griffes, while pastor of the First Reformed 
Church, immediately acknowledged the charm of the association of 
Schenectady, with much that was heroic in the characters of the 
Holland burgher. In the pulpit and on the platform, and in the 
literary world in which he has recently taken such eminent rank, he 
has heralded the grand tolerance of that Church of Holland, often a 
martyr, never a bigot or persecutor or that has tortured or killed for 
opinion's sake. Through the whole land he has proclaimed the 
heroism and bravery of the burgher who never quailed before the 
enemy of his faith, and who united with his valor a forbearance and 
magnanimity that won the love and the confidence of his Indian foe 
or neighbor. 

Men born on heights which shadow the picturesque or pastoral 
beauty of the world's scenery, may not cease to admire, but become 
so used to the panorama that they cease to note it. The scenery 
along the valley of the Mohawk in the kaleidescope color of Autumn 
foliage, startled Henry Ward Beecher into expressions of rapture, 
and as he crossed " The Street of the Martyrs " in a palace car, 
passed in sight of the Buykendahl, the scene of the massacre of 
1748 under Towereune, where the valley narrows into the highway 
of nations, passed by the stone mansions of Guy and Sir John 
Johnson, by the shrine of " Our Lady of Martyrs," consecrated to 
the memory of that heroic Jesuit Missionary martyr, Father Jogues, 
the homestead of the patriot Fondas, Oriskany, and the monument 
to Herkimer and Fort Stanwix, where St. Leger was held back till 
Burgoyne was whipped at Saratoga. The great divine thrilled with 
the recollection of all he had read and heard of the land of story 
and song. 

Now, we of this day, long used to the journey, rtish through all 
this avenue of scenic beauty, with a pipe in the smoking car, or a 
book in the day coach, too familiar with the sights of the great 
valley to glance out of the window. 

Years ago, on the "Role Baum," that overlooks the precipices of 
the Plant, and towers above Youta Pusha, the hill that from Union 



INTRODUCTORY. vii 

College looks like the iron clad prow of a battle ship, with a group 
of under graduates, the writer looked down on a scene of pastoral 
beauty, that swept over a score of cities and villages, and over the 
hill tops and mountain peaks of four states. Turning to the farmer 
living in the stone house, from whose windows all the streets in 
Schenectady can be traced, and where with a strong glass, time can 
be read on the clock of the Reformed Church, we expressed our 
envy of his mountain home. He was a bright man, far from a dul- 
lard, but there was no answering enthusiasm, for without looking up 
he stolidly followed his plow with a listless acquiescence in his re- 
mark, "Yes, folks say it is a sightly place, but I'm so used to it I 
don't notice it any more," and he kept his eye in the furrow, that 
produced his bread and butter. The artistic element in his nature, 
if he had any, had been exhausted long ago. There was nothing 
left but the practically bucolic. 

So we old Mohawkers have lived on the site, and amid the scenes 
of one of the most legendary valleys on earth, and have heard it all, 
seen it all, from childhood. It is the immigrant that becomes our 
novelist for it is all charmingly new to him. 

We Dutchmen of old, from old Peter Stuyvesant down, abhorred the 
Yankee, and the prejudice of the Mohawk Dutchman was the most 
stolid of them all. The repulsion was natural, not entirely unreason- 
able. The New Engandler was smart, the burgher was only honest. 
Jonathan said that Clausha was either asleep, or not good for any- 
thing, after 4 p. m., of any day. Clausha retorted that it must have 
been in the dewey eve when the Yankee sold him wooden hams, and 
condemned shoe pegs sharpened at the other end for oats. 

The restless eagerness of the Down Easter disturbed the taciturn 
Hollander who, secure in the conviction of his own honesty and that 
of his old neighbors, distrusted that glibness to which his race fell 
easy victims. In olden time the interloper was received because he 
could not be kept away, but his probation was long before he met a 
warm welcome by the Dutchman's fireside. 

All is not only changed now, but we have become debtors to those 
who more than a generation ago were strangers inside the old 
barricade. It is not the descendant of the old Roman who is un- 



viii INTRODUCTORY. 

earthing- the buried splendors of Pompeii, but the men of learning 
from other lands. The Yankee horde is upon us, overflowing us, 
but it is a welcome throng. They bring trade, business and pros- 
perity with an electric touch. 

More than all, they have brought a learning and culture no greater 
than that which we had in the old time, but so impressive with his- 
toric surroundings, but they have been impelled to write, and write 
with recorded accuracy and charming enthusiasm. 

History was made here by Bradts, Schermerhorns, Swarts, Vielies, 
Bankers, Tellers, Yates, Van Slycks, and all the great army of Van 
unpronouncables, and their heroism and adventures gave the Ancient 
City its renown. But Pierson and McMurray, Griffes and Landon, 
are the record savers of the old days. To these industrious, able and 
erudite chroniclers the writer owes lasting obligation, for without 
their work, this vista, cut out of the great picture, could not have 
been put in its modest frame. 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: 

ITS HISTORY TO THE CLOSE OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. 



CHAPTER L 



The Founding of The City. 

The Mohawk was the most n.agiiificent specimen of an Indian 
that America prodnced. As far back as tradition and history oro, this 
tribe was easily the master of all that surrounded it. Their domain 
extended through the whole length of the Mohawk Valley, the 
Northern and Western part of New York, and a portion of North- 
western Pennsylvania. The bravest, the brightest, the most eloquent, 
warlike and cruel, of all Indian organizations, they were yet the 
only nation that ever became the white man's steady, firm and faith- 
ful friend. Their names, as Christian communicants, are on the 
records of the Reformed Church. The bodies of their dead, until 
scattered by the march of sanitary science in the laying of water, 
sewer and gas pipes, lay under our feet. Their blood flows in the 
veins of all descendants of the Van Slycks, the Bradts, the Vielies 
and of Jonathan Stevens. 

Along the Mohawk they had five castles, one named Minemial, 
after one of their chiefs, and situated on an island at the mouth of 
the Mohawk, below Cohoes, one at Schenectady, one at the outlet of 
Schoharie Creek, now called Fort Hunter, one at Chaughnawaga, 
and one called Canajoharie, in the town of Danube, Herkimer 
County. 

After the settlement of Schenectady and the apportionment of the 



2 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

lands among fifteen original proprietors, no bnrials were made within 
the qnadrangle bounded by Ferry, State, Washington avenue and 
Front streets. The number of Indian skulls, tomahawks, and sav- 
age implements, exhumed in past years, show conclusively that, be- 
fore the white man came, there was a populous settlement of red 
men on the spot now covered by the city. 

Less than twenty-five years ago, a lad living at No. 26 Front, fired 
with emulation by the finding of skulls and bones by a comrade, 
went out under the big tree, yet standing there, to dig for Indians. 
The derisive smiles which followed him in his quest, were changed 
to expressions of astonishment as he turned a wonderfully preserved 
skeleton, facing the east, with tomahawk and arrow heads beside the 
bones. Subsequently, on digging for sewerage, skulls and bones 
enough to stock a small cemetery, were tossed by every spadeful. 

There are other evidences of Indian occupation. An ancient path 
coming from the direction of Niskayuna, once wound around the 
brow of the hills that but a half century ago, battlemented the east- 
ern half of the town. Traces of it may yet be seen across the front 
of Prospect Hill, curving around southeasterly towards the cemetery 
enclosure. 

Previous to the coming of the white man the valley from Free- 
man's Bridge to Rotterdam Junction was cultivated by the Mohawks 
and in harvest time was fairly gilded with the tassels of Indian corn. 

The locality was called by every possible variation of pronuncia- 
tion of the name that has at last settled down into Schenectady. 
It was a well known spot. The great flats of Rotterdam from Centre 
street to beyond the first lock west of the city, was known as Scho- 
nowe. Van Corlear, in 1643, describes the whole territory' as that 
Schoonste, "loveliest land that the eyes of man ever beheld." The 
name the county now bears is said to have a beautiful origin, Sclioon 
(beautiful) Acten (valuable) deel (portion of land,) making the 
sound Schoon Acten deel, changed and twisted by the different Na- 
tionalities that have been busy with the name. But this pretty deriv- 
ation is only conjecture. The name in ancient papers and records is 
spelled seventy-nine different ways, but all the orthography with its 
marvellous combination of letters produced the sound of Schenec- 




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FOUNDING OF THE CITY. 3 

tady. Governor Stuyvesant wrote it as we spell it now as early as 
1663, two years after the original patent. The name is undoubtedly 
of Mohawk Indian origin and belonged originally to the land lying 
around Albany. Four years after the charter, it settled down from 
Corlear, as the settlement was originally called, to Schenectady. 

White men well knew the spot in 1642. Van Curlear, returning 
from one of his errands of mercy to the Mohawks, who listened and 
heeded him because they loved him, wrote to the Patroon Killian 
Van Rensselaer, "that a half day's journey from the Colonic, Town 
of Albany, on the Mohawk River, there lies the most beautiful land 
that the eye of man ever beheld." Any man who has stood on 
Youta Pusha Berg, Prospect Hill, over Landon Terrace, or Schuyler- 
berg, midway between the Troy and Albany turnpike, east of Bran- 
dywine avenue, cannot fail to understand the rapture of the Dutch- 
man. 

In the forties one could easily understand what was the lay of the 
land when it was said to be the Mohawk Village of Connochaiegu- 
harie. The name was an Indian description of the great masses of 
floodwood which were left every Spring on the flats. The deposit 
was then as now, often immense, but the name is comprehensive 
enough to include the whole pile. 

Major McMurray has described its ancient appearances. The old 
township of Schenectady embraced a territory of 128 square miles, 
a portion of the Mohawk valley, sixteen miles long and eight miles 
wide. The western half is an irregular plateau elevated 400 or 500 
feet above the Mohawk, a spur of the Helderberg, passing north 
into Saratoga County. The eastern half is a sandy plain, whose 
general level is 300 or 400 feet lower. The river, running through 
the middle of this tract, in a southeasterly direction, forms the most 
beautiful and striking natural object in its landscape. At the 
westerly boundary where it enters the town, it flows through a nar- 
row valley, whose sides though covered with foliage, are too steep 
for cultivation. From the hill ." Towereune," the valley widens 
gradually to Poversen and Maalwyck, where the hills sink down 
into the great sand plain. Until the river reaches the city of 
Schenectady, it is a constant succession of rapids, and its general 



4 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

course is soulheast. Here it makes a great bend, and flows with a 
deep sluggish current northeastward to the Aal Plaats, the eastern 
boundary of the town. The tributaries of the Mohawk within the 
town are small and unimj)ortant streams ; those at the west end flow- 
ing from the slates, are nearly or quite dry in summer, while those 
at the opposite end, fed from the sand, are constant spring brooks. 
On the north side of the river are the following brooks : Chuckte- 
nunda, (stone houses) at Towereune, and coming east in succession 
are Van Eps Kil, Droyberg, Verf, or color (paint) creek, called by 
the natives Tequatsera, Jan Mebie's Kil, Creek of the lake in Scotia, 
Cromme Kil and Aal Plaats Kil. On the south side are Zandige 
Kil, the sloot, Right Brugse Kil, Plaats Kil, Poenties Kil, William 
Tellers. Killetie, Zand Kil, Coehorn Kil and Symon Groots Kill. 
But of these streams, few are of sufficient size and constancy now to 
serve as motor power. 

With the exception of a little limestone in the extreme western 
limits of the town, all the rocks found in place, belong to Hudson 
shales and consist of alternate layers of blue slate and sandstones, 
some of which are used for building purposes. 

In the west half this geological formation is most abundant, and 
the soil there is a clayey loam, underlaid with clay or hard pan. The 
immediate valley of the river where it breaks through the range of 
hills is narrow, and is composed chiefly of drifts of at least two 
elevations. The highest called the " stone flats," raised twenty to 
thirty feet above the water, consists of coarse gravel and boulders, 
and is chiefly found on the north side of the river. The opposite 
bank is " lower plain of sand and gravel.-' 

The eastern half of the town has no hills worthy of the name; its 
general level perhaps loo feet above the IMohawk, and the prevailing 
soil is a fine sand, underlaid with clay except in the extreme easterly 
limits where the clay loam again prevails. 

Besides this there is found in the bends and eddies of the river, 
and upon the low islands, an alluvial deposit which is constantly 
enriched by the annual floods. This constitutes the widely known 
" Mohawk Flats," which though cultivated by the white man for 
more than 200 years, have lost little of their unsurpassed fertility. 



EARLY SETTLEMENTS. 5 

In the early period of the settlement no other land was tilled. 
Hence they called the land arable land, or bonwlandt, all else being 
denominated woodland and little valued. In addition to their fertil- 
ity, these flats presented another advantage to the first settler — they 
were mainly free from wood and ready for the plough and seed. 
For ages they had been the native's corn land, while the adjacent 
forest furnished him with flesh and the river with fish. 

The great sand belt which passes across the town south to north, 
was once covered with a heavy growth of pines, while the high lands 
lying north and west of it produced the usual varieties of hard 
woods. Nothing could have been more charming to the eye of the 
first white men traveling up the Mohawk to Fort Hunter, than the 
flats skirting the river banks, clothed in bright green of the Indian 
corn and other summer crops of the red men. 

The site of the village of Schenectady was admirably chosen. 
No other spot in the neighborhood of the bonwlandt offered such 
facilities for a village. From the eastern end of the " Great Flat " 
there makes out from the sandy bluff which surrounds it a low 
narrow spit, lying upon the east, north and west sides the Mohawk 
river and Sand Kil. The extreme point, only about 1,200 feet wide, 
was chosen for the site of the future city — a warm dry spot, easily 
fortified against an enemy and sufficiently elevated to be safe from 
the annual overflow of the Mohawk river. This little flat contains 
but 175 acres, and it was the site of an earlier Indian village. 
Tradition has it that it was a former seat or capital of the Mohawks, 
whose numerous dead have been, from time to time, found buried 
along the Benne Kil. 

If we may believe tradition, Schenectady had already been occu- 
pied by the white man many years when Van Curler first visited it 
in 1642. In fact it has been claimed to be little if any younger than 
Albany. 

That a few fur traders and bosloopers early roved among the 
Mohawks, married and raised families of half-breeds, cannot be 
denied ; indeed there are respectable families in the valley to this 
day, whose pedigree may be traced back to these marriages. But 



6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

that the white man made any permanent settlement on the Mohawk 
west of Albany before 1662, there is no good reason for believing and, 
in view of the opposition of Albany and the Colony, improbable. 

In the snmmer of 1661 Arent Van Cnrler, the leader of the first 
settlement, made formal application to Governor Stnyvesant for per- 
mission to settle npon the " Great Flat " lyiiig west of Schenectady. 

The fonndation and establishment of Schenectady is almost uni- 
versally credited to Arent Van Curler, indeed it was at first known 
as Curlear. He was only one of the founders, however. He never 
lived there, had no hand in the establishment of the early govern- 
ment of the hamlet, or in its subsequent development. But he was 
the man who obtained the original patent, and who had a long and 
discouraging battle before he secured it from the cautious Stnyve- 
sant. 

Nor was he the first white man to appreciate the natural advan- 
tage of the place. The evidence of Bible entries, corroborating 
tradition, shows that Jacque Cornelise Van Slyck, (the half-breed son 
of Cornelise Van Slyck and his wife, a Mohawk chieftian's daugh- 
ter) also Alexander Lindsay, Glen and John Teller, a nephew of 
Glen's wife, were here as early as 1658. Cornelise Antonise Van 
Slyck, father of Jacque Cornelise, married Alstock at Mohawk 
Castle, was adopted into the tribe, and was known, with Arent 
Cornelise Viele as one of the two great interpreters of the Indian 
language. Cornelise Antonise Van Slyck could live anywhere 
among the Mohawks whose fidelity and devotion followed the family 
down, deeding the land to his sons Martin, Maurice and Jacque 
Cornelise. To the latter in 1658, Van Slyck's Island, between what 
,is now known as the Frog Alley river, and the Benne Kil. 

Alexander Lindsay Glen, to whom also the Mohawks were warmly 
attached, and whose son, John Alexander, was the so-called Mayor of 
Schenectady on the night of the massacre, lived where the Glen 
family mansion still stands, in the possession of the Sanders family, 
his descendants. 

John Teller, a nephew of Glen's wife, was a resident of Rotter- 
dam, where his family burial lot still exists on the lands of the Hon. 
Simon Schermerhorn. Arent Van Curler, as his real name is 



A GENUINE HOLLANDER. 7 

spelled, was a grand specimen of the genuine Hollander, tender- 
hearted, humane and brave. He was universally trusted and beloved 
by the Mohawks, all governors of New York being called after him. 
He was a cousin of the Patroon, a brewer in Beaverwyck, and an 
intimate friend and companion of Arent Andreas Bradt, who is an 
ancestor of a distinguished county family which has given a Icng 
list of distinguished men, who have served their county in Legisla- 
ture, Congress, and on the battlefields of King and Colony. Van 
Curler was also a trader. His correspondence with the Patroon, and 
his letters to Stuyvesant, in arguing the issue of the .patent, show 
him ito have been a man of intelligence and of unusual education 
for his day and generation. He knew the location of Schenectady 
by heart, and wrote rapturously of the natural beauty of the spot 
and its remarkable adaptability to Indian trade and commerce. But 
he had other motives urged upon him by Bradt and Schermerhorn, 
Teller, Banker and others, who subsequently became the original 
proprietors. Holland claimed and possessed, in right of discovery,, 
the whole territory that included Beaverwyck and the banks of the 
Hudson and Mohawk. Manhattan was the chief port and headquar- 
ters of the traders, who, to prevent competition, organized a great 
corporation, first under the name of the United Netherland Com- 
pany, and afterwards in 1621 secured exclusive privilege, by the title 
of the Privileged West India Company. The real object of this 
company was trade of which it had a complete monopoly. In the 
parlance of this day, in comparison with this gigantic commercial 
output, the Standard Oil and the Steel Trust ''zvasn't in it:' 
Pressure was put upon the directors of the Company in Holland, and 
they yielded by making concessions to the Patroons, another name, 
as was afterwards discovered to the disgust of the Colonist, for the 
Baron with the feudal system of the middle ages. The directors 
were Patroons in earnest. They took up immense tracts of land, 
and though organized ostensibly for the development of the county, 
engaged not only in trade, but burdened it with restrictions, intro- 
ducing slavery, and raising up an aristocracy that for wealth and 
power was not surpassed in the dark day of feudal tyranny. 

The sturdy Dutchman, always a freeman in heart and soul, the 



8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

most liberty-loving and tolerant man on earth, conld not and would 
not endnre it, and began to get away from his irksome condition, 
scattered out of Beaverwyck and the dominion of Fort Orange. It 
was for men like these that Van Curler strove to obtain the patent. 

In the summer of 1660, three years before the emissary of the 
Duke of York came from England to overthrow the Dutchmen, Van 
Curler applied to Governor Stuyvesant at New Amsterdam, for per- 
mission to take possession of the Groote Vlachte, after purchasing it 
from the Mohawks who were willing to take a moderate price for it. 

On the 23d of June an order was issued providing that the title 
be as usual transferred to Stuyvesant, as Director, whatever the peti- 
tioners price to be, returned to them. Before the authority was 
received a terrible freshet occurred, which cut off communication 
with the executive at New Amsterdam and not until a month later 
was the land purchased. It was bought of three Mohawk represen- 
tatives and Chief Cautuqua signing with a grotesque etching of a 
bear as his mark, Aiadane with an impossible turtle as his coat of 
arms, Sonareetsie with a lamb distorted with agony as his sign 
manual, who designated the Groote Vrachte as "Sconnowee." April 
6th, 1662, Van Curler notified Stuyvesant of the action, and asked 
him to send a surveyor. But Beaverwyck and Rensselaerwyck, jeal- 
ous of the new township, and desirous of keeping a monopoly of the 
fur trade, "had a pull" with Director-General Stuyvesant, and induced 
him to order that the settlers of Schenectady should confine them- 
selves to agriculture exclusively, and restrain from all trade with the 
Indians. To this Van Curler and the settlers would not agree, 
imploring the Governor that, as they had paid for their lands, they 
should have them without any restriction. At last, after a long and 
tedious correspondence, desiring to be honest and fair, as all good 
Dutchmen of that day desired to be, the Director-General at last in 
immediate answer to the last appeal of April 17th, 1664, sent up 
Jacques Cortelyou, surveyor to the Board of Directors. Van Cur- 
ler's description in this deed from the Indians was followed and 
resulted in a very meagre plot of land. So continuing the progress 
inaugurated by his Yankee neighbor of crowding out the aboriginal, 
the burgher bought more land, conveyed in the fantastic language 



THE FIRST CHARTER. 9 

of the time signed by Mohawks of unpronounceable names and attested 
by grotesque hieroglyphics in imitation of animal life that was 
never seen in the heavens above, or the earth beneath, or the waters 
under the earth. 

Meantime the Duke of York through Nicholls had ousted Stuyve- 
sant and the Great West Indian company. The Mohawk Dutchman 
in his forest home, where he had begun to settle down to his pipe 
and build on the Groote Vlachte, (the elevated plain on which 
Schenectady was being built) knew little and cared less. So that he 
was free from the Lords of the Manor and was free to worship God 
and Mammon with strict impartiality in his dealings with both, cared 
little or nothing for the change but kept on figuratively and literally 
sawing wood and swapping "aukers of good beer," rundlets of 
brandy, beads, trinkets and any old thing for Mohawk land. 

They applied for a charter to Dongan, the English Governor. 
This charter embraced fully twelve miles of land, extending about 
four miles in width along the north and south banks of the Mohawk 
river. This was denied for indefiniteness of boundary though the 
petitioners were garnted the use of a seal and graciously permitted 
to pay quit rent. Their descendants in Rotterdam are doing it yet. 

Meantime the Indians (Indian givers as the phrase is yet used in 
the valley) began to repudiate their bargain. They were staunchly 
devoted to Jacques Van Slyck, and claimed that he owned the first flat 
for he was of their people, and that much of Van Curler purchase 
to Hilletece and Leah, half breed sisters of Van Slyck, who had 
married Danielse Van Olinda and Jonathan Stevens, and that of all 
the land. Van Curler had bought only the "grassed" and not the 
land, "that is may be some drunken fellow may have made some 
writings without their knowledge." But some more good ankers of 
beer, rundlets of brandy, some beads and a shoddy blanket or two, 
probably settled the question, for the Governor, satisfied with title and 
boundary, finally, Nov. ist, 1664, gave a charter to William Teller, 
Ryer, Schermerhorn, Swere, Teunessen, Van Velsen, Jan Van Eps 
and Mynderst Weniple, on behalf of the inhabitants of the town of 
Schenectady. 

Thus ancient Schenectady was established. The charter was the 



,o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

legal title to lands embraced within 128 square miles of territor>^, 
and about 80,000 acres of land. Its boundaries, as near as we can 
discover from ancient maps, began on the west about where the county 
line is now, at Hoffman's Ferry on the Glenville side, extending over 
a strip about four miles north of the river bank to the Aal Plaats, 
(Eel Place) creek. On the south bank it extended to the hillside, fol- 
lowino- the line of the highland back to Pattersonville and Rotterdam 
Junction, the lands of Hon. Simon Schermerhorn, skirting the base 
of the hills at the residence of the Hon. John D. Campbell, and 
curving around behind the Villa Road, the bowery wood, below 
Union College grounds, (then a forest) with "Hanse Janse Eanklu 
Kil," a large stream that fifty-five years ago contained in what is 
now Jackson's garden, the perch, rock bass, sunfish and suckers of 
the Mohawk River. Now it is dried up and shows no water except 
in early spring or after heavy rains. • From thence to the boundary 
line. 

Arent Bradt died during the negotiation by Van Curler for the 
charter. He left two sons, of whom and their descendants more 
hereafter. He was represented in subsequent divisions of the land 
by Catalina, his widow, who had borne him six children and married 
Barent Jan Van Ditmars. Schenectady, be it remembered, was on 
the Groote Vlachte, a level plateau that began under the hills at about 
Center and Smith streets, ran along on the brow of the slope, easily 
yet to be traced, to the Benne Kil, "Frog Alley River." The Benne 
Kil, the name now given to the center stream, was then called the 
middle Benne Kil, at that time a narrow creek. Thence it followed 
the stream in a high bluff, long since cut away, turning at the Glen- 
ville Bridge until at the poor pasture it curved around the College 
hill, then a forest of pines, keeping southward in a slight elevation 
until it met its starting point. All the rest of the charter lands and 
Indian grants were called Bouwelandts, or farm lands. The inhabi- 
tants of the city were known as burghers. The farmers as bouwer- 
ies. The highest point in this plateau was about opposite the pres- 
ent parsonage of St. George Church where the first fort was built. 

The village was under the government of five trustees, the persons 
named in the Dongan Charter, who governed the hamlet apparently 



ERECTION OF STOCKADES. n 

to the entire satisfaction of the scanty population until the Leisler 
and anti-Leisler factions divided the town just before the massacre. 

A division of lands and property had been made, and the inhabi- 
tants in those perilous days began at once to fortify. They did so 
and from what we have learned of their work, to such good purpose 
that, but for their own fatuity and want of watchful care, the horrors 
of the night of February 2nd, 1690, need never have reddened his- 
tory. Thanks to the energy and public spirit of the Hon. J. W. 
Clute, formerly mayor of the city, all important points in the annals 
and records of the city have been handsomely identified and com- 
memorated by a series of bronze tablets that mark the sites of the 
scenes of eventful occurrences that have made Schenectady known 
the world over. These bronze tablets tell a wonderful story to the 
passer-by. There were several forts built in the village — in fact there 
was always a fort and garrison here until long after the Revolutionary 
War. 

The first defences of the city are described by Major McMurray, 
whose militar}^ education has evidently materially aided him in com- 
ing near to the exact situation. This is the result of his discoveries. 
The method of fortification was by stockades, which the abundance 
of timber at their very doors made a cheap and ready protection. 
Cannon were only used for defense, attacks being always made by 
the musket. 

The stockade consisted of a series of posts or logs from fifteen to 
eighteen feet long, and twelve inches or more thick, sharpened at 
one end and hewed flat on opposite sides. Pine was usually chosen 
because most abundant and easily worked. 

The line of stockade being marked out, a trench three feet deep 
was dug, the posts were set therein, the flattened sides together and 
the earth shoveled back and rammed against them. To strengthen 
the top two adjoining posts were bored and fastened together with 
oaken trenails. At the angles, gates and other important points, 
blockhouses for the shelter of the garrison and guards were built 
and within the stockade all around was a free space, called the 
rondweg, of sufficient width in which the patrol could march. 

In addition to this outer circle of fortification in Schenectady, 



12 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

there was a fort in one of the angles of the latter place, snrronnded 
by a double row of high palisades. This fort was furnished with 
barracks for the garrison, platform, guns, lookouts, etc. In later 
times, when Schenectady became a depot for men and materials, 
there were barracks outside the walls. In 1765 the troops were 
posted along the east side of Feriy street, from Union street to the 
Episcopal church ; in 1762 on the south side of Union street from 
Ferry street to the late Mrs. Colon Clute's house ; in the Revolution- 
ar>^ War on the south side of Union street from Lafayette street east- 
wardly to Quackenbush street. 

For protection and safety, Schenectady was admirably placed, 
being surrounded with water and marsh on three sides and open 
only to the southeast, from which side the inhabitants had little to 
fear. 

The first settlers, though their land lay elsewhere, built their habi- 
tations mainly together for their greater protection. As soon after 
the settlement in 1662 as could conveniently be done, the village 
was stockaded. Starting at State street the line ran along the east 
side of Ferry street to about the gate of the Episcopal church, then 
in a straight line to the north side of Front street a little beyond 
Washington avenue, then southerly and parallel to the same to State 
street and lastly along the same twenty-eight feet south thereof to 
Ferry street or Mill Lane. This was the original plot enclosed, and 
it contained most of the houses of the first settlers. 

The south and west lines remained substantially the same down to 
the time of their extinction soon after the Revolutionary War. The 
Front and Washington street lines were later moved north and west 
to the river bank and the Ferr}^ street line some time after 1765, was 
carried southeasterly to the New York Central Railroad depot and 
thence northerh- through the Dutch church bur}-ing ground to the 
river bank. 

In 1690 it was said, in the French account of the village, that 
there were but two gates ; one at the north end of Church street 
called the ''north gate," the other at State. This was doubtless at 
the junction of State and Church streets and opened out to the roads 



FORTIFICATIONS AND BUILDINGS. 13 

through Mill Lane and Water street, leading to the bouwlands and to 
the Mohawk countr}'. 

In later times there were others at Front and Union streets. The 
foundations of the gates and guardhouses where Ferry crosses 
State and Union streets were exposed in laying the water pipes in 
1871. 

Schenectady was so important a post for the protection of the 
province against the incursions of the Canadians that for the first 
hundred years of its existence it was deemed necessary to strengthen 
it by a fort and garrison. 

The writer is led to believe, from references in the records, that the 
first block house was in the north angle of the stockade at or near 
the junction of Front and Washington streets. This was destroyed 
in 1690 by the French, at which time it was garrisoned by a small 
detachment under Lieutanant Enos Talmage, from Captain Jonathan 
BulPs company, then stationed at Albany. These troops were Con- 
necticut men. 

The magazine stood on or near the lot of Mrs. Willard, then 
belonging to Captain Sander Glen. 

Outside of block houses and the Fort, the most prominent struct- 
ure built before the massacre, was the little Reformed Netherland 
Dutch Church. It stood directly in the centre of the space at the 
intersection of State, Church and Water streets. It was an insignifi- 
cant little place of worship, its exact dimension being unknown, 
perfectly square in shape, with its four roofs running to a peak, on 
which was perched a small belfry or cupola. Around it was a grave 
yard, from whence in 1848, the Hon. John Sanders removed the bones 
of his ancestor, Alexander Lindsay Glen. The building was erected 
in 1682. The houses were built in the old Dutch style, some of 
them with brick; not in a single instance it is believed with bricks 
brought from abroad. Houses are repeatedly pointed out as being 
built of brick brought from Holland. It would not have paid to bring 
bricks from there — the Hollander was of a commercial race — he did 
not carry anything around in trade that did not pay. Bricks did not 
come over in ballast. Ships came from Holland when they had pay- 
ing cargoes, or remained in the Maas or Scheldts until they had one. 



14 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Clay was plenty, and the best of it. Brick making was not such 
skilled labor that its product had to be imported. Abundant mate- 
rial was made in Fort Orange, only twenty miles off by a fairly good 
road. Stone was abundant, of the best kind at that. And lumber 
of all kinds was in the possession of almost every land proprietor. 

The style of the buildings whether of wood, stone or brick, was 
almost that of a building gable end to the street, or with a round 
topped front. A specimen can be seen in the house built by Abra- 
ham Yates (1734) opposite the Court House (now owned by Mrs. 
Joseph Vandebogart) the Bradt house in Rotterdam, west of the 
Pump House, or the Vroman mill at the Brandywine. Within the 
stockade and quadrangle, above described, were the lots of the fifteen 
original proprietors. 

The original plat embraced only the ground extending from the 
main Benne Kil, on the west, to what is now the east side of Ferry 
street, on the east, and from the Mohawk River, on the north, to the 
line of the low lands on the south, including a small portion of the 
Flats. This area they carefully fortified with stockades or palisades well 
knowing that at this point they occupied the extreme front line of 
civilization. And although compactness was studied and desirable 
yet, with a view to business and convenience of posterity and an 
enlightened policy, they laid out their streets wide, regular and at 
right angles, as still exhibited when the palisades were laid. 

I St. Handelaers' street, literally Traders' street. This name con- 
tinued until soon after the destruction and massacre at Schenectady 
in 1690, when the name was changed to "Lion" street, and was so 
called until after the close of the Revolutionary War, when it was 
named "Washington" street, (Washington Avenue) in honor of the 
great First President. This street, until the disastrous fire of 1819, 
when its docks, wharves and storehouses along the main Benne Kil, 
and the mercantile and dwelling houses on the street itself, were 
swept away, was by far the most valuable business portion of the 
city and had been from the day of its settlement. But with that 
desolation of fire and the progressive movements of the Erie canal 
and the strides of railroad power, its business activities have been 
transferred to our State street and the old business center has become. 



LOCATION OF STREETS. 15 

with quiet dignity, a delightful place of residence — one of the most 
charming points of Schenectady. 

2d. Front street retains its original name and was so called 
because it was on the north line of the place, and ran parallel with the 
Mohawk river. 

3d. Ferry street also maintains its first name, and was called 
because one of the gates of the place, and the landing place for its 
boats, canoes and only scow, was at its foot. The Mohawk was 
crossed by no bridges then. The village, and the sparse population on 
the north side of that river, maintained communication by water 
except in the winter season. There the sentinel of snow was sta- 
tioned when the place was surprised in 1690. Here the only 
entrance was made by the French and Indians. The French account 
given by Monsieur DeMonseignat (Paris Doc. LV.,) states: 

" The town of ' Corlear,' (Schenectady) forms a sort of oblong with 
only two gates, one opposite the road we had taken (Ferry street,) 
the other leading to Orange (Albany.) Messieurs DeSainte Helene 
and DeMantet were to enter at the first, which the squaws pointed out 
and which, in fact, was found wide open. Messieurs d'Iberville and 
DeMontesson took the left, with another detachment to join the 
remainder of the party. A profound silence was everywhere 
observed, until the two commanders, who, separated at their entrance 
into the town for the purpose of encircling it, had met at the other 
extremity." 

4th. Church street was always called so because the earliest 
church (Reformed Dutch) was erected on the small public square at 
its southern termination. 

5th. Niskayuna street was so named in honor of the old Niska- 
yuna settlement just outside of the manor of Rensselaerwyck, whose 
inhabitants sympathized with those of Schenectady, and in some 
families were of the same kith and kin. It is now known as Union 
street. 

6th. Albany street was so called until after the burning and mas- 
sacre of 1690, when it was named " Martelaer's street " (Martyr's 
street,) in memory of the cruel slaughter of many of its residents, 
where the murders of that hour and the barbarities of that night 



i6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

seem to have been the most terrific. It was so named until it 
received its present designation, "State street." 

The lots on the village plat and the farming flats on both sides of 
the Mohawk river, embracing the islands therein, as contained in the 
grant, were equitably divided or apportioned among the original pro- 
prietors, who subsequently sold out sections or rights to actual set- 
tlers on easy terms. Aided by such encouragement, the fertility of 
the soil and the advantages of local trading position, Schenectady 
soon advanced in population, prosperity and wealth. 

As is apparent at this late day, the lots on the north side of Front 
street ran through to the " Strand " on the Mohawk river. 

The east side of Ferry street was occupied by a line of pickets, 
placed deeply and firmly in the soil, some remains of which this 
writer, in the march of later-day improvements, has seen excavated 
from the line where both tradition and history claim they were fixed 
by the old pioneers. 

The lots on the south side of State street ran down to and, gen- 
erally, some short distance on the flats. And the lots on the west 
side of Washington avenue extended to the Strand on the main 
Bennekill, which was, until 1819, the harbor and commercial port of 
our comparatively venerable place. 

Besides the portion above named, within the pickets, there were 
four blocks, laid out 400 feet square, Rhineland measure, (400 feet 
Rhineland being 413 feet English measure.) 

In the division Van Curler was first taken care of. With no inten- 
tion to discredit this distinguished man, all indication points to the 
fact that his interest here, as were those of many of the original 
proprietors, was purely commercial. He knew the locality well, 
admired it for its beauty, but was not in the business of founding 
colonies to enjoy beauties of scenery. In fact he was establishing a 
land improvement company for what there was in it. Arent Andries 
Bradt was a half-breed, the son of Andries of Albany and Kinetis, a 
daughter of a Mohawk chief. Arent Bradt was an actual resident 
of Schenectady. Curler and Bradt were brewers and warm personal 
friends. Cornelise Antoinsen Van Slyck had married Olstock, a sis- 
ter of Bradt's wife. It was Bradt and Van Curler Slyck who induced 



EARLY SETTLERS. 17 

the speculative Van Curler to enter into the deal. Bradt bought his 
lot before Van Curler obtained his charter, had built his house and 
lived in it before the survey. He died in 1668, one year before the 
little township was plotted out. Arent's son, Andreas Arent, married 
a half-breed daughter of Jacquese Cornelise Van Slyck. He and his 
wife were killed in the massacre and left one son surviving, Arent 
Bradt, who subsequently became one of the most prominent and dis- 
tinguished men of Schenectady. Samuel Bradt, a son of Arent 
Andreas, the first settler, married also Susannis, another half-breed 
daughter of Jacques Cornelise. The Bradts, it thus appears, con- 
trary to the general impression, have more Indian blood than 
the Van Slycks. They have transmitted it by direct descent in 
male and female line, through most all of the old Mohawk families 
and through many of the English who subsequently came here. All 
the Yateses, descending from Col. Christopher and Teller who were 
born at the Aal Plass in 1734 and 1744 and married daughters of Capt. 
Andreas Bradt, have a full strain of it. 



CHAPTER H. 
The Founders of Schenectady. 

Van Curler's lot, which he never occupied, was on the northwest 
corner of Church and LTnion streets, embracing one-quarter of the 
block, being two hundred feet square. It covers the present site 
of the classical department premises of the .Union school, the 
County Judge's and clerk's offices, etc. His bowerel farm, after his 
death called Juffrow's Landts, comprised one hundred and fourteen 
acres of flat land immediately southwest of the village which, sub- 
sequent to his decease, was sold in sections to divers individuals. 
Van Curler left no children. His widow continued to reside in 
Schenectady until she died January 15th, 1675. 

Philip Hendrickse Brouwer was the second of the original pro- 
prietors. He was in Beaverwyck as early as 1655, where he owned 



i8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

a house, lot and brewery and became one of the proprietors of 
Schenectady. He died soon after, in 1664, having previously acci- 
dentally shot Class Cornelise Swits there, who was not a proprietor, 
but an early settler, and had n.arried the daughter of Symon 
Symonse Groot, who had long been in the employ of the West India 
Company as boatswain of the ship Prince Maurice. His wife's 
name was Elsie Tjerk. Brouwer left no children. 

His village lot, two hundred feet square, was on the northwest 
corner of Church and State streets. It is on a portion of this lot 
that the present law office of Charles P. Sanders now stands- 
Shortly after his decease the lot was sold to Cornelius Van Ness, who 
had married the widow of Dirk Van Eps, and subsequently conveyed 
the lot to his step-son, John Dirksie Van Eps, who, in the massacre 
of 1690, was killed, with two of his children, and his son, John 
Baptist, taken prisoner. Afterwards, John's widow married Gysbert 
Gerritse Van Brakel, a wealthy citiz'^n, whose son Alexander had 
been killed, and his son Stephen captured, on the same disastrous 
occasion. 

Alexander Lindsay Glen was the third original proprietor named, 
called by the Dutch, Sander Leendertse Glen. He was a Scotchman 
of the Highlands, born in the vicinity of Invernes, and a refugee 
to Holland, from whence he emigrated with the Dutch to New 
Netherlands at a very early day. It appears from the colonial 
records, that he was an agent of the West India Company, at Fort 
Nassau on the Delaware, in 1643 5 received a grant of land there, 
and prepared to build in 1651, but was prevented by the violence of 
the Swedes. 

Alexander Lindsey Glen's village lot in Schenectady, on the 
division was 200 feet front on the west side of what is now 
Washington Avenue, running down with equal breadth to the strand 
on the main Bennekill. A part of these premises, being the exact 
location of the old Glen family city residence, belonged to, and was 
occupied by, one of his lineal descendants until it was destroyed by 
the great fire of 181 9. 

Mr. Glen's farm apportionment embraced the flats and adjacent 



ANECDOTE OF COLONEL JOHN GLEN. 19 

islands, on the north side of the Mohawk river, as by him previously 
occupied by permission of the Indians. 

Major John A. Glen bnilt the present Sanders mansion at Scotia, 
in 1 7 13, (now occnpied by Charles P. Sanders, Esq.,) and occupied 
by himself for seventeen years, until his death. His whole estate, 
both real and personal, was spared when Schenectady was destroyed, 
by express order of the Governor of Canada for rescues made and 
kindnesses shown to sundry French prisoners captured with Van 
Curler, from whom he had received valuable lessons. 

The circumstances attending one of those rescues are so interest- 
ing and ingenious that the temptation of incorporating here an 
extract from the draft of a letter written by Judge Sanders to a 
friend, in 1874, giving an account of the occurrences, is irresistible. 

" .The Mohawks of Scotia's early days were always devoted friends 
of the Dutch, but they were barbarous, after all, and the white pop- 
ulation was too sparse, weak and timid, to interfere with the chival- 
ric customs of those noble knights of the tomahawk, blunderbuss, 
bow and arrow. 

" The writer's father has shown him a hillock, not far from the 
present Scotia house, where, after their return from warlike or plun- 
dering expeditions, they were wont to sacrifice their victims. Even 
so late as the time of his grandfather. Col. Jacob Glen, a Mohegan 
Indian was burned on the spot. This surely was revolting, but the' 
monarchs of the valley, original owners of the soil, willed it so and 
nothing was left to civilization but to mitigate or ameliorate and 
this the Christian pioneers accomplished when possible; and many 
were the acts of kindness which, according to the accounts of the 
French themselves, were rendered by the Glens of Scotia to parties 
captured by the Mohawks. 

" Under such circumstances, according to well established tradi- 
tion, it happened that sometime about five years before the burning 
of Schenectady in 1690, towards sundown of a beautiful summer 
afternoon, the original large stone house, according to the French 
accounts, stood on the bank of the Mohawk (its site now covered by 
water, though the writer has seen a portion of its foundation wall.) 
The home and estate of John Sanders (Alexander) Glen, was occu- 



20 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

pied only by himself, his wife, four daughters and two sons. His 
eldest daughter, Catrina, was then only thirteen years of age, and 
his then youngest son, Jacob Alexander, subsequently the ancestor of 
the Baltimore Glens, was in his cradle. He had a large family of 
negro slaves (for Mr. Glen was an extensive land cultivator and pro- 
prietor.) On this occasion while they were quietly surrounded by 
the enchanting beauty of its lake, river, lowlands, adjacent island 
and a full view of Schenectady, and all was peace, a large party of 
Mohawks, just returned from the north, encamped below the Glen 
mansion, as in that day of aboriginal power they claimed clear right 
to do, as original sovereigns of the soil. 

" The party was in a high state of elation and triumph, having 
captured a Roman Catholic Jesuit priest, against whom they enter- 
tained extreme antipathy. The reason of their peculiar dislike to 
priests was this : The IVIohawks were Protestants, after their cwn 
fashion, because the Dutch were, and this priest, with others, had 
proselyted among them and caused some, as a Catholic party, to 
remove to Canada. 

" Now these rejoicing, victorious Christians soon announced to 
Mr. Glen and wife, that they intended a special roast of their cap- 
tive on the following morning. So they brought the unfortunate 
priest along for Glen to lock up in his cellar until they should want 
him for their pious sacrifice. 

" Mr. Glen and his wife (the last very much praised in the French 
accounts for her many acts of benevolence and humanity to cap- 
tives) did not see it in that light. Now Major Coudre (Glen) pos- 
sessed two keys to his locked cellar and, aware of the confidence the 
Mohawks placed in him, also of their credulity and superstition, 
raised this clear-sighted well-intended and formidable objection. 

" That the Mohawks were his friends, and he felt pleasure at all 
proper times to oblige them; but, in this case, he would not take the 
responsibility. ' Priests ' were ' wizzards,' and could go through any 
keyhole; suppose the priest was gone in the morning, what then ? 
' No, he should take no risk.' But one thing he proposed ' with 
wise solemnity.' They might lock him up, and take the key them- 
selves. This just proposition Mrs. Glen seconded. It was ratified, 



ESCAPE OF A PRIEST. 21 

the poor priest placed in close quarters, and the key duly delivered 
to his captors. 

" Mr. Glen had also suggested, at a proper time, in a quiet way, 
and to the proper ears, that early in the morning, before daylight, 
he should send his team to Albany for salt, so as to excite no sus- 
picions about movements contemplated or an early stir. 

" Well, the noble Mohawk, as was customary after a campaign, got 
their rum from Schenectady and feasted, drank, danced and sang, 
until the wee small hours of the morning, when their exhausted 
nature, and even their dogs, settled into stupid repose. 

" This lull. Major Glen, his wife x\nna, and faithful slaves, having 
watched, placed the priest in a wagon, in a hogshead with the lower 
head out, and the bung hole to breath through, and with a good team 
the priest and two negro men started for Albany after a load of salt. 
The priest was quietly and well received by the humanitarians of 
Albany, and silently forwarded to Montreal. Publicity, after such a 
joke on Mohawk warriors, was impolitic ; but this kind act bore 
abundant and blessed fruit afterwards to the Glen family in 1690, 
when Schenectady was burned. Nor was it ever heard that Major 
or Mrs. Glen, or their faithful slaves, ever felt any remorse about 
the pious fraud. 

"The team, hogshead, priest and negroes were gone. The dawn 
of morning came, with it the Mohawks, having an important mis- 
sion on hand, a roast; but Mr. Glen took the matter easy. The 
Mohawks found the cellar closed, ' but the priest had flown.' Sleep 
to Mr. Glen then became impossible ; the shouts were awful, and the 
agonies of disappointed justice became simply diabolical. When 
Major Glen appeared, and said calmly to his Indian friends, ' I told 
you so ; I told you so; priests are wizards.' And they reluctantly 
responded: ' Coudre,' ( his Indian name) 'was right.' Nor was it 
ever known that any Mohawk of that generation discovered the 
deception. Major Glen was always a great favorite of the Mohawks; 
his sayings and doings were ex-cathreda." 

Simon Volkertse Veeder was the fourth named proprietor. He 
was born in Holland in 1624 5 bought a lot at New Amsterdam in 



22 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

1652 ; sold the same and came to Beaverwyck in 1654, and from 
thence removed to Schenectady in 1662. He owned, on the division, 
a farm on the great fiat, nnmbered 9, containing- fifty-one acres, and 
a lot on the north side of State street, at its jnnction with Ferry 
street, 200 feet sqnare, and also owned considerable possessions on 
the Norman's Kil. 

Few settlers contributed more to the healthy and vigorous early 
settlement of Schenectady than this proprietor, who died January 
8th, 1696, aged about 72 years. His descendants are numerous, all 
bearing the name and having his blood. 

Swear (Ahasueras) Teunise Van Velsen ( alias Van Westbrock,) 
was the fifth named proprietor. In 1664 he married Maritie Myn- 
derse, widow of Jan Barentse Wemp. About this time he removed 
from Lnbberda's land (Troy,) to Schenectady, and built a grist mill 
on Mill Lane. This was carried away by the flood, and rebuilt by 
him in 1673. In consideration of his loss, the community generally 
allowed him to take one-eighth, instead of one-twentieth, as a toll, 
out of grain ground there. 

Besides the one-half of the great Van Slyck island, purchased by 
him of Jan Barentse Wemp, (who had previously obtained the one-half 
interest therein of Martin Mauris Van Slyck, which he held conjointly 
with Jacques Cornelise Van Slyck, the brother of Martin Mouris, who 
owned the other equal undivided one-half) he owned the land on the 
south side of State street from Church street, including Mill Lane, 
nearly to Cowhorn creek, and extending upon the lowlands so as to 
comprehend about twenty-five acres. 

Swear Teunise (so always called) was a much-respected and 
influential citizen of Schenectady. In 1676 he was a magistrate of 
the village, and one of the five patentees named in the great town- 
ship grant, confirmed in 1684. He was slain in the massacre of 
1690, with his wife and four negro slaves, leaving no descendants or 
heirs. 

Cornelius Antonisen Van Slyck, called by the Mohawks " Broer 
Cornells " (brother Cornelis), was the seventh named proprietor, and 
an early settler at Beaverwyck. Previous to 1640 he married a 
Mohawk chieftian's daughter, by whom he had several children, 



EARLY PROPRIETORS 23 

viz.: Jacques, Martin, ]\Ioiiris, Hiliitie and Leah. Martin Monris 
(Maurice) gave name to the island lying between the Mohawk river 
and the main Binnekill, west of Schenectady (now called Van 
Slyck's island). This son, Martin Mouris, a tradition hands down, 
died early in 1662. 

Cornelius Antonisen was a proprietor, and received his portion on 
division, but the location of his farm and village lot the writer has 
been unable to determine, or even whether he was, at any time, a 
settled resident of Schenectady. His original home was Beaver- 
wyck, but most of his time was passed among the Mohawks, at their 
upper or great castle at Canajoharie, either as an interpreter for the 
province, or as a trader, or because he had married among them, and 
been adopted by the tribe. 

Such marriages were not deemed disreputable, for the Mohawks 
enjoyed high character among the tribes of North America, and 
were wonderfully generous in grants or outfits of land to their white 
friends, and especially to married connections of the tribe, which last 
were uniformly adopted as members of their community. 

Cornelius Antonisen died in 1676, at an advanced age, fourteen 
years after the decease of his son, Martin Mouris. He was reputed 
to be a man of excellent character and unbending integrity, possess- 
ing great influence among the Mohawks particularly, and the Five 
Nations generally. By reason of his eminent services on severa] 
occasions, in bringing about peace with the natives, he received a 
patent for a large tract of land at Catskill, He also owned land at 
Cohoes, granted to him by the Mohawks, near their old castle at the 
mouth of the Mohawk river. 

Accustomed, as Cornelius Antonisen was, to Indian customs and 
peculiarities, it certainly tells much for his sense of what was due to 
his civilization and early education, that, during his life, he had only 
one wife and one family. It was owing to his sterling character, 
aided by his extended landed interests, that, although his son, Mar- 
tin Mouris, died young and unmarried, his son, Jacques, and his 
daughters, Hillitie and Leah, and their respective descendants, mar- 
ried among the most respectable, full-blood white families in the 
province. This fact might be illustrated by well-preserved genea- 



24 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

logical tables, but it would exceed the proposed limit of this local 
history ; so the writer contents himself with adding the son, Jacques 
Cornelise, who will be treated of hereafter as one of the early pro- 
prietors of Schenectady. 

Gerrit Bancker was the eighth proprietor. He hailed from 
Amsterdam in Holland. He was at New Amsterdam before 1655, 
and, in 1667, was settled at Beaverwyck, wdiere he continued to 
reside until his death in 1691. When Arent Van Curler began the 
settlement of Schenectady in 1661, he became one of the original 
proprietors. Farm lot number six, on the Bouwland, was appor- 
tioned to him, and his village lot comprised the northerly quarter of 
the block bounded by Washington, Union, Church and State streets. 
His son Evert held his property until 1702, when he sold it to Isaac 
Swits. 

Gerrit Bancker left two children : Evert, born January 24th, 1665, 
who, on the 24th day of September, 1686, married Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Christopher Jans Abeel ; also a daughter, Anna, who married 
Johannas DePeyster of New York, September 21st, 1688. 

William Teller was the ninth proprietor named. He was born in 
Holland A. D., 1620, and was the first Teller wdio came to the New 
Netherlands, arriving at New Amsterdam in 1639, when he was sent 
to Fort Orange by Governor Kieft, and entered into the service of 
the West India Company. He was '' Machtmeester " of the Fort, 
and for many years a trader at Beaverwyck, continuing his residence 
there from 1639 to 1692, when he removed to New York, accom- 
panied by all of his sons, except his son John, who was settled in 
Schenectady. 

William Teller married Margaret Dongan, a sister to Alexander 
Lindsay Glen's wife. He was not only an original proprietor, but 
one of the five patentees mentioned in the first patent of the town, 
granted by Governor Dongan in 1684. On the apportionment, in 
1664, his allotments on the flats were numbered five, the foremost 
lot lying on the west side of, and separated by, the Tellers' Killitie 
from Elias Van Guysling's farm. This Van Guysling farm, situated 
on the Bouwland, in Rotterdam, remained in that family from 
that time to 1665, when Cornelius Van Guysling died without issue. 



THE TENTH PROPRIETOR. 25 

William Teller's village lot, two hundred feet square, was on the 
northeast corner of Union and Washington streets. He gave all his 
real estate in Schenectady to his son John, in 1700, who also 
remained, when the rest of the family removed to New York. Wil- 
liam Teller was an individual of wealth and great influence in his 
day. He died in 1701 and left seven children. All the Tellers in 
this section of our country are descended from his son John. U. S. 
Senator Teller from Colorado, Secretary of the Interior, is a 
descendant of this William Teller. 

Bastian DeWinter was the tenth proprietor named. He came 
from Middleburg in Holland, and was at Schenectady as early as 
1662. On the apportionment his village lot, 200 feet square, was 
situated on the southeast corner of Church and Union streets, and 
his farm on the flats was subsequently known as Elias Van Guysling's 
plantation. Falling sick in 1670, he sold all his real estate to Elias 
Van Guysling and others, with the intention of returning to Holland. 
His death prevented his return. He left no heirs in this countr)-, 
and in 1678 the Dutch Church at Albany (the church at Schenec- 
tady being not yet erected ) claimed, and in some way obtained his 
property for the use of the poor. 

Bastian DeWinter, as the attorne)- of Catalina, widow of x^rent 
Andries Bradt (commonly called '' the Noorman ") became, as such 
attorney, the eleventh proprietor named. Mr. Bradt became one of 
the proprietors of Schenectady in 1662, but died soon after and 
before any apportionment was made, leaving his widow, Catalina, 
and six children surviving him. x\fter his death the flats and vil- 
lage lot which fell to his share was conflrmed to his widow, through 
DeWinter, for herself and Bradt's children. The farm was No. i on 
the Bouwland, and the village lot was the southwest quarter of the 
block bounded by Washington, Union, Church and State streets, and 
was 200 feet square, Amsterdam measure. 

This Catalina Bradt was the daughter of Andries DeVos, a magis- 
trate and deputy-director of Rensselaerwyck. She was reputed to be 
a lady of intelligence and good education for the limited opportuni- 
ties of that day. She had great and sad experiences in the early his- 
tory of Schenectady. 



26 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Pieter Danielse Van Olinda was the twelfth proprietor named. 
Judge Sanders was unable to locate his village lot, or his farm on the 
Bouwlandt. He married Hilitie, the daughter of Cornelius 
Antonisen Van Slyck, and a sister of Jacques Cornelise. She was a 
half-blood Mohawk and was a paid interpretress of the Provincial 
Government. The Mohawks gave her several tracts of land. She 
died February loth, 1707. He died in 17 16. They left three 
sons, Daniel, Jacob and Mathias. 

Peter Jacobse Borsboom was the thirteenth proprietor named. His 
house lot in the village, 200 feet square, was the northwest quarter 
of the block bounded by Front, Washington, Church and Union 
streets. He had also two farms allotted to him on the Bouwlandt. 
He died in 1688, and left surviving him one son, Cornelius, who died 
young and unmarried ; also four daughters, viz.: Anna, who married 
John Pieterse Mabie ; Maria, who married Hendrick Brower ; Fytie, 
who married Martin Van Benthuysen ; Catharine, who married John 
Oliver. The name has disappeared in this county. 

Jan Barentse (Wemple) was the fourteenth proprietor named. He 
was an inhabitant of Beaverwyck as early as 1643. Having pur- 
chased the interest of Martin Maurice Van Slyck in 1662, he 
received, as joint owner with Martin Maurice's brother, Jacques 
Cornelise, a patent for the Great Island, lying immediately west of 
Schenectady, which interest was subsequently owned by Swear 
Teunise Van Velsen, who had married Wemp's widow. Wemp also 
had a house lot in the village, on the west side of Washington street, 
a little north on State street, with a front of 200 feet on Washington 
street, running down with equal width to the strand on the main 
Binnekill. He died in 1663, an ancestor of an extensive list of 
descendants. 

Jacques Cornelius Van Slyck was the fifteenth and last proprietor 
named. He was born at the great Indian Castle, Canajoharie, in 
1640. The Mohawks gave him and his brother, Martin Maurice, the 
large island in the Mohawk river, lying immediately west of the city, 
and only, separated from it by the main Binnekill ; to each brother 
the equal undivided one-half. Jan Barentse Wemp subsequently 



THE FIRST MINISTER. 27 

purchased the interest of Martin Maurice, which, as has been shown, 
eventually vested in Swear Teunise Van Velsen. 

The Mohawks also gave Jacques Cornelise a tract of land five 
miles above the city, on the south side of the Mohawk, a portion of 
which is still occupied by his lineal descendants. He also owned 
land on the flats, apportioned to him as a proprietor, on the division, 
unlocated, except that it was the first flat, and was, after his decease, 
divided among his heirs. 

His village lot, granted on the only public square of the place, on 
which the first church was erected, was on that front extending 
between State and Water streets, and running westerly along both 
streets, to an alley still existing, dividing the Van Slyck lot from the 
premises now owned and occupied by the Young Women's Christian 
Association. 

Dominie Petrus Thesschenmaecker was the first settled minister 
in Schenectady. Having officiated in 1676 in Kingston, to the 
acceptance of the people, they petitioned for his continuance. In 
1679 he was ordained in New York, by a council comprising the 
ministers then settled in the province, as of the church at Newcastle 
on the Delaware, where he continued until about 1684 when he came 
to Schenectady. In the destruction of the village in 1690, the parson- 
age, the site of which is unknown, was burned and the Dominie was 
killed. He left no heirs. 

This completes the list of the original proprietors. But others 
came before 1690. Herman Albertie Vedder, ancestor of all the 
Vedders in this county, and wdio married into the Indian blood of 
the Van Slycks ; Symon Symonse Groot, whose five children were 
taken captives on the night of the massacre ; Johannes Van Eps who 
came to this city and was slain on Church street with his two chil- 
dren, two sons and a daughter escaping. 

Class Frederickse Van Patten came to Schenectady in 1664. In 
1668 he bought, in company with Cornelius Cornelisse Viele, the 
farm of Martin Cornelisse Van Issesteyn (Esselstyn,) lying next west 
of the farm of Ryer Schermerhorn, the elder, who was his brother- 
in-law. Van Patten having married Aeffie, the daughter of Arent 
Andreas Bradt and Catalyntje DeVos. His bouwery remained in the 



28 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

family for several generations. In 1690 Van Patten was appointed a 
justice of the peace by Leisler. He was born jVIay 30tli, 1641, and 
died October 3d, 1728, aged 87 years. He left surviving him 
three sons and three daughters. 

Isaac Swits settled in Schenectady in 1664. He married Susanna, 
daughter of Simon Groot ; his village lot was on the west side of 
Washington street opposite the west end of State street. On the 
destruction of the town in 1690, he was carried away captive, 
together with his oldest son, Cornelius, but- they were ransomed and 
returned home the following July. 

Johannes Putnam came to Schenectady in 1664. He married Cor- 
nelia, daughter of Arent Andries Bradt and Catalyntje DeVos. His 
homestead lot was on the northwest corner of Union and Ferry 
streets, having 100 feet next west from Jan Roeloefse, the oldest son 
of the celebrated Anneke Janse, by her first marriage. He sold sub- 
ject to the life estate of himself and wife, Roeloefse had no child- 
ren. On the disastrous night of February 9th, 1690, both Putnam 
and his neighbor Roeloefse, with their wives, were slain by the 
French and Indians. Jan Putnam left three sons and two daughters. 

John Apple came to Schenectady in 1668 ; he, too, was wounded 
in his limbs at the destruction in 1690. The Apples removed to New 
York in 1693. William had a son, Simon, and a daughter, Maria 
Magdalena, who married Johannes Vrooman, a nephew of the dis- 
tinguished Adam. 

Hanse Janse Eenklwys. This was truly a remarkable old Hollan- 
der who came to reside at Schenectady in 1670. Already as early as 
1632, he was an officer of the Dutch West India Company, under the 
administration of Governor Van Twiller, and erected the standard 
(the arms of the States-General ) at a spot called Kievit's Hoeck, 
(now Saybrook,) at the mouth of the Connecticut river. (See O'CaL 
laghan's His. N. Y. Netherlands, Vol. i, p. 149.) In July, 1648, on 
the occasion of Governor Stuyvesant's visit to Rensselaerwyck, he 
was employed to clean the Patroon's cannons and fire the salute. 
When he came to Schenectady, being an old man, without any rela- 
tions in this country, he made, by his will, the deacons of the Dutch 
Church of Schenectady his devisees and legatees, on condition that 



THE EARLY CHURCH. 29 

he should be supported by them in his old age and weakness, which 
they did to his satisfaction for thirteen years, and when he died, in 
1683, at a very advanced age, they bnried him with dne respect and 
solemnity. The church inherited all his property, consisting mostly 
of forty acres of land, of what was formerly known as the Poor Pas- 
ture, being that portion of it lying west of or above Hansen Kil, 
(now College brook.) That portion of the Poor Pasture lying east 
of or below the creek, called " The Boght," was bought of Harma- 
nus Van Slyck, in 1806, for $1,750. The memory of brave, honest 
Hans Janse Eenklwys should always be cherished by the descendants 
of Schenectady's pioneers. Monuments, in these latter days, are 
often erected to perpetuate the memory of those who possessed but a 
small share of his experience, honesty, gallantry and worth. He 
gave to the church of his affections his memories of Holland, and all 
he possessed. 

Jan Peck was an early settler at New Amsterdam ; he owned 
Landbat Peekskill, and Peekskill Creek was named after him. He 
owned also, in 1655, much property at Fort Orange. He married, 
February 20th, 1650, Marianne Dertruy, (Truax) neice of old Philip 
Truax. He never lived in Schenectady, but late in life, his widow, 
Maria, did, with her son. Jacobus. Jan left two sons and two 
daughters. 

John Roelafsen, the oldest son and youngest child of the cele- 
brated Anneke Janse, by her first marriage to Rollof Jansen, having 
sold his interest in his mother's property in Albany to Derick Wersel 
Ten Broeck, removed from Albany to Schenectady in 1670. He had, 
in that year, at Albany, accidentally killed one Gerrit Verbeeck, for 
which accident he was pardoned by the Governor. His lot was on 
the north side of Union street, 100 feet west of Ferry street, being 
the same great lot now owned by the Messrs. Joseph and Giles Y. 
Van der Bogert. . At the date of his mother's will in 1663 he was 
unmarried. He subsequently married, but having no children or the 
prospects of any, he sold his lot and buildings to John Putman, his 
neighbor, owning and occupying the lot lying adjoining on the east, 
reserving for himself and wife a life estate in the premises. But on 
the fatal night of February 9th, 1690, Roelafsen and his wife and 



30 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Putman and his wife were slain b}' the French and Indians. Jan 
Roelafsen was born in 1636, and at the time of his death was fifty- 
four years of age. 

Barent Janse Van Ditmars came to Schenectady in 1670, and mar_ 
ried Catalyntje DeVos, widow of Arent Andriesse Bradt ; he owned 
land on the south side of the Mohawk river, near the " Steen Kil." 
He had a son Cornelius, who married Catharina, daughter of John 
Alexander Glen, of Scotia. Van Ditmars and his son were both 
massacred at the slaughter of 1690. The widow of Cornelius in 
1692, married Gerrit Lansing, Jr., of Albany. 

Captain Martin Krigier, (Crigier) leaving New York, settled on 
his farm in Niskayuna in 1672, ending his days there in the early 
part of 1 713, aged about ninety years. The farm, or some portions 
of it, is still possessed by some of his descendants. He was the first 
burgomaster of New Amsterdam (New York); was a fearless and 
skillful military leader and an exemplary magistrate. (O'Callaghan's 
Hist. N. Netherlands, Vol. 2, p. 554.) 

Christian C hristianse came to Schenectady in 1672. In that year 
he bought three acres of land of Paulus Janse. His village lot was 
on the north side of Union street, adjoining the Dutch Church lot, 
and included the Isaac Riggs and Aaron Barringer lots ; it was 100 
feet front, Amsterdam measure. He sold this lot in 1694 to Neetje, 
widow of Hendreck Gardenier. Christian married Maritje Elders. 
He left surviving him two sons and several daughters. His name 
survives. 

R}'nier Schaats, a physician and surgeon, eldest son of Dominie 
Schaats of Albany, came to Schenectady in 1675. He married 
Catrina Bensing. His village lot was on the north side of Union 
street, 100 feet west of Church street, the same as now occupied by 
the clerk's, surrogate's and other county offices, and partly by the late 
ex-]\Iayor Hunter. Rynier and one of his sons were killed at the 
slaughter of 1690, after which his only surviving children, Gideon 
and Agnietje, conveyed the property to Symon Simonse Groot. 
Liesler appointed Rynier a justice of the peace in 1689. 

Hendrick INIeese Vrooman came to Schenectady in 1677. His 
house lot was on the north side of State street, extending from what 



DEFENSE OF HOMES. 31 

is now Centre street, and including the location of the Central depot. 
His farm was a portion of Van Curler's land. The former freight 
house of the Mohawk and Hudson railroad stood nearly in the 
centre of his land. In the massacre of 1690, he was killed, with 
his son, Bartholomew, and two of his negro slaves. His son John 
was carried away into captivity. He left surviving him two sons, 
Adam and John. 

Adam, his oldest son, born in Holland, 1649, was naturalized in 
the province of New York in 171 7. He was a millright by occupa- 
tion. In 1683, he built a mill on the Sand Kill, where the Bran- 
dy wine mills lately stood. In 1690, when Schenectady was burned 
and sacked by the French and Indians, he saved his life by bravery 
in defending his house, which then stood on the west corner of 
Church and Front streets, where the residence of Mrs. Linn now 
stands. Of the French account we will make further mention here- 
after. Monseiur DeMonseignat to Madame DeMaintenon (Paris Doc. 
IV. Doc. His. N. Y., Vol. i, p. 297, etc.) 

"The sack of the town began a moment before the attack on the 
fort ; few houses made any resistance. M. D. Montigny (Lieut. La 
Marque DeMontigny, a gallant young volunteer ofhcer,) discovered 
some houses, one of which he attempted to carry sword in hand, 
having tried the musket in vain. He received two thrusts of a spear, 
one in the body, the other in the arm; but M. DeSainte Helene hav- 
ing come to his aid, effected an entrance, and put every one who de- 
fended that house to the sword." 

Judge Sanders says : " That gallant, I may well add, desperate 
defense was made by Adam Vrooman, assisted only by his wife, 
Angelica, daughter of Harman Janse Ryckman of Albany. On that 
dreadful night, his intrepid wife and her infant child were killed; 
His two sons, Barent and Wouter, were carried away captive. His 
father, Hendrick Meese, his brother Bartholomew, and two of his 
father's negroes, were killed, and he, of all his own family, alone was 
left a monument amid the surrounding desolation. 

" How and why was the indomitable Adam Vrooman spared ? 
Tradition assigns several reasons. First. That M. DeSainte Helene, 
the commander of the expedition, in admiration of his heroism, 



32 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

offered him safety on surrender. Second. That the hostile Mohawks 
knew him well and sought to save him. Third. As a favor to his 
brother-in-law, Jacques Cornelise Van Slyck. Fourth. On the inter- 
cession of his friend, John Alexander Glen. Fifth. That he escaped 
after capture, for he was not carried into captivity, although his two 
sons were. Whatever may be the true reason, it is satisfactor}' to 
know that he lived forty years distinguished and useful. This is 
indeed wonderful after so much of affliction and disaster. 

Mr. Jeremiah Fuller, on the 29th of March, 1792, purchased the 
corner lot of Church and Front streets with the identical building of 
Vrooman's defense upon it, of Cornelius Antoinesen Van Slyck, for 
^300. It was taken down and reconstructed the same year, and its 
yellow pine timbers used (which are now in a perfect state of preser- 
vation, though of a \er}' dark brown color through age, having been 
protected from the weather) in the construction of the present dwell- 
ing. 

He became an extensive owner of some of the most fertile lands 
of the province. In 1688 the Mohawk sachems conveyed to him a 
valuable tract at Fort Hunter. In 1708 he obtained from the trus- 
tees of Schenectady, a grant for the Sand Kil and adjacent lands 
for milling purposes. In 1714 he obtained a patent for lands in 
Schoharie, where now stands the village of Middleburgh, which he 
settled in 17 15, and it was then known as Vrooman's land. Some 
of the Palatines attempted to drive him off. He commenced a stone 
house, twenty-three feet square, with the help of his sons, and had 
proceeded as far as the second story floor beams, when, one night, 
his unruly neighbors, led by the notorious Conrad Weiser, entirely 
demolished it. He then retired to his property in Schenectady and 
petitioned the Governor for redress, who succeeded in stopping the 
opposition. (Doc. His., Vol. Ill, p. 412.) In 1726 he took out an 
additional patent in that vicinity of 1,400 acres for his son Peter. 
He made his will September 12th, 1729, and died on his farm at 
Schoharie, February 25th, 1730, aged 81 years. He possessed great 
wealth and left a reputation for fearless bravery, strict integrity and 
excellent Christian character. He was true to his affection for the 
home of his early days and the scene of his wonderful exploit of 



STURDY DUTCHMEN. ^3 

heroism. By his own express direction he was interred in his private 
bnrs'ing ground, now No. 35 Front street, in the city of Schenec- 
tady, on the east portion of the lot occupied by the residence of the 
Hon. John A. DeRemer. 

Adam Vrooman was married three times ; first, in 1678 to Engel- 
tie, daughter of Marman Janse Ryckman ; second, in 1691, to 
Grietje Ryckman, his first wife's sister, and widow of Jacques Cor- 
nelise Van Slyck ; thirdly, January 13th, 1697, to Grietje Takels'i 
Heemstreet, in Albany. His descendants are very numerous extend- 
ing far and wide through the Union, but mostly settled in the 
Mohawk and Schoharie valleys. He had nine sons and four daugh- 
ters, most of whom survived him. 

Barent, his oldest son, born in 1679, was carried away captive to 
Canada in 1690. He married June i8th, 1699, Catrina Heemstreet, 
of Albany. He had a brewery on the north side of Union street, 
near to or upon the present crossing of the New York Central and 
Hudson River Railroad. He lived on the north corner of Center 
and State streets. He died in 1746, leaving one son, Adam, and one 
daughter, Engeltie. 

Wouter, the second son of Adam, born in 1680, was also carried 
captive to Canada in 1690. 

Adam Vrooman and his younger brother, John, were men of large 
frame and great muscular "power — their descendants, even at this 
day, give weight to the reputation. Adam Vrooman, especially, was, 
we are informed, a man of gigantic stature and immense bodily 
strength, and in confirmation of what that power probably was, 
Judge Sanders quotes as follows : 

" There were among the early Schoharie settlers, some remarkable 
for great strength. Cornelius, Samuel, Peter and Isaac, sons of Peter 
Vrooman," (this last was a son of historic Adam), are said to have 
possessed the strength of giants. They erected the first sawn. ill in 
the county, which stood in Clayer, N. Y,, on the little Schoharie 
Kil. Two of these brothers could easily carry a good sized log to 
the carriage. 

Many anecdotes are related by the aged, showing the strength of 
the Vrooman family. At the hill mentioned as the tongbergh, on 



34 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

the road to Albany, Cornelius, the strongest of the brothers, always 
made a practice, when going to Albany with wheat, to carry one or 
two bags, each containing two or three skipples (each three pecks) 
up this hill to favor his horses. Twenty-five skipples was the ordin- 
ary load to Albany, and usually brought fifty cents per skipple. 

" Samuel Vrooman is said to have carried at one time, twelve skip- 
ples of wheat and a harrow with iron teeth, from his father's house 
across a small bridge back of it, and set them down in a field. 

" x'Vt another time Cornelius carried ten skipples of peas, the same 
harrow, and a brother on the top of them, the same distance, in 
either caSe 800 or 900 pounds. 

" The stout Vroomans had a remarkably strong sister. A quarrel- 
some man being at her father's, warm words passed between him and 
her brother Cornelius, when the sister, fearing the consequences if her 
kinsman laid hands upon the intruder in anger, siezed him, although a 
pretty strong man, and pitched him neck and heels out of the house 
saying to the unhappy aborigine, ' the boy might hurt you.' The 
battered and bruised Mohawk undoubtedly thought that he could not 
have been worse off if the boy had hurt him." 

Harman Myndertse Van Der Bogart, this is one of the oldest 
names identified with the earliest settlement of New Netherlands. 
Born in Holland in 161 2, he came to New Amsterdam in 1661, as 
surgeon of the ship Eendracht, and continued in the West India 
Company's service until 1663, after which he resided at New Amster- 
dam as a physician until appointed commissioner at Fort Orange. 
He was a highly educated and respected man, though, from all 
accounts, he appears to have been of an irascible temper. An 
instance is mentioned ( see O'Callaghan's History New Netherlands) 
of his having attempted, in the excitement of a high quarrel, when 
both appear to have been in a violent passion, to throw the director 
( Wouter Van Twiller ) out of a boat, in which they were sailing on 
the river ; and he was with difficulty prevented from accomplishing 
his object. His wife was Jilisje Class Swits of Ziereckzee, in Hol- 
land, aunt of Class and Isaac Cornelise Swits. His descendants are 
well known here. 

Johannes Clute settled in Niskayuna in 1684, on lands he received 



1575S86 



A REMARKABLE WOMAN. 35 

by will from his rich uncle, Captain Johannes Clute of Albany. He 
married Baata, daughter of Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst, and grand-daugh- 
ter of Brant Arantse Van Slichtenhorst, who was director (head man) 
of the Colony of Rensselaerwyck in 1646, and who I have had occa- 
sion to remark, proved to be a foenian worth}' of Governor Stuyve- 
sant's most bitter animosity. She was also the grand-daughter of 
the indomitable Colonel Philip Pieterse Schuyler. In 1692 her hus- 
band Johannes, being a prisoner in Canada, this remarkable woman, 
with great adroitness, managed all his business affairs. 

Johannes Clute died November 26th, 1725, and was buried in 
Niskayuna. He left surviving him three sons and five daughters. 

Gerrit Marselis, son of Janse Marselis of Albany, married Bregie 
Hause in 1687, and the same year came to Schenectady. He, with 
his wife and one child, was killed in the massacre of February 9th, 
1690. One child named Myndert, was saved, and was living at 
Schenectady in 1709. He married Fitje Oothout of Albany, May 23, 
1 7 13. They had three sons and four daughters. Theirs is yet a 
well known name in Schenectady. 

Class iVndriese De Graff came to Schenectady in 1688. He mar- 
ried Elizabeth, daughter of William Brouwer of Albany. Soon 
after his arrival he settled on what was then and is now called the 
Hoek farm situated in the present town of Glenville. This farm 
until lately belonged to the Reese family. 

Jonathan Stevens from Connecticut, born in 1675, married July 
24th, 1693, Lea Van Slyck, widow of Class Williams Van Coppernol, 
She was a half-breed Mohawk, and often acted as interpreter. Besides 
a house lot in Schenectady, Stevens owned a farm on the north side 
of the Mohawk river, about three miles northeast of the village 
which, until recently, was occupied by some of his descendants. 

Carel Hansen Toll, a Swede, came from the island of Curacoa, 
almost directly to Schenectady, certainly as early as 1685 ; for we 
learn from the Albany records that in that year Carel Hansen Toll 
of Schenectady, was married to Lysbet Rinckhout of Albany, and 
that his daughter Neetje, was born June 20th, 1686. He first settled 
on land near Hoffman's Ferry on the north side of the Mohawk 
river, which he had bought of Hendrick Cuyler and Gerardus Cam- 



^6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

berfort ; and also occupied land opposite on the south side, purchased 
of Johannes Luykass, which last farm he conveyed to his brother-in- 
law, Tickston. 

In 1 71 2 he purchased a tract of land at Maaylwyck from Joseph 
Clement, to which he immediately removed, and some portion of 
which is still possessed by his descendants. About -this same time 
he also owned the lot in Schenectady, on the southeast corner of 
Union and Church streets, extending eastwardly along Union street, 
and including the present court house lot. This court house lot, 100 
feet front by 210 deep, he sold, September 5th, 17 12, for the sum of 
/'50, to Isaac Van Valkenburgh, the son-in-law of the old proprietor, 
Jacque Van Slyck. Carel Hansen Toll died in the month oi March, 
1728. 

The above were proprietors and residents previous to 1690. The 
hamlet was fast filling up with a peaceful, God-fearing, contented 
community, prosperous in trade and happy in their homes. 

In the sixteen years of its young life, the little settlement had 
grown into a village. Sixty houses had been built, the original fif- 
teen proprietors had increased to 800. Within the great hearths, 
roomy enough for all the old people who were wont to gather close 
and warm their blood by crackling logs, under swinging cranes, 
amid the incense of the punch brewing in the steaming kettle, in the 
dim light of the farther corners " where the good wife's shuttle mer- 
rily went flashing through the loom," and in low toned murmurs, 
broken often by happy laughter, the old, old story of young love was 
told in shadowy recesses of the great raftered room, its floors and 
ceilings fairly glowing with Holland cleanliness. The Dutchman's 
fireside was, on the eve of February 9th, 1690, radient with the hap- 
piness of humble content. He heard, but heeded not, or laughed to 
scorn the warnings that came to him again and again, of the destruc- 
tion that was sweeping down upon him. With grim sarcasm, snow 
sentinels had been posted at the north gate, and, as coldly insensate 
to danger as his icy statues, he calmly went to rest between his 
feather beds, contemptuous of fear as of the bitter cold of a wintry 
night of terrible severity. 

And while thus he slept, his implacable enemy, chattering with 



A HISTORICAL EVENT. ' 37 

the cold, no colder than his cruel heart, squatted in the snow, wait- 
ing the awful signals, that were to summon him to light and heat at 
the bonfire of the burgher's home. So came down the darkness of 
the midnight of February 9th, 1690, soon to blaze forth in the sky, 
with murderous glare, the terrible truth declared by the great Sher- 
man, "War is Hell." 



CHAPTER III. 
The Massacre. 



Very few, if any of the readers of the story of Schenectady's early 
martyrdom, have understood the real cause of the calamity. Often 
as we have read the account of it, remarkably well preserved as it is 
in what is called the Paris Documents and other records in the State 
Library at x-llbany, none of us, it may be said, have fully understood 
how all this came about. With the erudition of a thorough scholar, 
well versed in the history of the 17th century, and in a severely his- 
torical style Judge Landon, in his admirable paper, read before the 
Fortnightly club of Schenectady, has, in sixteen pages of printed 
matter, made it as clear as daylight, and from this remarkable con- 
densation of facts, we learn that all this awful horror came upon our 
ancestry from three and four thousand miles away, and that the torch 
was held and the flames were lighted by the hands of princes and 
kings of whom they knew nothing and for whom they cared less. 
Innocent, liberty-loving, God-worshipping, simple people who never 
heard or knew of the polemic wars of Europe, were tomahawked 
or stabbed, scalped or shot and thrown, dead or alive, into the flames 
roaring through doorways and windows of their own beloved homes, 
because nearly half way on the other side of the globe men were 
quarreling and fighting in the dark, over the interpretation of the 
message of the God of Love. 

James IV was driven from the throne and fled to the protection of 

4 



38 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Louis of France. William and Mary, Protestants, became King and 
Queen of England. Louis would not recognize them and war was 
declared in 1689. 

But there were other causes, and the religion of that day became 
a controlling factor. William, an elector of the States General of 
Holland, had become the leading spirit of the Augsburg League 
made between Holland, the Protestant prince of the Rhine, and the 
Catholic King of Spain, to resist the pretension of Louis. A schism 
had arisen in the Catholic Church, and the everlasting conflict 
between faith and works yet alive, was going on between Jansenist 
and Jesuit. Louis took part with the Jesuit, the man of faith. The 
Pope gave his support to the Jansenist, and the League and the Pro- 
testants sided with the Pope. War existed between Austria and 
Turkey. 

The Augsburg League became allies of Austria. France, together 
with the Jesuits, sided with Turkey. So Protestant England and 
Catholic Pope warred against the Crescent and the Crown of the 
Jesuit faction. 

The insensate war crossed the water. No Jansenist and Jesuit 
had an actual battle ground here. But the Society of Jesus had 
long been doing grand missionairy work on this side of the water, 
indeed, for more than half a century. 

The French were in great disparity of numbers. The white pop- 
ulation of Canada was only 12,000, that of the English Colonies 
more than 200,000. At any time, for one hundred years after 1660, 
could not the English, had the Colonies so willed, have crushed 
Canada out of existence ? Yet the French were always the aggres- 
sive party and punctured the English lines and spread devastation 
in their territory, apparently at will. 

To counteract the effect of this disparity, the French made allies 
of the Indians and learned their methods of warfare. They began 
with them commercially and then helped the Jesuit to convert them 
to Christianity. With the barbarian, the Jesuit had a great advan- 
tage over the Protestant. 

Ritual and ceremonial pomp and procession brought home first to 
the fancy, and then to full belief of the savage, fond of color and 



JESUIT MISSIONS. 39 

display, the idea of the unseen and only God. He needed first and 
must have evidence of a visible Presence. This the Jesuit gave him, 
and more. He gave him the sacrifice of his life, if need be, in the 
service of his Master. Judge Landon gives to these magnificent 
devotees this eloquent and deserved tribute : 

" The Jesuit priests were the missionaries, who zealously under- 
took the labor of converting the Indians. If successful, France 
would enjoy the profits of the Indian trade in times of peace, and 
have the support of the Christian, or ' praying Indians,' as they 
were called, in times of war. It must be said, to the lasting honor 
of the Jesuit missionary, that he was actuated by as consecrated and 
unselfish a devotion to his sense of duty as the annals of lofty self- 
sacrifice record. 

" A chain of Jesuit missions was established from the Gulf of 
St. Lawrence as far west as the Lake of the Woods and, in these, 
far away from civilization and the faces of white men, the Jesuit 
priests, amid the squalor, dirt, indecency and misery of the savage 
tribes, devoted their sympathy, their labor and their lives to the sal- 
vation of the souls of these unregenerate children of nature. To 
aid in snatching a dying soul from Hell's burning pit was, with 
these earnest devotees, the highest service in which life could be 
spent or sacrificed. With a self-denial that challenges the admira 
tion of mankind, these men welcomed with delight the order of their 
superior which bade them carry the emblem of the Cross to the 
heathen." 

Meanwhile the sedate Hollander, being neither Jansenist nor Jesuit, 
English nor French, having heard nothing, (and if he had heard 
would have cared nothing about the x^ugsburg League ) paid no heed 
to all these wars and rumors of wars. He wanted to be left alone 
just as in his broad toleration he left everybody else alone, to work 
out his own salvation. But he had the strong friendship and enduring 
confidence of the Iroquois, the combination of five tribes of the best 
Indians on the earth. In their disappearance the adage of the cow- 
boy is true, " The best Indian is a dead Indian." 

Along the St. Lawrence the Jesuit missionary had done splendid 
work. The savage, attracted by dazzling ritual and impressed by the 



40 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

cheerful martyrdom of the messenger of religion, had adopted the 
Catholic faith. From the great Indian castle at Caughnawauga a 
colony of Mohawks had gone to found a new Caughnawauga on the 
banks of the St. Lawrence near Montreal, and become good Catho- 
lics and with all the zeal of new converts came down to the slaugh- 
ter at Schenectady. 

From their knowledge of the lands about their old homes, they 
were of infinite service to the midnight marauder. 

The Iroquois were always the enemies of the French, who never 
succeeded in converting any considerable number of them to the 
Catholic faith. 

In 1689 King Louis sent Frontenac to Canada for the second time 
as Governor-General. He was a man of remarkable vigor and was 
a master in the art of Indian conciliation. During his absence the 
French had treated the Iroquois with shameful treachery ; the great 
tribe had captured Montreal in retaliation. With his knowledge of 
the admiration for boldness and dash and the terror it instilled in 
the Indian, he resolved at once upon a bold stroke. He summoned 
to his aid the praying Indians of New Caughnawauga and directed a 
descent upon English towns in New England and on Albany, for 
which latter point the expedition among which were the " Praying 
Indians of Caughnawauga " set out on their terrible journey. They 
turned at the confluence of the Mohawk and Hudson, and abandoned 
the attacks on Fort Orange and floundered through the deep snow to 
Schenectady. Why they did so will fully appear. 

Had they been expected, had the brave burgher seen the 
" Northern Light " that was flashing under the Polar Star, and been 
on guard, no assassin would have passed alive through the northern 
gate. 

But Schenectady owed its destruction to another cause than the 
battles of European kingdoms. Politics, fierce then as now, were the 
more inexcusable as there was then no Erie Canal in its very heart, 
to act as a powerful stimulant. In the English and French warfare 
he could and did say with Mercutio " A plague on both your houses." 
Had he felt the same indifference as to the bossism of Gov. Leisler 
he would have been at liberty to heed the call of his neighbors, to 



PREPARATIONS OF ATTACK. 41 

cease building political fences, and stand guard at the north gate. 
But, though the city was Leislerite, it was not strong enough to con- 
trol a large and powerful minority and, while thus dallying, the 
Philistines came upon him. Had the Dutch Sampson been himself 
he would have crushed the barbarian by loosing a pillar stone or 
brick of the home he loved. It was in ridicule of his political 
opponent, who kept up a ceaseless call to arms, that he was induced 
to mould his snow images beside the gates where warm hearted, 
brave men should have been. If the anti-Leislerite advocated any 
one thing the Leislerite knew, ipso facto^ that that particular thing 
was absolutely wrong. The Dutch idea once lodged is permanent. 
Once in a while the trait is discoverable yet in the tenacity of con- 
viction in the character of his descendant. So that the-Anti wanted 
the guard stationed, the simple fact that he so desired, was sufficient 
reason for leaving the little hamlet unprotected. 

Of all the numerous and authentic stories of the memorable chap- 
ter in the early history of our land, we select two, one from the 
French report from the Paris documents, vol. 14, in the State library. 

" An account of the burning of Schenectady by Mons. DeMonSig- 
nat, Comptroller-General of the marine in Canada, to Madame De 
Maintenon, the morganatic wife of Louis XIV. 

" The order received bvM. LeCompte (DeFrontenac) to commence 
hostilities against New England and New York, which had declared 
for the Prince of Orange, afforded him considerable pleasure and were 
very necessary for the country. He allowed no more time to elapse 
before carrying them into execution than was required to send off 
some dispatches to France, immediately after which, he determined 
to organize three different detachments to attack those rebels at all 
points at the same moment and to punish them at various places .for 
having afforded protection to our enemies, the Mohawks. 

"The first party was to rendezvous at Montreal, and proceed 
towards Orange; the second at Three Rivers, and to make a descent 
on New York, at some place between Boston and Orange ; and the 
third was to depart from Quebec and gain the seaboard between Bos- 
ton and Pentagouet, verging toward Acadia. They succeeded per- 
fectly well, and I have communicated to you the details. 



42 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

" The detachment which formed at Montreal, may have been com- 
posed of about two hundred and ten men, namely : eight savages 
from the Sault and La Montague, sixteen Algonquins and the 
remainder Frenchmen, all under the command of the Sieur LeMoyne 
de Sainte Helene and Lieutenant Daillebout de Mantet, both of 
whom are Canadians. 

" The Sieurs Le Moyne d'Iberville and de Montesson commanded 
under these. 

" The best qualified Frenchmen were the Sieurs de Bonrepos and 
de La Brosse, Calvinist officers, the Sieur la Moyne de Blainville, Le 
Bert du Chene and la Marque de Montigny, who all served as vol un_ 
teers. 

" They took their departure in the course of five or six days. 
They called a council to determine the route they should follow, the 
point they should attack. 

" The Indians demanded of the French their intention. Messieurs 
de Sainte Helene and the Mantet replied that they had left in the 
hope of attacking Orange, if possible, as it is the capital of New 
York, and a place of considerable importance, though they had no 
orders to that effect, but generally to act according as they should 
judge on the spot of their • chances of success, without running too 
much risk. This appeared to the savages somewhat rash. They 
represented the difficulties and the weakness of the party for so bold 
an undertaking. 

" There was even one among them, who, his mind filled with 
recollections of the disasters which he had witnessed last year, 
enquired of our Frenchmen. Since when had they become so des- 
perate ? ' 

" In reply to their raillery, 'twas answered that it was our inten- 
tion now, to regain the honor of which our misfortunes had deprived 
us, and the sole means to accomplish that, was to carry Orange, or 
to perish in so glorious an enterprise. 

" As the Indians, who had an intimate acquaintance with the 
localities and more experience than the French, could not be brought 
to agree with the latter, it was determined to postpone coming to a 
conclusion until the party should arrive at the spot where the two 



MOVEMENT OF THE ENEMY. 43 

routes separate ; the one leading to Orange, and the other to Corlaer 
( Schenectady.) In the course of the journey, which occupied eight 
days, the Frenchmen judged proper to diverge towards Corlaer, accord- 
ing to the advice of the Indians ; and their road was taken without call- 
ing a council. Nine days more elapsed before they arrived, they 
having experienced inconceivable difficulties, and having been 
obliged to march up to their knees in water, and to break the ice 
with their feet in order to find a solid footing. 

" They arrived within two leagues of Corlaer about four o'clock 
in the evening, and were harangued by the great Mohawk chief of 
the Iroquois from the Sault. He urged on all to perform their duty, 
and to lose all recollections of their fatigue, in the hope of taking 
ample revenge for the injuries they had received from the Iroquois 
at the solicitation of the English, and of washing them out in the 
blood of the traitors' enemies. 

" This savage was without contradiction the most considerable of 
his tribe, an honest man, as full of spirit, prudence and generosity, 
as is possible, and capable at the same time of the grandest under- 
takings. Shortly after, four squaws were discovered in a wigwam, 
who gave every information necessary for the attack on the town. 
The fire found in their hut served to warm those who were benumbed, 
and they continued their route, having previously detached Giguie- 
res, a Canadian, with nine Indians, on the lookout. 

" They discovered no one, and returned to join the main body 
within one league of Corlaer. 

" At eleven of the clock at night, they came within sight of the 
town but resolved to defer the assault until two o'clock of the morn- 
ing, but the excessive cold admitted of no further delay. 

" The town of Corlaer forms sort of an oblong with two gates, 
one opposite the road we had taken, the other leading to Orange, 
which is only six leagues distant. Messieurs de Sainte Helene and 
de Mantet were to enter at the first which the squaws pointed out, 
and which in fact was found open wide. Messieurs d'Iberville 
and de Montesson took the left with another detachment, in order to 
make themselves masters of that leading to Orange. But they 
could not discover it, and returned to join the remainder of the 



44 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

party. A profound silence was everywhere observed until the two 
commanders separated at their entrance, and put everyone who 
defended the place, to the sword. The massacre lasted two hours. 
The remainder of the night was spent in placing sentinels and in 
taking some repose. 

" The house belonging to the minister was ordered to be saved, so 
as to take him alive to obtain information from him ; but as it was not 
known it was not spared. He was slain and his papers burnt before 
he could be recognized. 

" At daybreak some men were sent to the dwelling of Mr. Coudre 
(Coudre Sander), who was mayor of the place, and who lived at the 
other side of the river. He was not willing to surrender, and began 
to put himself on the defensive, aided by his servants and some 
Indians ; but as it was resolved not to do him any harm, in conse- 
quence of the good treatment that the French had formerly exper- 
ienced at his hands, M. d'Iberville and the Great Mohawk proceeded 
thither alone, promised him quarter for himself, his people and his 
property, whereupon he laid down his arms on parole, entertaining 
them in his fort, and returned with them to see the commandants of 
the town. 

" In order to occupy the savages, who would otherwise have taken 
to drink, and thus render themselves unable for defense, the houses 
had already been set on fire. None were spared in the town except 
one house belonging to Coudre (Sander Glen), and that of a widow 
(Bratt), who had six children, whither M. de Montigny had been 
carried when wounded. All the rest were consumed. The lives of 
between fifty and sixty persons, old men, women and children were 
spared, they having escaped the first fury of the attack. Some 
twenty Mohawks were also spared, in order to show them that it was 
the English and not they, against whom the grudge was entertained. 

" The loss on this occasion in houses, cattle and grain, amounts to 
more than four hundred thousand livres. There were upwards of 
eighty well built and well furnished houses in the town. 

"The return march commenced with thirty prisoners. The 
wounded, who were to be carried, and the plunder, with which all 
the Indians and some Frenchmen were loaded, caused considerable 



JOURNEY SOUTHWARD. 45 

inconvenience. Fifty good horses were brought away. Sixteen of 
these only reached Montreal. The remainder were killed for food 
on the road. 

" Sixty leagues from Corlaer the Indians began to hunt, and the 
French not being able to wait for them, being short of provisions, 
continued their route, having detached Messieurs d'Iberville and 
DuChesne with two savages before them to Montreal. On the same 
day, some Frenchmen, who doubtless were much fatigued, lost their 
way. Fearful that they should be obliged to keep up with the main 
body, and believing themselves in safety, having eighty Indians in 
their rear, they were found missing from the camp. They were 
waited for the next day, until eleven o'clock, but in vain, and no 
account has since been received of them, 

" Two hours after forty more left the main body without acquaint- 
ing the commander, continued their route by themselves and arrived 
within two leagues of Montreal one day ahead, so that they were not 
more than fifty or sixty men together. The evening on which they 
should arrive at Montreal, being extremely fatigued from fasting and 
bad roads, the rear fell away from M. de Sainte Helene, who was in 
front with an Indian guide, and could not find a place suitable for 
camping, nearer than three or four leagues of the spot where he 
expected to halt. He was not rejoined by M. de Mantet and the 
others, until far advanced in the night. Seven have not been found. 
Next day on parade, about ten o'clock in the forenoon, a soldier 
arrived who announced that they had been attacked by fourteen or 
fifteen savages, and that six had been killed. The party proceeded, 
somewhat afflicted at this accident, and arrived at Montreal at 3 
o'clock p. M. 

" Such, Madame, is the account of what passed at the taking of 
Corlaer. The French lost but twenty-one men, namely four Indians 
and seventeen Frenchmen. Only one Indian and one Frenchman 
were killed at the capture of the town. The others were lost on the 
road."— Doc. Hist. N. Y., 11 86. 

A few days subsequent to the massacre Pieter Schuyler, Mtijor, 
Dirk Wessels Ten Broeck, Recorder, and Killian Van Rensselaer, 
the patroon, addressed an appeal to the Governor of Massachusetts, 



46 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

from which we quote, putting as well as possible, the English of that 
day into our modern vernacular. 

"Albany, the 15th day of Feb., 1689. 
HoNERED Gentlemen : 

To our great grief and sorrow we must acquaint you with our 
deplorable condition, there never having been the like dreadfull 
massacre and murder committed in these parts of America, as has 
been acted by the French and their Indians at Schenectady, twenty 
miles from Albany, between Saturday and Sunday last, at 11 o'clock 
at night. A company of two hundred French and Indians fell upon 
said village and murdered sixty men, women and children, most bar- 
barousl}', burning the place and carrying twenty-seven along with 
them prisoners, among which, the Lieut, of Capt. Bull Enos Tal- 
madge, and four more cf said company were killed and five taken 
prisoners. The rest being inhabitants, and above twenty-five per- 
sons freezing their limbs in the fight. 

" The cruelties committed at this place no pen can write, nor 
tongue express, the women with child ripped up, and the children 
thrown into the flames, and their heads dashed in pieces against the 
doors and windows. 

" But what shall we say ? We nnist lay our hands upon our 
mouths and be silent. It is God's will and pleasure and we must 
submit. It is but what our sins and transgressions have deserved. 
Since human things are generally directed by outward means, so we 
must ascribe this sad misfortune to the factions and divisions which 
were amongst tlie people, and their great disobedience to their offi- 
cers, for they would obe}- no commands or keep any watch, so that 
the enemy having discovered their negligence and security by their 
praying Maquase Indians (who were in said place two or three days 
before the attack was made) came in and broke open their very doors 
before any soul knew of it, the enemy dividing themselves in three 
several companies, came in at three several places no gate being shut, 
and separated themselves six and seven to a house, and in this man- 
ner begun to murder, sparing no man till the}- saw all the houses 
open and mastered, and so took what plunder they would, loading 



REPORT OF MASSACRE. 47 

thirty or forty of the best horses, and so went away about 11 o'clock 
at noon on the Sabbath day. 

" It was, as if the heavens combined for the destruction of the 
village. That Saturday night the snow fell above knee deep, the 
weather was dreadfully cold, and the poor people that escaped and 
brought us the news about break of day, did so much increase the 
number of the enemy, that we all concluded that there was a consid- 
erable army coming to fall upon our city, and as was affirmed, they 
were upon their march hither ; we were being told not only then 
but that day that there were 1900 at least. We sent out a few horses 
forthwith, after we had received the news, but scarcely could they 
get through the deep snow, some wherefore got to that desolate 
place, and there being some few Maquase here in town, we got them 
to go thither with our men in companies, to send messengers in 
all haste to the Maquase castle, and to spy where the enemy went, 
who were not very free to go, the snow being so deep, and afraid of 
being discovered by their tracks, but coming to the village which 
was in such a consternation, there being so many people and cattle 
killed and burnt, that it was not effected until two days after, when 
we heard that the Maquase knew nothing about it, upon which mes- 
sengers were sent, and the Maquase of the first and second castles came 
down in twenty-four houres, whom we sent out with some of our 
young men in pursuit of the enemy. Afterwards the Maquase of the 
third castle came down, who were also sent out, but we are afraid 
will not overtake them, and which is worse if they do find them, 
fear they will do them no great hurt, the Indians amongst them 
being of the kindred of our Indians ; for the policy of the French is 
so great, that they declared to some of the Maquase, whom they 
found at Schenectady, that they would not do the Maquase any harm, 
yea, if they should burn and destroy ever so many houses at Canada, 
and kill ever so. many French, yet they would not touch a hair of 
their head ; for their governor had such an inclination to that people 
that he would live in peace with them. Nay, to gain the hearts of 
the Maquase, whatever they desired at Schenectady was granted to 
the women and children that were left alive. Upon their desire they 
were released and saved. The very houses where the Maquase lay 



48 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

were saved upon tlieir request, so that they left no stone nnturned to 
bring the Indians to their devotion. 

" The forty Maquase that were out as scouts at the lake, whom we 
furnished with powder and lead to lie there on purpose, we must 
conclude, have known nothing of the enemy's coming, for they had 
posted themselves at one of the passages, and before they had sent 
men to the other passage the enemy had passed by, which we must 
impute to their negligence. 

" The said French had belts of wampum along with them which 
they showed to a Maquase squaw at Schenectady, which they 
designed to have given to our Indians, upon proposal of peace, if 
they had met with any upon the wa}', so that we must conclude they 
wanted nothing but a peace with our Indians to destroy all the 
parts. 

" Our Maquase have got one of their Indians prisoner, whom they 
have tortured and afterwards have released him, but delivered him 
into our custody ; for we feared that he would escape and run away 
to the enemy. The said Indian confessed that there were 600 men 
preparing to come out upon this place or New England, and 100 
men were gone out against Skachkook Indians, which were beside 
these 200 men, and that this company had been twenty-two days 
away from Canada. 

" After the French had done the principal mischief at Schenec- 
tady, Captain Sanders, a justice that lived across the river, was sent 
for by the captain of the French, who had put himself in a posture 
of defense in his fort with the men that he could get by him ; when 
thirteen came there and told them not to fear for their order was not 
to wrong a chicken of theirs, upon which Captain Sanders ordered 
them to lay down their arms, and so were let in where they left one 
man for a hostage, and Captain Sanders went to their commander, 
who told him he had a commission to come and pay a debt which 
they owed ; Colonel Dongan, our governor, had stirred up our Indians 
to do mischief in Canada, and they had done the same here. And 
pulling his commission out of his bosom told him he was strictly 
charged to do no harm to him or his, but especially to his wife who 
had since been so charitable to the French prisoners, so that Captain 



LIST OF KILLED. 49 

Sanders saved sundry houses from being burnt, and women and chil- 
dren from being carried away. But the snow was so extremely deep 
that it was impossible for any woman to march a mile, so that they 
took none but men and boys that could march." 

The Hon. John Sanders, a descendant of John Alexander Glen, 
known as M. Coudre, and whose narration is not tradition, but relia- 
ble information, derived from his father, who was born 150 years 
ago, and who derived it in turn from his grandfather, furnishes some 
interesting incidents which we take from his most interesting work. 
In his accounts of John Alexander Glen, we find the cause of the 
tenderness of the French toward the Major, or chief burgomaster as 
Glen then was. 

Adam Vrooman's life was spared after his wife was killed, and his 
child's brains dashed out against his house, which stood on the cor- 
ner of Front and Church streets, where Mr. Charles Linn now lives. 
We have given the story in the account of his life as we have of the 
first settlers. Had the burghers been on guard under the leadership 
of a man like Vrooman they would have torn the assassins to pieces. 

The following is a list of the killed, wounded and the prisoners. 
It is entirely correct, all accounts agreeing on the number. It is 
taken from Vol. i. Doc. Hist, of N. Y., p. 304. 

It will be noticed that the largest number of the slain resided 
when living, on State street, hence the survivors called this street 
Martelaer's street, in pious remembrance of their slaughtered rela- 
tives and neighbors, a name whose significance and sentiment are in 
striking contrast with the utter poverty of invention and good taste, 
shown by their descendants in borrowing a name from Albany for 
their chief business street. 

List of the people killed and destroyed by the French of Canada 
and their Indians at Schenectady, twenty miles to the west of 
Albany, between Saturday and Sunday, the 9th day of February, 
1690. 

" Myndert Wemple killed." 

He was the eldest son of Jan Barentse Wemple, who owned half 
the great island west of the town, and who died in 1663, leaving 
another son, Barent, and two daughters. 



5° 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Myndert's house lot was on the west side of Washington street, a 
little north of State street. His son, Johannes, was carried away to 
Canada but was redeemed and lived many years. 

" Jan Van Eps and his son and two of his children killed." 
Jan Van Eps was the only son of Dirk Van Eps and Maritie 
Damens. The father died early and the mother married two hus- 
bands afterwards, the last of whom was Cornells Van Nes of Albany. 
With Jan Van Eps were also killed three of his children, and a fourth, 
Jan Baptist, then seventeen years of age, was carried away by the 
French. He remained with the Indians three years, but finally 
escaped in one of their excursions against the Mohawks. On 
account of his familiarity with the langauge of the natives, he was 
often employed by the governor of the province as an interpreter. 

The Van Eps house lot was on the north corner of Church and 
State streets and embraced about 200 feet on each street. The east 
half, including the corner, was early sold to the Bratts. It is prob- 
able that Van Eps resided upon the west half at the time of the 
massacre. 

" Sergeant Church of Captain Bull's company." 
" Barent Janse (Van Ditmars) killed and burnt ; his son killed." 
His son's name was Cornells, a young man of mature age, the hus- 
band of Catharina Glen, daughter of Sander Leendertse Glen. The 
elder Van Ditmars in 1664, married Catalyntje DeVos, widow of 
Arent Andriese Bratt, one of the earliest settlers of Schenectady, by 
whom she had six children, all living at the time of her second 
marriage. 

At the time of the massacre she was living with her family on 
her village lot, on the east corner of Washington and State streets, 
and it was there that Van Ditmars and his son Cornells were slain. 

" Andries Arentse Bratt shot and burnt and also his child," (one 
child.) 

He was the eldest son of Arent Andriese Bratt and Catalyntje De 
Vos above mentioned, and lived on the same ample lot (200 feet 
square) as his mother, on the north side of State street. In the mas- 
sacre his wife, Margarette Jacobse Van Slyck, and two children were 
spared. 



LIST OF KILLED CONTINUED. 51 

" Maria Viele, wife of Dowe Aukes and lier two children killed) 
and his negro woman, Francyn, Maria Aloff, wife of Cornells Viele, 
Junior, shot." 

These five persons were killed in one house, standing on the south 
corner of Mill Lane and State street next the ancient church. Aukes 
kept an inn there. Viele was an uncle of his wife and subsequently 
became heir of his property. 

At the same time Arnout Cornelise Viele, brother of Aukes' wife, 
was carried to Canada. 

" Swear Teunise (Van Velsen) shot and burnt. His wife killed 
and burnt. Antje Jans, daughter of Jan Spoor, killed and burnt. 
Item : four negroes of the said Swear Teunise the same death., Enos 
Talmage, Lieutanant of Capt. Bull, killed and burnt. All in one 
house." 

Van Velson's house was next east of Dowe Auke's above men- 
tioned, on the south side of State street, now numbers 54 and 56. 
He was the town miller, and directly in the rear of his house stood 
his corn mill on Mill Lane. 

As he died without heirs, his estate was divided among his wife's 
children, the Wemps, a portion being reserved for the church. 

" Hend. Meese Vrooman and Bartholomeus Vrooman, killed and 
burnt. Item : two negroes of Hen. Meese the same death." 

He lived on the south side of State street, where the New York 
Central Railroad crosses. All the Vroomans in this vicinity are his 
descendants through his two sons, Adam and Jan. 

" Gerrit Marcellis and his wife and child killed." 

He was a son of Marsellis Janse of Albany. At the time of his 
death he was residing on the lots now occupied by McCamus & Co's 
stores. 

" Rob Alexander, soldier of Capt. Bull's, shot." 

He was probably quartered in the block house at the north angle 
of the village at the corner of Front and Washington streets. 

" Robert Hessling," residence unknown. " Sander, the son of 
Gilbert Geritse (Van Brakel,) killed and burnt." 

He lived on the east corner of Ferry and State streets. 

" Jan Roeloffse DeGoyer, burnt in the house. He was a son of 



52 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

the famous Anneke Janse, and lived upon the lot of Mr. G. Y. Van 
de Bogart, opposite the Court House. He left no descendants." 

" Ralph Grant, a soldier in the fort, shot." 

" David Christoffelse and his wife, with four children, all burnt in 
their house." 

His house lot was on the east side of Church street. He was the 
son of Christoffel Davids of Albany, an Englishman by birth. 

" Joris Aertse (Vander Baas), shot and burnt. Wm, Pieterse, 
killed." 

His house lot was on the south corner of Church and Union 
streets. 

"John Putman, killed ; his wife killed and her scalp taken off." 

His house lot was on the south corner of Ferry and Union streets 
where Mr. Barney now lives. 

He was the ancestor of the Putmans of this vicinity. 

" Domine Petrus Tassemaker, the minister, killed and burnt in his 
house." 

" Frans Harmense (Van de Bogart) killed." 

His house lot was on Front street and near the north gate. 

" His son Claas was carried away, but after^vards redeemed." 

" Engel, the wife of Adam Vrooman, shot and burnt, her child's 
brains dashed out against the wall." 

Her maiden name was Engeltie Blom. Vrooman's house stood on 
the lot on the west corner of Front and Church streets. 

His son Barent and a negro were carried away to Canada. 

" Reynier Schaats and his son killed." 

He was a son of Domine Gideon Schaats of x'Vlbany, surgeon and 
physician of the village, as well as Justice of Peace. His lot was on 
the north side of Union street, now owned by the County of Schenec- 
tady. 

" Daniel Andreis and George, two soldiers of Capt. Bull." " A 
French girl, prisoner among the IMohawks, killed." "Johannes, 
the son of Symon Schermerhorn." 

He probably lived on the west corner of Church and Union 
streets, where Mr. Parsons now lives. 

List of the persons which the French and their Indians have taken 



THOSE TAKEN PRISONER 53 

prisoners at Schenectady and carried to Canada, the 9th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1690, Johannes Teller and his negroes. 

The Teller lot was on the east corner of Union and Washington 
streets, extending 200 feet along each street. 

Teller was redeemed from the Indians. 

"John Wemp, son of Myndert Wemp and two negroes." 

This Wemps (Wemples) lived on the west side of Washington 
avenue, a little north of State street. 

" Symon, Abraham, Phillip, Dyrck and Claas Groot, all five sons 
of Symon Groot." 

His house lot was next west of Reynier Schaat's, on the north 
side of Union street, now owned by the county of Schenectady and 
Scott Hunter, Esq. All these were redeemed with perhaps the 
exception of Claas. 

"Jan Baptist, son of Jan Van Eps." 

The Van Eps lot was on the^north corner of Church and State 
streets. Jan remained among the Canadian Indians about three 
years, and in one of their expeditions against the Mohawks escaped 
and returned home. 

"Albert and Johannes Vedder, sons of Harme Vedder." 

Harmen Vedder, the father, had a homestead on the bouwland, now 
occupied and owned by Mr. John D. Campbell of Rotterdam, and it 
is not certainly known that he had a village lot. Both were redeemed- 

" Isaac Cornelise Switts and his eldest son." 

He lived on the west side of Washington street directly opposite 
State street. Both were redeemed. 

" A negro of Barent Janse (Van Ditmars)." 

Van Ditmars married Mrs. Bratt in 1664 and lived upon the lot on 
the east corner of State and Washington streets. 

" Arnout, the son of Arnout Corn ; Viele, the interpreter." 

Arnout was a brother-in-law of Douwe Aukes and was residing at 
his house on the south corner of State street and Mill Lane near the 
church. 

" Stephen, the"son of Gysbert Gerritse ( Van Brakel)." 

Van Brakel resided on the east corner of Ferry and State streets. 

5 



54 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

" Lawrence, son of Claas Lawrence Purmurent ( Vander Volgen)." 

The Vander Volgen home lot included the lots on which are built 
the Van Horn hall and the Myers block. 

Lawrence remained with the Canadian Indians about eleven years, 
becoming perfectly familiar with their language and customs. After 
his return he was employed as provincial interpreter. 

" Arnout, son of Paulyne Janse ;" residence unknown. " Barent, 
the son of Adam Vrooman, and the negro." " Claas, son of Frans 
Marmense (Van de Bogart)." 

His father's village lot was on the north side of Front street, now 
the residence of Mrs. Henry Rosa. 

" Stephen, adopted son of Geertje Bonts ; " residence unknown. 
" John Webb, a soldier belonging to Capt. Bull." 

Judge Sanders gives some interesting data from which we extract : 

" It occurred about the time of the accession of William and 
Mary, when Jacob Leisler, a wealthy merchant and influential poli- 
tician of New York, had usurped the government in their names ; 
and backed up by the popular Protestant frenzy, that all those who 
had held office under James, were Baptists, removed every old officer, 
and appointed the devotees of himself and son-in-law, Milborne, in 
their stead. It was truly a time of disobedience, distraction, wild 
riot and disorder. Schenectady itself was strongly Leislerian. I 
wish not to enter into details, but it is clearly a matter of history 
and tradition that John Alexander Glen, commandant of the place, 
and a justice of the township, residing at Scotia, was not allowed to 
enter the village under any circumstances, his life threatened, and in 
derision of his advice to guard and close the gates ; so great was 
their confidence of security from attack in the depth of that unusu- 
ally severe winter, that the Leislerians formed men of snow and set 
one at each gate, as a sufficient protection. Captain Alexander Glen, 
John Alexander's brother, a resident of the village, and also justice 
of the peace, was obliged to take refuge at Albany; and many prom- 
inent men of the province were compelled to seek an asylum in New 
England. 

" There was, at the time of the conflagration and massacre, a gar- 
rison of twenty-four men ( to whom the Leislerians were inimical), 



A NEW FORT. 55 

stationed at a point now called the Old Fort, sitnated at the jnnction 
of what is now Front, Ferry and Green streets, under Lieut. Enos 
Talmadge of Connecticut. From the earliest date of its erection, 
this spot, and none other, of Schenectady, has been designated as 
the Fort. It was destroyed in 1690; a new fort was built in 1700, 
rebuilt in 1735 and again in 1780. I have been unable to ascertain 
from any source what was the precise extent of the fort. The 
parade ground embraced the small public square, and some vacant 
lots lying between Front street and the premises now belonging 
to and occupied by the Episcopal church. 

" Although called a Fort, it seems, from investigations made by 
me, to have been the barrack station of an exposed frontier town, 
but probably mounted a few cannon. I am not clear about that. 

" The people of the town were so bigoted to Leisler that they 
would not obey any of the magistrates, neither would they entertain 
the soldiers sent thither by the convention at all ; nothing but men 
sent from Leisler would do their turn ; and when Capt. Sander com- 
manded, they threatened to burn him upon the fire if he came upon 
guard. 

" From all the accounts rendered, that winter night of February 
8th must have been one of extreme suffering and heart-rending deso- 
lation ; but all of its inhabitants were neither slaughtered nor cap- 
tured. Schenectady then contained eighty dwellings ; assuming that 
each house held five individuals (a moderate estimate), it must have 
contained about 400 inhabitants. And what became of them ? 
They escaped, it is true, but where ? It is idle to suppose, as has 
been sometimes stated, that they fled twenty miles off to Albany in 
their night garments, on that severe night, with the snow more than 
a foot deep." 

No, there is too much romance in that commonly received opinion, 
and it is not borne out by the knowledge of the settlers. They fled 
off too, and were protected by their friends and nearest neighbors. 
The Mohawk flats, on both sides of the river, were settled as far west 
as to what is now called Hoffman's Ferry, and down the river east on 
both sides to the manor line, and the Ael Plaas creek. There is but 



56 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

one authenticated and believed case of flight and arrival at Albany, 
during that terrible night of storm and misery. 

Simon Schermerhorn, (the brother of Ryer), at five o'clock on the 
morning of the 9th, brought the sad news to Albany by the way of 
Niskayuna. He had himself been shot through the thigh, and his 
horse wormded in the daring effort. It was a noble struggle of life 
and death to rescue his distressed friends and relatives. On that 
disastrous night, too, his son John and three negro slaves were 
killed before he escaped. 

It is said, in our home accounts, that only one of the enemy, 
" Lieut. La Margue de Montigny," was injured during the sack, and 
that was by the thrust of a spear in the hands of the intrepid Adam 
Vrooman. This is more than the French account, and indeed, in 
the then troubled state of the Province, our own accounts are sparse, 
mixed and unsatisfactory. I find the account of Monsieur de Mon- 
seignat. Comptroller General in Canada, addressed to Madame de 
Maintenon (Paris Doc. IV, Doc. His. N. Y., Vol. i, p. 297, etc.), much 
more lucid, satisfactory and historical, and so nearly agreeing with 
the statements, handed down by the Glens and other survivors of 
that dreadful occasion, that I adopt it as the most reliable and correct 
relation. 



CHAPTER IV. 
After the Massacre. 



It was all over before the dawn of a bitter winter's morning. But 
the servants of his most Christian Majesty, and his convert allies, 
the praying Indians had work yet to do, the Frenchmen to round up 
and corral the prisoners, and the barbarians to revert to their savage 
flesh pots by counting up and distributing the unburned scalps. 
Major Coudre was sent for and he promptly came. It was the first 
time for many long months that this man who, with Ryer Schermer- 



FOLLOWING THE MASSACRE. 57 

horn, the Bradts, Van Sl3^cks and Vroonians was the leading citizens 
of the little burgh, was permitted within the gates. He was an anti- 
Leislerite, had been among those who had long sounded the warning 
of the evil night, and had been laughed to scorn. He was welcome 
enough now, and in the midst of an awful scene, surrounded by 
happy homes, converted into ash heaps, with only six out of sixty 
dwellings remaining, and these six standing sparse .and scattered 
stained with the awful carnage of the dead around their doorway, 
and black with the smoke of their neighbors smouldering beside 
them, in the hour of the horrible fulfilment of his warning, the gal- 
lant gentleman with streaming eyes besought mercy for the sur- 
vivors. Further bloodshed was checked, some actually saved to 
endure a frightful journey to the Canadian captivity, some to return 
long 3'ears after, some to die on the death strewn route, some never 
to be heard of again. The heroic Ryer Schermerhorn came back 
from Albany, one son of Arent Andreas Bradt survived, and these 
two were all that were left to represent the original five trustees. 

When the unhappy cavalcade left through the north gate to floun- 
der through snow and in Arctic cold to their dismal destination, 
those who had escaped to the surrounding country straggled back to 
take counsel among themselves of the cheerless, hopeless future. 
Added to their misery were the everlasting harpys who in Albany 
and New Amsterdam were hissing the inhumanly conceited mutter 
"I told you so," into the ears of the anguished sufferers who were 
sobbing and moaning with streaming eyes over the ashes of their 
homes and the charred and scalpless remains of their beloved dead. 
They began to give up in desolute despair. 

To the everlasting honor of that most ungentle and warlike sav- 
age, the first words of consolation, of encouragement and hope 
came, not from their Christian brethren, but from the Mohawk, the 
the noblest barbarian of them all. Straightaway from their castle 
the Sachems of the Maquase dispatched the following letter to the 
Mayor of Albau}^ : 

February 25th, 1690. 

" Proposition made by the Sachems of the Maquase Castles to the 
Mayor, etc., of the City of Albany. 



58 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

25th day of February, 1690. 

" Brethren : — We are sorry and extremely grieved for the murder 
lately committed by the French upon our brethren of Schenectady. 
We esteem this evil as if done to ourselves, being all in one cove- 
nant chain. 

" We lament and condole the death of so many of our brethren, 
so basely murdered at Schenectady, we cannot account it a great 
victory for it is done by way of deceit. 

" Brethren : — Do not be discouraged, this is but a beginning of the 
war ; we are strong enough. The whole house have their eyes fixed 
upon yours, and they only stay your motion and will be ready to do 
whatever shall be resolved upon by yoiir brethren. 

" We recommend the brethren to keep good watch, and if any 
enemies come take care that messengers be more speedily sent to us 
than lately was done. We would not advise the brethren to quite 
desert Schenectady, but to make a fort there. The enemy would.be 
too glorious to see it quite desolate, and the town is not well fortified, 
the stockades are so short the Indians can jump over them like a 
dog."— Doc. Hist. II. 

Again on May 3d, 1690, in council, the Five Nations under the 
inspiration of the Mohawks, sent out these brave and cheering words 
to Van Corlear. 

" Brother Corlear be no wise discouraged, but make your fort 
strong (as we have our castles) at Schenectady, and maintain a garri- 
son there, that your corn may be preserv'ed and reap your harvest, 
also send for your wives and children from New York and encour- 
age them that we shall be safe, and fear not. The words of Diado- 
rus are ended." 

And on the 2 2d day of February, 1690, the Convention at Albany 
called on the brave allies of the burghers. 

And they came. Their names are on the rolls of membership of 
the Old Dutch Church, and their blood was again diffused through 
Holland names. 

Well may the Van Slycks, the Vielies, the Bradts, the descendants 
of " Taut " Stevens, of " Stoefile " and " Tellis " Yates, and hundreds 
of others of the old stock, admit without shame, and claim with 



AN ORDER ISSUED. 



59 



pride the remote ancestry, that though barbarian in birth, was 
humane in heart, and applied with brave tenderness the Master's 
Golden Rule. 

Staggering to his feet and summoned to manly effort by these 
words of encouragement, the Dutchman met the emergency. Leis- 
ler's commissioners at Albany, the very year of the massacre, issued 
the following order : 

" Whereas, it is judged necessary that in order to defend Schenec- 
tady and to that purpose it is found necessary and requisite that a 
fort shall be erected to defend the inhabitants and oppugn the enemy 
if they should attack the same. 

" These are in his Master's name to require your Capt. Sander 
Glen and all officers and inhabitants belonging to the said Schenec- 
tady and adjacent parts, with the soldiers there in garrison, to build 
a substantial fort of due magnitude and strength, upon that part or 
parcel of ground (called by the name of Cleyn Isaacs), and that all 
are aiding and assisting therein, according to their ability to dispatch 
and complete the same, as they will answer the contrary at their 
utmost peril. 

" Given under our hand this 13th day of May in the second year 
of his Master's reign. Anno Dom, 1690." 

This was built between Washington street and the river opposite 
the west end of State street, covering the lot of Klein Isaac, (that is 
Isaac Swits), who with his son Cornells, was carried away by the 
French to Canada. On his return from captivity next year, he found 
his homestead occupied by soldiers, his orchard cut down and his 
home utterly ruined. He repeatedly petitioned for remuneration for 
his losses, but it was not until 1708 that his son received a patent for 
1,000 acres of land .in Niskayuna as a recognition of his father's 
claim. 

In obedience to this command for this fort, there is an excellent 
map made by the Rev. John Miller, chaplain to the British forces, 
stationed in New York. He gives this description of Schenectady: 
" Dependent on this City (Albany) and about twenty miles north- 
ward from it, is the Fort of Schenectady, quadrangular, with a treble 
stockade with a new block house at every angle and in each block 



6o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

house two great guns." (Miller's description of Schenectady, 1695). 

Miller's map of New York city is fully supported by contempo- 
raneous and later maps. His map of Schenectady is doubtless cor- 
rect in all essentials. Certainly after two centuries have elapsed the 
sketch of what an intelligent man observed and recorded, is entitled 
to acceptance, unless some other contemporaneous plan or detailed 
description can be found. Rev. John Miller was chaplain to the 
British forces stationed at New York City. He visited all the up- 
river posts and returned to England in 1695. His manuscript 
" Description of the Province and the City of New York, with plans 
of the city and several forts as they existed in the year 1695. By 
the Rev. John Miller, London. Printed and published for the 
enlightenment such as would desire information anent the New 
Found Land of America," is in the British Museum. 

The stockade therein depicted was probably in the main on the 
site of the stockade destroyed in 1690, and represented the growth of 
five years. The first fort or strong place built after the massacre on 
Cleyn Isaac's land, was the blockhouse at the foot of State street, 
(formerly Mrs. Jay Westinghouse's lot), where it dominated the 
bouwland and Great Island, and was guarded by the then bluff banks 
of Mill Creek and the Benne Kil. It was a purely military position, 
a blockhouse to which the few remaining settlers could rally, and 
probably became the southwest blockhouse of Miller's map. 

The guard house was at State and Ferry streets, and was a block- 
house also. The writer believes that the same garrison was at this 
point on the night of the massacre, and many of those who escaped 
from their house naturally ran to the guard house and were there 
killed, a good enough reason why State street from Center to Wash- 
ington street should be called Martyrlaer street. This blockhouse 
was at State and Ferry streets. " Two great guns " commanded the 
road to Albany, the town mill and bouwlands as well as the plain 
east of Ferry street. 

Miller's -map shows the "spy loft," or lookout station (where 
perched high up the lookout could see all that was in sight m the 
vicinity and give the signal of danger), the " center box " and flag 
staff, which indicate the main and headquarters. It was put there 



OTHER BLOCKHOUSES. 6i 

because it was the best site in 1691, and the site was the same in 
1690 and earlier 

Another blockhouse was about 100 feet north of the Episcopal 
church, to which point Front street originally ran, that is to say 
when it was the Rondweg inside the north wall. 

A fourth blockhouse was about Washington and Front streets, and 
was larger than the others. Protected by being near the junction of 
the river and the Benne Kil it was probably intended for a storehouse 
as well as church. 

At the massacre the town was destroyed, but few houses being 
unburnt the site was practically abandoned and only the strenuous 
efforts of government and Indians induced the return of the major 
portion of the people. A large number of Mohawks established 
themselves there, and the following summer they gathered the crops 
which had been planted — (winter wheat.) Miller's map shows their 
two large " long houses" inside the walls. The tripple stockade was 
probably built by, or with the aid of the Indians and in their fashion 
of light poles or saplings, and not the regular stockade of civilized 
peoples. 

Miller's map shows twenty-eight houses within the stockade in 
1695. 

In 1698, the population of the township from Niskayuna to Hoff- 
man's Ferry, was fifty men, forty-one women and 133 children. 

Of these the Glens, Schermerhorn, DeGraffs and others lived at a 
distance from the village, so that if the forty-one women represented 
nearly as many families, which is probable, twenty-eight houses 
would suffice for the inhabitants, the soldiers barracking in the block 
houses. 

The " Fort of Schenectady " doubtless contained all there was of 
the village, save a few houses on the Albany road, on the bouwlands 
and was the whole occupied town west of Ferry street. 

Miller indicates two gates — one the south end of Church street, 
where its location protected it from sudden attack, and where the 
ancient church covered, or in military parlance, traversed it. The 
writer believes, after careful study of the site and the history of the 



62 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

town, that this south gate located at twenty-eight feet south of State 
street, was the early outlet of the town. 

On passing out of the gate the road to Alban}-, via. Norman's Kil, 
(the oldest road), lay across the bouwlands and via. Schernierhorn 
mills, over the hills. Later to avoid the sand and the hill, the road 
up to Albany hill was traveled. It was for a century a mere trail, 
in common with others equally poor, but occasionally used. This 
road led from the gate along the hill side under the guns of the 
southeast blockhouse and above the mill. ( In digging cellars and 
foundations for Vrooman's hardware store, stone macadamizing or 
pavement was found seventy-five feet south of State street, as also at 
other houses along the same block at other times). 

It was improbable that any man with a militar)- eye would locate 
a blockhouse back from the steep bluff bank of Mill Creek. It 
would be placed on the crest so that the guns of the blockhouse 
could fully command the whole slope. Again, a road along under 
such a slope would be in proper position for its protection, but very 
wet and muddy in spring or in wet weather, hence it was paved very 
early but abandoned for the higher level where State street now is, 
probably not long after the Queen's Fort was built in 1704. When 
the road was moved, the gate was moved, and the English army top- 
ographers at the time of the " old French war " locate the road as 
State street now is, and open a gate at its crossing of Ferr}' street. 

Miller indicates another gate at the west side (corner of Washing- 
ton avenue and State), which opened to the Benne Kil, which was a 
canoe harbor — to the ferry — to the Great Island, and also on the old 
river road to the Mohawk country. There had been a gate at the 
north end of the town, but after 1690 it was not rebuilt, as the small 
garrison had enough to do to guard the south end of the town, 
which contained the mill, guard house and gardens, and the roads to 
the bouwlands and Albany. 

The next tendency seemed to be to concentrate force at the State 
street side of the town, and new buildings clustered about the neigh- 
borhood. Besides settlements were neither near or numerous along 
the Mohawk and the Indian incursions made roads there verv unsafe. 



FOUNDERS OF OLD FAMILIES. " 63 

As the need for them arose, and their safety was assured, new gates 
were opened. 

Meanwhile others came to Schenectady who were the founders of 
families well known among our people in these days. 

Ahasuerus Marselis, brother of Garret, came in 1698. William 
Hull came about April 13th, 1695. John Oudikirk in the same 
year. Giles Van Voast in 1699. John Mynderse in 1700. 

He owned real estate on the west corner of Mill Lane and State 
street, and the lot now No. 93 State street and east of it. He died 
in 1757, aged about 90 years, and left surviving him three sons and 
one daughter. 

Jilis Fonda, son of Douw Jellisse of Albany, born in 1670, married 
December nth, 1695, Rachel, daughter of Peter Winne of Albany. 
He came to Schenectady in 1700, and was a gunsmith. He died in 
1737 and left surviving him a numerous and historic family of child- 
ren, who have contributed much to the healthy and respectable pop- 
ulation of Schenectady, Montgomery and Fulton counties. 

The descendants of this man, who was the ancestor of all the 
Fondas in the county, have contributed some splendid names to 
Colonial and Revolutionary history. Jellis was an officer of rank and 
merit under the King. Jellis J., a soldier of renown in the Revolu- 
tion. The Fondas were among men who attained a remarkable age. 

John Quackenbos came in 1700 to Niskayuna and was the ances- 
tor of all that name (now spelled Quackenbush), residing here and 
west of the city. 

These names are given as those who came here at the close of the 
seventeenth century. Others are on record, but the family names 
have died out and blood run out. It is those only whose continual 
residence, from ancestor to children here, is of two hundred years' 
duration, of whom mention has been made. Many who attained 
high rank and station came in the i8th and r9th centuries whose 
ancestral record will be given in the history of Schenectady in those 
centuries. 

Meanwhile for the decade that closed the record of 1600 the 
unhappy little burgh struggled and suffered into new life and 
strength. The awful experience had taught caution, but had shat- 



64 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

tered nerve. Defences were strengthened in the city. Troops, usu- 
ally a company of infantry with the wretched artillery appliances of 
that day, garrisoned the place. No descent on the town in the dark- 
ness of midnight, upon sleeping citizens, was possible ever more, 
but the vigilance was wearisome and for a long time the feeling of 
unrest could not be calmed down. 

The renewal of the stockades, which, made of pine logs, 
lasted but five or six years, became very burthensome to the inhabi- 
tants of the village after its destruction in 1690. Having built a 
new fort in 1690 they were ordered to renew the palisades in 1695. 
On this occasion Reyer Schermerhorn refused to cut and draw his 
proportion of the logs. It may be because living at the mills, he 
thought himself exempt from this burthensome service, or that his 
quota was too large. Thereupon Justice Johannes Sanders Glen fined 
him twelve shillings, but as he continued contumacious Governor 
Fletcher, on the 9th of April, 1698, directed the sheriff of Albany 
county to bring him before the Council in New York to answer for 
his conduct. On the 30th he appeared before the council and " stood 
upon his vindication," whereupon he was "committed to answer at 
the next Supreme Court, and Colonel Courtlandt was desired to take 
bond with sureties for his appearance, and that he be of good behav- 
iour in the mean time." 

In the winter of 1695-6 the garrison at Schenectady consisted of a 
detachment under command of Lieutenant Bickford, from the com- 
panies of Captain James Weens and Williams Hyde, stationed at 
Albany. "On the loth of January, about 12 o'clock at night the 
whole guard, except one deserted, and others to the number of six- 
teen, broke through the northwest blockhouse next the water side." 
(Benne Kil). 

" They drew the guns of both powder and shot. The Lieutenant 
about two o'clock, discovering their desertion, notified by express 
Colonel Richard Ingoldsby at Albany, and with ten volunteers of the 
inhabitants and eleven soldiers started in pursuit. The sergeant and 
seven red coats soon gave out and were left behind. At four in the 
afternoon the Lieutenant and his fourteen men came up with the 
sixteen deserters, ordering them to lay down their arms. They 



DESERTERS SHOT. 65 

answered with a volley, and both sides continued to fire until five of 
the deserters were killed and two wounded, when the remainder sur- 
rendered." 

These facts were stated by Lieutenant Bickford in his account of 
the affair to Governor Fletcher, of March 9th. In closing his dis- 
patch he says : " Here is a strong and regular fort built by the 
inhabitants with foot works and a stone magazine fit for this garri- 
son." The following were the volunteers from Schenectady who 
accompanied Lieutenant Bickford in his hazardous enterprise : " Har- 
man Van Slyck, Ensign of the train bands of Schenectady, and Gerrit 
Simons Veeder, Peter Simons Veeder, Albert Veeder, Gerrit Gysbert 
(Gysberts Van Brakel), Jan Danielse Van Antwerpen, Dirck Groot, 
Jonas DeRoy, John Wemp, Daniel Mutchcraft (Mascraft) and Thomas 
Smith." 

At a court martial held in Schenectady April 21st, the survivors of 
the deserting party were accounted guilty and condemned to be shot. 

But out in the suburbs and in remote Casligione, as Niskayuna 
was called, on the bouwlands of what is now Rotterdam and in 
Glenoilly, the musket was as necessary as the plow and no man dare 
leave his family alone. As we shall see throughout three-quarters 
of the following century Schenectady was on the frontier and until 
the close of the Revolutionary war was garrisoned, fortified, and the 
rendezvous for the fighters of the Valley. 

In the Colonial Documents in the State Library at Albany, are to 
be found little scraps of cheerful incidents that show the terrors of 
that situation where eternal vigilance was not only the price of liberty 
but of life. We quote some of them. 

In April, 1690, an attack was made on the feeble settlement at 
Canastagione where eight or ten people were killed by the French 
Indians, " which has made the whole country in an alarm and the 
people leave their plantations." 

Of this attack Leisler wrote to Governor Treat of Connecticut, 
April 19th, as follows : 

"It happened the last Sabbath day, at Niskayuna, 12 miles from 
Albany. The people there gathered all in one house and kept watch, 
the said French and Indians, finding in the night the house empty. 



66 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

and perceiving their retreat, were in a swamp, the people going in the 
morning, each to their houses, were surprised, nine Christians, two 
negroes were killed and captured, which must have encouraged the 
enemy to further attempt, if not prevented by a vigorous attack in 
Canada." 

About this time, the summer of 1691, the Indians took prisoner, 
'one Cornelis Clatie at Niskayuna. " At the end of June, two men 
went over the river at Niskayuna to make hay upon Claas (Janse 
Van Boekhoven's) DeBrabander's land, the most dangerous place in 
all the Province. Some French Indians surprised them, killed one 
and took off his skull. What became of the other we know not. 
The other people that were mowing the hay upon Claas DeBraban- 
der's Island, that now belongs to John Child, heard three guns go off 
and went to the river side, but saw^ no one. The canoes were there. 
We sent a party with horses who found one of the men lying in the 
water at the shore side. Such was the alarm that the people did not 
dare stay on their farms, and there was also danger of the crops not 
being harvested." 

In February came an alarm from Albany to Governor Fletcher 
that " 350 French and 200 Indians had come within 36 miles of 
Schenectady." 

In September, three French prisoners, being examined at New 
York, said that last summer (1692) the French of Canada "had a 
design to fall upon Albany and Schenectady and the Mohawk coun- 
try, but first to take Schenectady where they resolved to build a fort. 
Their design failed." 

The low condition of Schenectady is plainly shown by the follow- 
ing petition, so impoverished had the poor people become, that a pal- 
try tax of only ^^29 and 7 shillings was considered too great 
a burden for the whole township to bear. 

"To his Excellency, etc., etc. 

The humble petition of the inhabitants of Schenectady in the 
county of Albany, 

Humbly Showeth : 

That your Excellency's petitioners have received many great dam- 
ages and losses by the French and their adherents, by murdering of 



A PETITION FOR RELIEF. 67 

their Majesty's good subjects and burning their habitations and 
cattle, etc., and daily great charges and trouble with the Indian soldiers 
and their wives and children, as lately about 300 of these were here 
twenty-one days before they marched toward Canada, destroying our 
grain, etc., in our plantations, that our winter maintenance for our 
poor families is much shortened to our ruin having many poor 
widows and children from the out places here to secure their lives ; 
as also the magistrates, etc., of Albany have allotted to us to pay 
towards the tax of /'315 for our part ^29 and 7 shillings which 
seems to our poor condition very hard, not knowing how to raise it, 
being constrained to plant together that we cannot (lose) that little 
what we have left, etc. 

Whereupon your petitioners humbly implore your Excellency for a 
redress, and that we may be freed of all taxes till the war is ended 
and your excellency, further assistance with soldiers, etc., for a 
defense against the enemies, etc. (No signature). 

Petition granted '-'' nemine contradicente''^ 11 October, 1692." 

In July the French attacked and burnt the castle of the Oneidas ; 
the Onondagas finding themselves too weak to cope with them, 
burnt their castles and retreated. There was a great alarm at Sche- 
nectady lest the French should move down and attack the village. 

September 17th, 1696. "About ten days ago a skulking party of 
French Indians killed a man and wounded another near Schenec- 
tady." 

England with all her power and resources, four times outnumber- 
ing with the Five Nations, her noble allies, all her French and 
Indian enemies shamefully neglected the protection of the brave 
Hollander whose hope and courage never failed him after the first 
shock of his awful disaster was over. She would not fortify. Report 
after report was made of the shabby defenses at Albany and Schen- 
ectady. Imperative orders came again to Schenectady commanding 
the suffering, poverty-stricken people to build forts and stockades. 
Ryer Schermerhorn, a sturdy, brave and independent Dutchman as 
ever lived, rebelled and suffered. 

The century closed in gloom. A pall was over the poor little town. 
But in the two centuries to come she was to attract the attention of 



68 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

history with the continuous story of heroism, in the hour of danger 
to awaken the admiration of Christendom with her sturdy courage, 
to be unequalled in her devotion to the King of England, to be 
patient and long-suffering under wrong and neglect, to be in the day 
of the Revolution the most loyal little town in the State, to awaken 
amusement when as though tired out she went to sleep for years, to 
rouse astonishment when in this day she is advancing in population 
and business prosperity far beyond any city in the State, outstripped 
in rapid growth by comparatively few on the continent. 



CHAPTER IV. 



Schenectady in Border and the Oed French Wars — 1700 
TO THE Revolution. 

The morning of the eighteenth century woke very dark and 
lowering over the unhappy town. The Englishman had not exhib- 
ited the prescience or exercised the wise judgment of the cautious 
Hollander in his dealings with Schenectady's Indian neighbors. The 
Jesuit had been getting in his fine work on the imaginative credu- 
ality of the ungentle savage. The Mohawk was not proof against 
his blandishments. The trinkets of this earth were dangled before 
his eyes, the devil's own rum was freely traded to him by the French- 
men, and the priest with rosary, cross and his fascinating ceremonial 
began to wean away the great Five Nations, and the poor town 
could no longer rely with such perfect faith on her dusky and faith- 
ful allies. As an enemy the Indian is treacherous, and all around 
the borders of the City of Niskayuna and the bouwlands and Woes- 
tina (the wilderness) as West Rotterdam was called, assassinations 
were very frequent at the very gates of the city. " So bold had the 
enemy become," writes Col. Glen, " that French and Indians cap- 
tured an Onondaga Chief at the north gate. Twice the number of 
the attacking party went after them and drove^ them away. The 



ROSTER OF MILITARY. 



69 



Mohawks were neglected by the English. The French Jesuit was a 
new and a willing martyr to the faith of his adoration. Schenectady 
aroused, clamored for aid, and in 17 15 had two military companies 
on foot consisting of about sixty men, including officers. We give 
here the list of the names of the men of the two companies : 



Capt. J. Sanderse Glen, 
Lieut. Gerret Symer Feeder, 

(Veeder). 
Lieut. Jan Wemp, 
Lieut. Arent Brat, 
Lieut. Barent Wemp, 
Corp. Evert V. Eps, 
Corp. Theunis V. deVolge, 
Corp. Manus Vedder, 
Abraham Glen, 
Pieter Vrooman, Jr., 
Gysbert V. Brakel, 
Helmus Veeder, 
Joseph Teller, Jr., 
Jacob Swits, 
Sander Glen, 
Cornells Van Dyck, 
Claes Franse, (V. D. Bogart) 
Jacob Schermerhorn, 
Hendrick Vrooman, Jr., 
Jan Schermerhorn, 
Symon Toll, 
Jan Dellemont, 
Andries V. Pette, 
Jan Marselus, 
Jacob V. Olinda, 
Joseph Vedder, 
Cornells V. Slyck, 
Cornells Viele, 
David Marenus, 



Jocobus Peck, Jr., 
Abraham D. Graef, 
Peiter Danyelse, 

(V. Antwerpen). 
Phillip Philipse, 
Symon Folkertse Feeder, 

(Veeder). 
Jacob Vrooman, 
Pieter Quinzey. 
Jelles Van Vorst, 
Abraham Groot, 
Cornells Slingerlant, 
Eheunis Swart, 
Dirck Groot, 
Sweer Marselus, 
Jan Baptist V. Eps, 
Arent Danyelse, 

(V. Antwerpen). 
Barent Vrooman, 
Myndert Wimp. 
Jacob Teller, 
Willen Marenus, 
Class V. Putte, Jr., 
Jacob Flipse, (Philipse). 
Welm Had, (Hall). 
Robert Etts, (Yates). 
Nicolas Stensel, 
Arent Samuel Brat, 
Symon Groot, 
Marte V. Slyck, 



7° 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



John Peck, 
Jellis Fonda, 
Capt. Harme V. Slyck, 
Lieut. Hendrick Vrooman, 
Lieut. Jacob Glen, 
Sergeant Joseph Teller, 
Sergeant Gerret V. Brakel, 
Sergeant Folcket Symonse, 

(Veeder). 
Corp. Jacob V. Ghyselinge, 
Corp. Andreas de Graaf, 
Corp. Harme Veeder. 
Jan Barentse Wemp, 
Jan Vrooman, Jr., 
Cornelns Van der Volge, 
Benyemen V. Vleck, 
Marte V. Benthuysen, 
Samuel Hagadorn, 
William Teller, 
Wouter Vrooman, 
Jan Danyelse, 

(V. Antwerpen), 
Esyas Swart, 
Joseph Clement, 
Arent Schermerhorn, 
Jacob Meebie, 
Myndert Van Ghyselinge, 
Joseph Marenus, 
Victor Putman, 
Daniel Toll, 
Bartholomew Picker, Jr., 



Hendrick Flipse, (Philipse) 

Wilm Daes, 

Synion Swits, 

Arenout deGraef, 

Wilm Brouwer, 

Pieter Mebie, 

Tyerck Franse, 

(V. D. Bogart.) 
Philip Groot. 
Isaac de Graaf, 
Philip Bosie, 
Johannes Vrooman, 
Abraham Meebie, 
Harme Vedder, Jr., 
Jonetan Stevens, 
Arent Van Putte, 
Jacobus Vedder, 
Wouter Swart, 
Jeremy Tickstoon, 
Sander Flipse, (Philipse). 
William Coppernol, 
Hendrick Hagedorn, 
Peter Vrooman, 
Harme Flipse, (Philipse.) 
Robert Dwyer, 
Nicklas Stevens, 
Peter Bouwer, 
Peter Clement, 
Adam Smith, 
John Feerly, 
Joseph Van Eps. 



It will be observed that many new Dutch names appear. But two 
English names appear in the whole list, Robert Ets, that being the 
nearest that Robert Yates, who came here in 1711 with his father, 
Abram Yates, could spell his name in Dutch, and John Smith. The 



NEGLECT OF GOVERNMENT. 71 

Vanderbogarts, who have figured in every war, border, French and 
Indian and the Revohition, were called in old documents 
" Franse," and there has always been a Franse Van De Bogart in 
this city, until a quarter of a century ago. Van Antwerp was called 
Danielse and Dan Van Antwerp has been here in name at least for 
two hundred years. The descendants of these families are living 
among us to-day. 

For the entire first half of the century Schenectady furnished sol- 
diers to the Englishmen's war. The French were far inferior in 
numbers, by far the weaker nation, but they were untiring, vigilant 
and cruel. Their raids were frequently undertaken and carried out 
with an energy, fearlessness and rapidity that struck terror through- 
out our valley. With indignant surprise we look back on the story 
of that day, at the strange lethargy of England, and the wonderful 
alertness of her enemy, and that, with less than one-twelfth of her 
power in men, munitions and money, her enemy could strike blows 
in every quarter that evinced inexcusable neglect on the part of her 
powerful foe. All this captivated the savage, bred in him a profound 
and terror stricken respect for his smart and agile enemy, that often 
converted him to an ally of the winner in this bloody brigandage. 
The burgher, brave and sturdy as he was, was unnerved by the neg- 
lect of his government, and the dangers that hovered around him by 
night and day in field and by fireside. If he had been caught nap- 
ping one awful night in the close of the seventeenth, he was wide 
awake in the eighteenth century. It was his turn now to call on his 
comatose protectors to guard their frontier, and to call attention to 
defenceless towns, decaying forts and rotten barricades. Some idea 
of his life in the midst of enemies, firing on him from ambuscades 
by day, and hanging around his premises with gun and tomahawks 
by night, can be gathered from items picked up at random from the 
Colonial manuscript at Albany. 

No family was safe unless protected by blockhouse or palisade ; no 
man was exempt from military duty save by age or infirmity. In 
Schenectady and Albany each able-bodied man kept watch and ward 
every third or fourth night. French and English reports alike, give 
sad accounts of shocking barbarities practiced on both sides, by 



72 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

skulking parties of savages and white men. The following exam- 
ples, among many others taken from French reports, clearly show 
the cruelties practiced by these two Christian nations, who rewarded 
their savage allies in proportion to the number of scalps returned. 

"April 20th, 1746, a party of fourteen Iroquois belonging to the 
Sault St. Louis, commanded by Ontassago, the son of the grand 
chief of that village who sojourned at Fort St. Frederic (Crown 
Point) made several scouts to Sarasteau (Saratoga)." 

"May 24th, 1746, a party of eight Abenakis of Missiskony has 
been fitted out, who have been in the direction of Corlard (Schenec- 
tady) and have returned with some prisoners and scalps." It was 
probably in this raid that John Gfoot of Schenectady was captured. 
He died in Quebec Nov. 20th, 1746. 

"May 27th, 1746. An equipped party of eight Iroquois of Sault 
St. Louis, struck a blow near Orange, and brought back six scalps." 

" A party of Abenekis of Missiskony struck a blow near Orange, 
(x\lbany) and Corlard, (Schenectady) and brought some prisoners and 
scalps." 

"June 2, 1746, an equipped party of twenty-five warriors of the 
Sault, and three Flatheads who joined the former in an expedition 
to the neighborhood of Orange, and who returned with some scalps." 

"June 3, 1746, equipped a party of eighteen Nepissings who 
struck a blow at Orange and Corland (Schenectady)." 

" June 19th, 1746, equipped a party of twenty-five Indians of Sault 
St. Louis, who struck a blow near Orange (iVlbany). One or two 
of the Indians were wounded. They brought away some scalps." 

"June 20th, 1746, equipped a party of nineteen Iroquois of the 
Sault St Louis, who went to Orange to strike a blow." 

" March, 1747, there came into prison at Quebec a Dutchman from 
Schenectady and a woman from Saratoga." 

"In the spring of 1746, Edward Cloutman and Robert Dunbar, 
(son perhaps of John Dunbar of Schenectady, if so he was born in 
Albany Nov. 20th, 1709), broke prison at Quebec 23d of October, 
1746, and escaped. Dunbar was taken not long before, as he was 
scouting on the ' Carrying Place,' and his loss was greatly lamented 



INDIAN ATROCITIES. 73 

as he had performed the most important service as a ranger, ever 
since the war commenced." 

"May 7th, 1746. The inhabitants along the Mohawk river have 
left their settlements so that we are now reduced to great distress. 
As we wrote in our last, if a very considerable force be not immedi- 
ately sent to have neither men, money nor warlike stores." 

" P. S. Just now is news come that a house and barn are burnt 
at Canastagione (Niskayuna), and four men carried off or killed." 

About the same time, Simon Groot and two of his brothers were 
butchered, three miles from the village of Schenectady. The enemy 
burnt their buildings, killed their cattle and destroyed their other 
effects. They were discovered while doing this mischief by the set- 
tlers on the opposite side of the river, who knew some of the 
Indians, particularly Tom Wileman, who had lately removed from 
the Mohawk country to Albany. 

It was doubtless to this raid that Smith refers in his history of 
New York. He says : 

" One hundred and six men were detached from Schenectady. 
The track of the Indians was discovered by the fires they had made, 
and they were pursued above Schenectady. At the house of one 
Simon Groot they had murdered and scalped a boy, taken one man 
prisoner, plundered and set fire to the house, and shot a man in 
attempting to escape by swimming over the river." 

It was a school of terrible experience ; its history written in 
bloody text on every mile of land around and beneath us. It had 
its grand results as many of the awful lessons of carnage have. A 
race of fighting men was reared here, whose splendid courage was 
the inspiration of their children and their children's children in 
heroic defense of their King, and the independence of these United 
States in the days of still sterner battles that were rapidly drawing 
near. 

New England through the genius of historian and poet has drawn 
upon herself the attention of scholars and readers all over the world. 
The story of Pilgrim and Puritan, and a grand story it is, fills the 
school-book, and challenges the attention of the student of history 
the world over. But no valley in America has been made redder 



74 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

with the blood of heroic men than this. No hills have looked down 
on more scenes of horror and heroism than the Heilderbergs. No 
river in all this broad land flows through a valley richer in the 
record of patriot and martyr, to Catholic and Protestant faith, of 
loyalty to King George and George Washington, than the grand old 
Mohawk around us. 

Despite of wars and rumors of wars, of strife and bloodshed, all 
of which was engendered in Europe over the quarrels of monarchs 
that interested the burgher not one iota, while it made him fight all 
the time, the town grew and trade was always good. The land in 
the flats was unequalled in production of the staples of life. It was 
the best corn land then known on earth. Grain was plenty and to 
be obtained for trinkets and rum, both always plenty in the hands of 
the white man. 

A new fort was built. After the second fort had been occupied 
about fifteen years, 1690 to 1705, the block houses were abandoned 
(as barracks only) and Queen's " new fort " was built at the east 
angle of the stockade. This was the " Old Fort," about which all 
the traditions of the people cluster. It was at first simply a double 
or triple stockade, 100 feet square, with bastions or block houses at 
the angles. In 1735 it was rebuilt in a more substantial manner 
with timbers on a stone foundation. The four curtains were about' 
seventy-six feet each and the four bastions or blockhouses twenty- 
four feet square. 

In 1754, at the beginning of the French war, it contained one six 
and one nine pounder on carriages, but no "port holes in the cur- 
tains to fire them." 

From the recollections of a Sexagenary, in the State library, we 
gain further description as the Fort was seen in 1757. 

" Schenectady or Corlar, situated on the left bank of the Mohawk 
river, is a village of about 300 houses. It is surrounded by upright 
pickets flanked from distance to distance. Entering this village by 
the gate on the Fort Hunter side, there is a fort to the right which 
forms a species of citadel in the interior of the village itself. It is 
square, flanked with four bastions or demi-bastions, and is con- 
structed half of masonry and half of timbers piled over the other 



A SECOND PETITION. 75 

above the masonry. It is capable of holding 200 or 300 men. 
There are some pieces of cannon as a battery on the rampart. It is 
not encircled by a ditch. The entrance is through a large swing 
gate, raised like a drawbridge. By penetrating the village in attack- 
ing it at another point, the fire from the fort can be avoided." 

" After the Earl of Loudon had resigned to Gen. Abercrombie, 
the command of the army, which had reduced Oswego, my father, 
then a young man, was called to Schenectady by sudden business." 

" That place was then fortified. It had the shape of a parallelo- 
gram, with two gates, one opening to the eastern, the other to the 
northern road and was garrisoned by fifty or sixty soldiers." 

On the 15th of October following, the inhabitants of Schenectady 
again petitioned the Governor to build a fort in the village, signed 
by Daniel Campbell, Arent Bratt, Abraham Glen and others. 

The open space on which this fort stood, at the junction of Ferry, 
Front and Green streets, was about 264 feet more than 200 feet, 
extending from the Episcopal church yard to Green street. 

The fort was built nearly in the center of this plat, the south wall 
extending across Ferry street, three feet south of the north corner of 
the parsonage house. 

The well of the fort was in the middle of the street, three feet 
south of the north corner of Mr. James Sander's house. 

Mr. Nicholas Veeder, who died in Glenville in 1862, aged 100 
years, said that this fort was about twenty feet high and built of 
hewn timber, that it was taken down in the Revolutionary War, and 
the timber used in the frame of soldiers' barracks built on land of 
Johannes Quackenbos, at the south corner of Union and Lafayette 
streets. The village then had an armament of iron cannons and 
swivels, the largest of which were the "Lady Washington" and the 
" Long Nine Pounder," which were placed in the streets so as to 
command the gates. In digging trenches for water pipes in 1871, 
the south wall and well of the fort were discovered. 

The new fort called Queen's Fort, after Anne, their Queen of Eng- 
land, was garrisoned at the time of its building in 1704. 

The palisades on the west side of the village stood about 100 feet 
back from Washington street, but on the 29th of July, 1704, Gover- 



76 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

nor Cornbury issued the following order for removing them to the 
bank of the Benne Kil : 

" You or either of you are hereby required as early as the weather 
will permit, that next spring to cause the stockades set upon the 
west side of the town of Schenectady, to be removed from the place 
where they now stand, and be set up as near the river as the ground 
will permit, and hereof you are not to fail. 

Given under my hand at Schenectady this 29th day of July, 1704. 
To Johannes Sanders (Glen), 
Adam Vrooman." 

To understand the significance of this order, it should be remem- 
bered that since the destruction of the first fort in 1690, the ground 
lying west of Washington street had been outside of the west of the 
second fort. By the year 1704, the " Queen's New Fort" had been 
erected in the east corner of the village, at the junction of Front, 
Ferry and Green streets, the Governor therefore orders the removal 
of the west line of the second fort by setting back the stockades to 
the bank of the Benne Kil, the land along Washington street revert- 
ing to the original owners. 

This wall seems to have been removed to include houses, built 
beyond it towards the Benne Kil, which had rendered it useless as 
a defense, while it cut them off from access to the street. The square 
of four blocks was left intact by the Queen's Fort, it having been 
built beyond the old palisades in the triangle bounded by the pali- 
sades on the south, near Ferry street on the east, and the river road 
(now State street), on the north side. The original wall went 
straight from the corner of Front and Washington to the door of St. 
George's church. There was a gate at Church street most of the 
time. From this gate ran the river road. The placing of the fort 
of 1704 threw the road beyond the north bastion of the fort and 
Green street, and when laid out conformed to it also. After the 
abandonment of the old fort the triangle of land was converted into 
house lots. 

The garrison was as follows : From Half Moon, eastern Niska- 
yuna and what is now the town of Crescent Park. Schenectady and 
Niskayuna furnished each twenty men. John Sanders Glen reported 



FORTS REPAIRED. 77 

in the fall of 171 1, that the fort was in a rotten condition, and in 
obedience to orders he proceeded to repair it. 

After the peace of Utrecht, between Great Britain and France, 
in 1713, until the " Old French War," in 1744, the people on the 
borders enjoyed reasonable quiet and safety. 

There were efforts made from time to time, however, to keep up a 
show of defense by rebuilding the wooden forts and posting^small 
garrisons therein. 

Thus in 1715, and again in 1719, the Assembly passed acts for 
repairing the forts here. 



CHAPTER V. 

The City in the Eighteenth Century. 

The city was a lovely place as tradition hands it down to us. 
Ungridironed by railroad or canal, poles or wires, the necessary but 
unsightly adjuncts of an unromantic, unsentimental age, an age that 
tears down and builds up at its pleasure, disembowels the ancient 
graveyard on Green street, razes to the earth the old landmarks, 
that old eyes loved to see, and that grew dim as they were taken 
away. The little village nestled under magnificent elms, parasols in 
the summer and stockades against the storms of winter. Names of 
streets were changed. Albany street became Martyrlaer, the street' 
of the martyrs. What is now Washington avenue became Hande- 
laer, the street of traders. Niskayuna (Union) long retained its 
name. Front street still holds its own name. Commonplace and 
cheap nomenclature, that we share with all the municipal mush- 
rooms of earth, have taken the places of the titles that were melodi- 
ous and suggestive, memorials to the heroic dead, and the founders 
of a trade and traffic that grew steadily, and with a solid and conservative 
progress, until interrupted and overthrown for a time by the advent 
of canal and railroad. 



78 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The architecture was all Netherland gothic when built of brick. 
Frame houses were many of them built in as nearly the same style 
as the material would permit. But a very common style of wooden 
structure, especially of the larger kind, was a kind of edifice seen 
only in Schenectady, Kingston and old Dutch burghs. The whole 
upper half or second story front was a semi-circle. The last one was 
taken ^own more than forty years ago to make way for the residence 
now occupied by Mr. Hinsdell Parsons. Rare, quaint old houses, 
they were. One of the finest specimens of the style was the ware- 
house of DeGraff, Walton & Co., on the river bank where Whit- 
myer's broom factory now is. The smaller style of the brick build- 
ing may be seen in the residence of Mrs. Joseph Y. Van Vanderbo- 
gart, opposite the Court House, on Union street, built by Abraham 
Yates in 1734. 

The business was all grouped on Handalaer, the lower part of 
Martyrlaer and the foot of West Front street. The Mohawk began 
early to be the avenue of transportation and travel to the westward. 
And on what is known as the " Camp," the plain directly west of 
the Sanders house, gathered under Sir William Johnson, companies 
of troops under the commands of Major Roseboom, Capt. Christo- 
pher Yates and Bradt for the expedition against Fort Niagara. 
Warehouses began to be erected along the Benne Kil, as the Frog 
Alley river was then called, and stores, little and big, began to thicken 
along Front and Handalaer streets, the markets of the retailers. 

Others came to the growing town in the early days of 1700, who 
became the founders of large families, and in the French war and 
the Revolution were destined to win renown. 

In a future chapter on genealogies there will be abundant records 
for hundreds of the descendants of the old stock to furnish proof 
sufficient to enable them to gain entrance into any of the ancestral 
societies that are so popular in these days. We are growing old 
enough to have a purely American ancestry, of an origin better, 
purer and as brave as any European country can produce. It is 
intended that one of the advantages of this volume will be to give 
people an opportunity, if they so desire, to prove a birth and lineage 
purer than any traced from issue of some of the multi-married John 



ANOTHER MASSACRE. 79 

of Gaunts, or, from the hazy ladies of the time of Charles II., the 
morganatic marriages of the French nobility, or the titled Cyprians 
of the days of the Georges, the four Royal Brutes, as Thackery calls 
them. 

The Marcellus, a Spanish Holland name contracted into Marselis, 
the Mynderse, Phillepse's (Phillips), the Swarts, the Antwerps who 
built the Maybe house near Fitchburgh Junction, the Vanderbogarts 
written almost always Franse, the Van Eps, the Van Valkenberghs, 
Van Voasts and the Veeders and Yates, most all are on Revolutionary 
rolls. 



CHAPTER VI. 
The Beukendaal Massacre. 



Meanwhile another horror was coming down on the unhappy 
county with the central years of the century, not in the city, but 
near enough in distance and far nearer in the awful shadow on many 
a happy home, within the gates and palisades. 

The " Sacandaga Pike " turns off from the village of Scotia at its 
junction with what is still called Reeseville. It is the second road 
north, or to the right after entering the village at the residence of 
Mr. James Collins. A few rods beyond where this road passes over 
the New York Central, just at the foot of the long ascent to the 
Town House, and directly opposite to the Toll mansion, one will see 
at the right, a little glen, a very modest one now, but of deeper 
depression and heavily timbered on its banks and glades in 1748. 
This is the Beukendaal, corrupted by the Dutch into Poopendal. 
Here was the scene of one of those skulking massacres, those shud- 
der bearing tales of horror, that made life in those days an hourly 
tremor all through the land. The Mohawk farmer had become alert 
and vigilant. In the heart of a game-producing county he had 
learned to be a deadly marksman. In the protection of his own life 
and the guardianship of those he loved, he had gained a splendid 



8o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

nerve that aimed at the heart of a crouching enemy with the cool- 
ness with which he could shoot a polecat. But more than once he 
fell a victim to that murderous craft that the bloodthirsty genius of 
his Indian foe was perpetually planning. 

As the war drew to a close in 1748, Schenectady met with the 
severest loss it had suffered at any one time since the year 1690. This is 
generally called the Poopendal (a corruption of Beukendaal) 
massacre. It was however, in no sense a massacre like that of 1690, 
except perhaps, in the killing of the first victim, but a stand-up hand 
to hand fight in Indian fashion, in which the whites were the attack- 
ing party, and on that account suffered more severely than the sav- 
ages. 

About twenty of the former were killed and some thirteen or more 
made prisoners ; of the losses of the latter we have no sufficient 
accounts. 

Beyond tradition the accounts of this skirmish are meagre and 
uncircumstantial . 

A brief letter to Col. William Johnson, written by Albert Van 
Slyck July 21st, 1748, three days after the affair, is the only semi- 
official narrative w^e have, and was given by one who was in the 
fight. 

From the details preserved in this letter, it appears that a party of 
men from Schenectady, the leader of whom w^as Daniel Toll, had 
been dispatched to some place in the vicinity, to bring in a number 
of horses. They were surprised by a party of the enemy, whose 
presence in the neighborhood was neither known nor suspected. 

" The firing was heard by Adrian Van Slyck, a brother of the 
writer of the account, who seems to have resided at a distance from 
the town. He sent a negro to the latter place to give the alarm and 
obtain reinforcements. Four parties of armed men successively 
repaired to the scene of action, the first of which was composed of 
the " New England lieutenant with some of his men and five or six 
young lads," accompanied by Daniel Van Slyck, another brother. 
The second party was led by Ackes Van Slyck ' and some men,' 
how many of either party is not stated. 

" Adrian Van Slyck followed next, at the head of a party of New 



ACCOUNT OF MASSACRE. ' 8i 

York levies, but on reaching the scene of action, where Ackes with 
inferior numbers was holding the enemy at bay, the levies all fled in 
a most cowardly manner. 

" The fourth party was composed of Albert Van Slyck (the writer 
of the letter), Jacob Glen and several others, on the approach of 
whom the enemy drew off leaving Adrian among the dead." 

The letter adds : "It grieves me, I not being a commander, that 
when we went. Garret Van Antwerp would suffer no more to accom- 
pany the party." 

The second account, written by Giles F. Yates, Esq., and pub- 
lished in the Schenectady De^nocrat and Reflector^ April 22, 1836, 
was gathered from tradition, then floating about among the aged peo- 
ple of that day, with whom Mr, Yates had an extended acquaintance. 

"In the beginning of the month of July, 1748, Mr. Daniel (Toll) 
and his favorite servant Ryckert, went in search of some stray horses 
at Beukendahl, a locality about three miles from this city. They 
soon heard, as they supposed, the tramping of horses ; but on nearer 
approach the sound they mistook for that made by horses hoofs on 
the clayey ground, proceeded from the quoits with which some 
Indians were playing. 

" Mr. Toll discovered his danger too late, and fell pierced by the 
bullets of the French savages, for such they were. Ryckert, more 
fortunate, took to his heels and fled. He reached Schenectady in 
safety and told the dreadful news of the death of his master and the 
presence of the enemy. 

" In less than an hour about sixty volunteers were on the march 
to Beukendahl, The greater part of these were young men and 
such was their zeal that they would not wait until the proper author- 
ities had called out the militia. Without discipline or experience, 
and even without a leader, they hastened to the Indian camp, 

" Those in advance of the main body, before they reached the 
enemy, were attracted by a singular sight. They saw a man resem- 
bling Mr, Toll sitting near a fence in an adjoining field, and a crow 
flying up and down before him. 

" On coming nearer they discovered it to be the corpse of Mr. 
Toll with a crow attached to it by a string. 



82 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

" This proved to be a stratagem of the Indians to decoy their 
adversaries. The Schenectadians fell, alas, too easily into the snare 
laid for them, and were in a few moments surrounded by the Indians 
who had been lying in ambush. Thus taken by surprise, they lost 
many of their number, and some were taken prisoners before they 
could make good their retreat. 

" They, however, succeeded in reaching the house of Mr. DeGrafE 
in the neighborhood, which had been for some time deserted. But 
while retreating they continued to fire upon their enemy. On reach- 
ing Mr. DeGraff's house they entered, bolted the doors, and ascended 
to the second floor. Here they tore off all the boards near the eaves, 
and through the opening thus made, fired with success at the sav- 
ages and succeeded in keeping them at bay. In the meantime Dirck 
Van Vorst, who had been left in the charge of two young Indians, 
effected his escape. 

" The two youngsters were anxious to see the fight and secured 
their prisoner by tieing him to a tree and left him alone. He suc- 
ceeded in getting his knife from his pocket and cutting the cord 
with which he was bound. On the approach of the Schenectady 
militia under Col. Jacob Glen the party in Mr. DeGraff's house were 
relieved from their perilous situation, and the enemy took up their 
line of march from Canada. 

" On this occasion there were thirty-two citizens killed. Of these 
we are able to give the names of Jacob Glen, (cousin of Col. Glen), 
Peter Vrooman, John Darling, Adam Conde, Van Antwerpen, Cor- 
nelius Viele, Nicholas DeGraff and Adrian Van Slyck ; wounded, 
Ryer Wemp, Robinson and Wilson ; prisoners, Abraham DeGraff 
and his son William, John Phelps, Harmen Veeder and Lewis 
Groot. 

" The bodies of DeGraff and Glen were found lying in a close con- 
tact with their savage antagonists, with whom they had wrestled in 
deadly strife. 

" The corpses were brought to Schenectady the evening of the 
massacre and deposited in the large barn of Abraham Mabee, in the 
rear of the building lately occupied by Mrs. Churchill on Washing- 
ton Avenue. The barn was removed only a few years ago. The 



KILLED BY SAVAGES. S3 

relatives of the deceased repaired thither to claim their departed 
kindred and remove them for interment." 

The third narrative may be found in Drake's " Particular His- 
tory," and seems to have been gleaned from various sources. It is 
particularly valuable as giving more names of the killed and missing 
than any other account. 

"July 1 8th, 1748. About three miles from Schenectady, Daniel 
Toll, Dirck Van Vorst and a negro went to a place called Poopendal 
to catch their horses ; but not finding the horses as they expected, 
they went into the adjacent woods to a place called the Clay pit 
(Kley Kuil). They discovered Indians and attempted to escape from 
them, but were pursued by them and Toll and Van Vorst were shot 
down, but the negro escaped. Van Vorst, though wounded, was not 
killed but taken prisoner. The firing was heard at Maalwyck about 
two miles distant and the people, knowing that Toll and Van Vorst 
had gone for their horses, suspected the occasion of the firing. This 
was about ten o'clock in the morning and a messenger was at 
once dispatched to the town where the alarm was sounded about 
twelve. Some . of the inhabitants with a company of new levies, 
posted there under Lieutenant Darling of Connecticut, in all seventy 
men, marched out toward Poopendal cautiously searching for the 
enemy. They went as far as the lands of Simon Groot, but made 
no discovery of the enemy. At this point the negro before men- 
tioned came to the party and told them where the body of his mas- 
ter was. 

The negro was furnished with a horse and they (about forty in 
number) were piloted to the spot where his master lay dead, near 
Beukendahl at Abraham DeGraaf's house. They immediately 
entered the woods with the negro where they at once discovered the 
enemy in great numbers, upon whom they discharged a volley with 
a shout. The enemy shouted in return, accompanying it with a vol- 
ley also. This was the commencement of a most desperate fight. 
All but two or three of the English stood to it manfully, although 
they were hemmed in on every side by the great numbers of the 
enemy, and fought over a space of about two acres ; yet the battle 
ground was left in possession of the settlers. In this hand to hand 



84 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

encounter twelve of the inhabitants of Schenectady were killed out- 
right, five were taken prisoners and seven of Lieut Darling's men, 
including himself, were killed and six of them missing, who were 
supposed to be taken prisoners. The news of this battle reached 
Albany on the evening of the same day, and by midnight Lieut. 
Chew, with one hundred English and two hundred friendly Indians, 
were on the march for the scene of action, but to no other purpose 
than to show their willingness to meet an emergency of this kind. 
The names of the people killed, so far as ascertained, were Daniel 
Toll, Frans Van der Bogart, Jr., Jacob Glen, Jr., Daniel Van Ant- 
werpen, J. P. Van Antwerpen, Cornelius Viele, Jr., Adrian Van 
Slyck, Peter Vrooman, Klaas A. DeGraaf, Adam Conde, John A. 
Bradt and John Marinus. 

" There were missing Isaac Truax, Ryer Wemp, Johannes Seyer 
Vrooman, Albert John Vedder and Frank Conner, all belonging to 
Schenectady. Of the soldiers, seven were killed and six missing." 

From these accounts it is certain that the presence of the Indians 
was not suspected until the first shot ; that Captain Daniel Toll was 
the first victim ; that the alarm was given by his negro Ryckert ; 
that a company of Connecticut levies under Lieut. Darling accompa- 
nied and followed by squads of the inhabitants marched to the scene; 
and that after a hot engagement the Indians retreated, leaving twenty 
of the whites dead, and taking away thirteen or fourteen prisoners 
besides the wounded. 

Considering the number of the whites engaged, their loss was very 
severe, amounting probably to one-third of their force. 

The following is the fullest list of killed and missing that can 
now be given : 

KILLED. 

John A. Bradt, Adrian Van Slyck, 

Johannes Marinus, Jacob Glen, Jr., 

Peter Vrooman, Adam Conde, 

Daniel Van Antwerpen, J. P. Van Antwerpen, 

Cornelius Viele, Jr., Frans Van der Bogart, 
Nicholas DeGraaf. 



THOSE WOUNDED AND MISSING. 85 

Capt. Daniel Toll was standing by a tree when the fatal bullet 
struck him. His name was to be seen cut in the bark for many 
years after but has now disappeared. 

WOUNDED. 

Ryer Wemp, Dirck Van Vorst, 

Robinson, Wilson, 

And probably many others. 

MISSING AND PRISONERS. 

John Phelps, Harman Veeder, 

Eewis Groot, Isaac Truax, 

Johannes Seyer Vrooman, Albert John Vedder, 

Frank Connor, 
And six soldiers, in all thirteen men. 

After the close of hostilities, Governor Clinton sent Lieut. Stod- 
dert to Montreal to arrange for an exchange of prisoners. With 
Capt. Anthony Van Schaick he went into the Indian country to 
recover the captives, but with indifferent success. Among those 
who were with Lieut. Stoddert, were Capt. Anthony Van Schaick, 
John Vrooman, Peter Vasborough (Vosburgh), Albert Vedder and 
Francis Connor. Efforts were made to induce others to return, but 
without success. Of these were Rachel Quackenbos, Simon Fort 
and Philip Phillipsen. Rachel Quackenbos abjured the English 
religion and Lieut. Stoddert could not persuade her to return. Fort 
and Phillipse also desired to remain with the Iroquois ; the former 
belonged by adoption to a sister of a chief named Agonareche. She 
refused to give him up at any price. Capt. Van Schaick offered 
six hundred livres for Fort but was not successful. On the contrary, 
so determined was his squaw owner to retain him that she said she 
would obey the French commandant and deliver him up, but that 
she and her husband would follow him, and he should not reach 
home alive. Lieut. Stoddert left Canada on the 28th of June, 1750, 
with twenty-four prisoners. 

7 



86 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



CHAPTER VII. 



Schenectady in Coloniae Wars. 

All through the eighteenth century the names of the Schenectady 
burghers are proportionately more numerous than any of the then 
military divisions of the Province. The Mohawker was born in the 
midst of war's alarms, baptized to the music of the twang of the 
bowstring and crack of musketry. Often and often the hands that 
sprinkled his forehead, or made the sign of the cross above it, had 
become familiar with the stain of blood, as priest or parson performed 
the last duty to the dying. Among the old names all the blood is 
soldier's blood. Beginning with the year 1 700 the roll of fighters is 
long and heroic. Some of the names are still well known and prom- 
inent, some have died out. It is surprising to know of so many 
whose ancestors, two centuries ago fought, and suffered, and died for 
God and King, whose record is among the easily attained archives of 
New York, and yet who know nothing about that recorded story of 
ancient valor that may well be the pride of their children's children. 

From as exhaustive an examination of Colonial Mss., as their 
immense volume will permit, we give here the companies and regi- 
ments from Schenectady, then part of Lyon and Albany county, who 
did duty in the protection of home and in the service of William 
and Mary, Anne and the three Georges of England. By examina- 
tion of the genealogical records that follow, it will be possible for 
thousands of her people to learn just the fighting stock from which 
they came. 

The first roll is that of a company of foot. The official record is 
John Sanders Glen, Captain, Adam Vrooman, Lieutenant and Harman 
Van Slyck, Ensign, in the years r7oo-i4. 



OTHER COMPANIES. 



87 



Two Companies at Schenectady. 

Johannes Sanders Glen, Capt., Gerrit Symonse, Lieut., 

Jacob Glen, Ensign. 
Jan Wemp, Capt., Arent Bradt, Lieut, 

Syman Switz, Ensign. 

One Company at Niskayuna. 
Johannes Wendell, Capt., Anthony Van Slyck, (minor) 



Jacob Vanderheyden, Ensign. 



Lieutenant. 



List of Capt. Sanders Glen. 



Capt. John Sanders Glen, 
Lieut. Jan Wemp, 
Corp. Everet Van Eps, 

Corp. 
Abraham Glen, 
Peter Vrooman, Jr., 
Gilbert Van Brackel, 
Helmus Veeder, 
John Teller, Jr., 
Jacob Switz, 
Sander Glen, 
Cornelus Van Dyck, 
Claas Vanderbogart, 
Jacob Schermerhorn, 
Jan Schermerhorn, 
Symon Toll, 
Jan Dilemont, 
Andris Van Patten, 
Jan Marselus, 
Jacob Van O'Linda, 
John Vedder, 
Sweer Marselus, 
Jan Paptist Van Eps, 
Arent Daniels, 



Lieut. Gerrit Symons, 
Sergt. Arent Bradt, 
Corp. Theunis Vander Volgen, 
Manus Vedder. 

Cornelus Van Slyck, 
Cornelus Viele, 
David Marenus, 
John Peck, 
Jellis Fonda, 
Jobin Peck, Jr., 
Abraham DeGraff, 
Peter Daniels, 
Phillip Phillipse, 
Symon Veeder, 
Jacob Vrooman, 
Peter Quinzy, 
Jellis Van Voarst, 
Abraham Groot, 
Cornelus Slingerlant, 
Thomas Swart, 
Dirck Groot, 
Robert Eps, 
Nicholas Henpel, 
Arent Samuel Bradt, 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Barent Vrooman, 
Hendrick Vrooman, Jr., 
Myndert Wemp, 
Jacob Teller, 
William Marenus, 
Jacob Phillips, 



Symon Groot, 
Marte Van Slyck, 
Hendrick Phillips, 
William Daes, 
Claas Van Patten, 
William Hall. 



(Signed) John Sanders Glen, 
Gerret Symon, 
Jan Wemp. 

List of Capt. Harman Van Slyck. 



Capt. Harman Van Slyck, 
Lient. Jacob Glen, 
Sergt. Gerrit Van Brackel, 
Corp. Jacob Van Guysling, 

Corp. Harman 
Jan Barentse Wemple, 
Jan Vrooman, Jr., 
Cornelns Vander Volgen, 
Benjamin Van Slyck, 
Marte Vanderheyden, 
Samuel Hagadorn, 
William Teller, 
Walter Vrooman, 
Jan Daniels, 
Esyas Swart, 
Joseph Clement, 
Arent Schermerhorn, 
Jacob Mebie, 
Myndert Van Guysling, 
John INIarenus, 
Victor Putman, 
Arent Van Patten, 
Jacob Vedder, 
Walter Swart, 



Lieut. Hendrick Vrooman, 
Sergt. John Teller, 
Sergt. Volbert Simons, 
Corp. Andris DeGraff, 
Vedder. 

Daniel Daniels, 

Daniel Toll, 

Bartholomew Pecker, Jr. 

John Van Eps, 

Symon Swits, 

Fremont DeGraff, 

William Brouwer, 

Peter Meebie, 

Tecares Van De Bogart, 

Phillip Groot, 

Isaac De Graff, 

Phillip Bo, 

Johannes Vrooman, 

Abraham Meebie, 

Harman Vedder, Jr., 

Jonethan Stevens, 

Robert Digger, 

Nicholas Stevens, 

Peter Brouwer, 



COMPANIES IN CITY. 



89 



Jermy, 

Sandor Phillips, 
William Coppernol, 
Hendrick Hagadorn, 
Harman Phillips. 



Peter Clement, 
Adam Smith, 
John Fairlee, 
Peter Vrooman, 



(Signed), Harman Van Slyck, 
Hendrick Vrooman, 
Jacob Glen. 
In 1 71 7. Two companies in existence in the city. 

Glen, Capt., Gerrit Symonse, Lient., and John Wemple, Ensign, 
of the one; Harman Van Slyck, Capt., Hendrick Vrooman, Lieut., 
Jacob Glen, Ensign of the other. Niskayuna furnished a company 
of foot. Jacob Van Schoonhoven was Capt., Hans Hansen, Ensign 
and John Wendell, Lieut. 

In 1733 there were three companies of infantry in Schenectady, 
officered as follows : 

The First Company. 
Wilhemus Veeder, Capt., Lieut. John A. Vedder, 



in the room of Jacob Glen. 
Lieut. Abraham Truax. 



Ensign, Jan Baptiste Van Eps, 



The Second Company. 



Capt. Abraham Glen, 
Lieut. Jan B. Wemple, 



Lieut. Andries A. Bradt, 
Ensign, Hendrick Wemple, 



The Third Company. 
Jacob Van Slyck, Capt., William Teller, Lieut., 



Myndert Mynderse, Lieut., 



John A. Bradt, Ensign. 



In the meanwhile Daniel Campbell in 1754 came here and settled 
in Rotterdam to enter the service of the king. Very soon after his 
coming, John Duncan came the year following, to not only serve 
under the king, but to remain in it all through the Revolution, and 
to take command of a company under Sir John Johnson and attack 
the settlement on the Mohawk River. 



90 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Joseph Yates had emigrated from Albany and had settled at the 
Aalplans where is now the property of Mr. Pierre Hoag, and must 
have prospered as he owned a large plantation, cultivated by slaves, 
which extended from the Aalplans Creek, along the north bank of 
the river to what is now Freeman's Bridge. He had two sons, 
Christopher (Stoeffle) and Jelis, the Dutch for Giles. These men 
were fort officers in the service of the king. The soldiers of that 
day were divided into militia, provincial troops and regulars. The 
militia did as much duty as either, in fact had seen more brave 
fighting in many instances than either of the others. They cer- 
tainly had in the Mohawk valley. The militiaman did not, as did 
his successors long years afterward, enlist for his personal beauty, 
his gaudy trappings, the pomp and circumstances of holiday parade, 
but to be ready at a moment's call to guard his and his neighbor's 
home. And in the early latter half of the century, the system of 
keeping the rolls and records was established which enabled us to 
find out just who were those who did soldierly duty for their king, 
as long as such duties were consistent with patriotism. 

One of the best known old soldiers of Colonial days was Jellis 
Fonda, father of the heroic Major Jellis of the Revolution. He 
was a lieutenant in Mathews Company in 1755. He was major 
under Sir William Johnson of the Third Regiment of Albany. He 
was the close companion, comrade and friend of Sir William John- 
son. 

Two of the most ferocious old fighters of Colonial days were Cap- 
tains Jonathan Stevens and William McGinnis, both killed beside 
King Hendrick and Col. Williams, founder of Williams College. 
They both commanded Schenectady companies. Sir William John- 
son reported officially that McGinnis, Stevens and the Schenectady 
men fought like lions. Stevens was killed at the age of twenty- 
eight, leaving no lineal descendants. 

Christopher Yates (known universally in the valley as Col. 
Stoeffle to distinguish him from Christopher P. and Peter Yates, his 
cousin, all of them becoming afterwards colonels in the Revolution), 
was commissioned as captain in the New York Provincial Regiment 
at Oswego, Thursday, June 15th, 1759. He was promoted while on 



DIARY OF LIEUTENANT YATES. 91 

his way to Fort Niagara in command of the rear guard, afterwards 
of the quarter guard of the army, under Gen. Prideaux, who on his 
death in the assault was succeeded by Sir William Johnson. Yates 
had under him a Schenectady company, the roll of which cannot be 
found. 

The French always maintained that Sir William Johnson took the 
fortress by deceit, treachery and the violation of the laws of civilized 
warfare. As interestingly illustrative of the means and ways of 
military transportation of those days, we offer extracts from Yates' 
diary of the journey. It will be seen that the Frenchman's charge 
against Sir William is abundantly substantiated by the written state- 
ment of an officer in the British service. 

Diary of Lieut. Christopher Yates, Afterwards Captain in 
THE Expedition against Fort Niagaria in July, 1759. 

" A diary of my proceedings from my father's house in Schenec- 
tady which I left on June ist, with the last party of our regiment, 
commanded by Col. Johnson, consisting of about 300 men with 
whale boats. 

"The first day we went to Claas Vieles. Each night I had the 
quarter guard. The next day we went to Sir Williams' (Sir William 
Johnson) and encamped there, and the next day we went to Little 
Falls and carried over some whale boats. On the same evening- 
came up the artillery batteaux, which went over the falls before us, 
putting our party in great confusion. The next day we were ordered 
to make fascines to mend the road, which was very bad, and were 
four days in getting over our boats and provisions. 

" From thence we proceeded to Fort Herkimer where we camped 
and from whence we proceeded to Orisco, which was June 14th, dur- 
ing which time we heard an alarm by the firing of more guns on the 
north side of the river, and sent out a party of about eighty or more 
men who made no discovery. The commanders of the party were 
Captain Bloomer, Lieutenant Schuyler and Lieutenant Wemple. 
Proceeded to Fort Stanwix. (Wemple was afterwards colonel in 
the Second New York in the Revolution). 



92 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

" When we came there, the 14th and i6th regiments were 
marched to Canada Creek, part of our regiment to Fort Bull. Next 
day we tarried at Fort Stanwix, then another part of our regiment 
went off commanded by Major Roseboom, (afterwards colonel), 
which was the 15th of June, and Sir William went off from the fort 
with a great party of Indians. It was a fine sight, the bands of 
music played upon the ramparts of the fort, when the General and 
Sir William went off with the Indians. 

" Oswego, July ist, 1759. Upon a Sunday morning our army 
commanded by General Prideaux, went off from Oswego to Niagara, 
and in that way until we came to a great covered harbor called 
Sodom, (Sodus), and encamped there that night, and the next morn- 
ing, July 2nd, went off from there. At night we came to another 
cove called Jerundequa. 

" July 4th. In the morning we set off and proceeded until about 
two or three in the afternoon, when we encamped by a mighty great 
one (cove) where the Geneva river comes out into the lake. 

" J^^ly 5th. In the morning we went from there and proceeded 
along until we came to a narrow cove and creek, and there we 
encamped, and in the morning very early; about three or four o'clock, 
we set off and proceeded very smartly until we came to a cove about 
three miles, and there we landed. The same afternoon the Indians 
went and about three o'clock in the morning cannonaded and took 
three prisoners and six whale boats almost from under the fort and the 
general. The whale boats went in order to catch the sloops but the 
sloops laid under the fort so that they could not catch them. The 
fort shot several cannons at the boats, shot one man, taking his leg 
right off. 

" The next day, which was the 7th, we prepared our cannons and 
the sloop played every hour on the lake, firing several cannons, and 
so they did all next day, which was the 8th. Then we marched 
about a mile from the fort and made gabions, etc., all that day. 
Next day went in a flag of truce, which was Monday the 8th. Then 
we began to intrench, and I was in the entrenches all that night 
until morning, and then they fired very smart all three cannons but 
did not do any damage. Then Wednesday, the nth there went a 



DIARY CONTINUED. 



93 



flag of tnice from the Indians, and stayed in the fort a good while, 
and there was no further firing from them or from us. Before then 
we entrenched like men, and as soon as the Indians came 
there was no work all that night, but we did not mind that much, 
we worked the attack like smoke. They wounded a few men very 
slightly with their small arms. That night we began to play with 
four or five howitzers. In the morning we brought a few cannons 
into the trench. The 1 2th at night, I went in and they said they 
saw hot work there, there was one of our men killed and Indian 
Williams wounded very badly. Then at night we entrenched 
until within 200 yards of the fort, close by their gabions. Satur- 
day 13th we began the batteries but did not finish them. 

"Sunday the 14th. Went and was in all night, but it rained so 
hard that we could not work ; that night we finished three batteries. 

"The 17th. In the morning the firing was pretty hot, all that 
day and the next day, the i8th at night, we entrenched. 

" The 1 8th. In the afternoon the schooner came from Garoqua. 
The same night we entrenched forty yards from their breastwork, 
but the schooner did not come to the fort. 

" The 20th. In the afternoon our colonel was wounded through 
his leg by a musket shot, and Colonel Johnson was killed by a mus- 
ket ball as he was laying out the ground to entrench. That night 
at about ten o'clock the General (Prideaux) was killed by one of our 
cowhorn (mortars) and Sir William Johnson took command. And 
so we marched and worked night and day, until the 24th, when we 
were attacked by about 1500 of the enemy, under the command of 
Mushur Delanquay about ten o'clock in the morning. But we soon 
gave them their breakfast, and on the 25th we took the fort." 

The Captain's spelling is very phonetic, his pronunciation of 
French amusing, but as we hear of him in the future he will loom 
up in the revolution, and after, as an accomplished and cultivated 
gentleman. He was but twenty-two years of age and yet had fought 
and been wounded at Ticonderoga. (Col. Records Vol. 10, p. 731, 
N. Y. State lyibrary). Yates obtained prominence from the fact that 
he took a company from Schenectady to Fort Niagara, but there 



94 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

were others of the provincial troops, whose descendants are all 
around us. 

Captain Cornelius Van Dyke commanded a company in 1762, mus- 
tered at Schenectady. But two Schenectady names appear on the 
roll of Privates, Peter Prunus and John Dance. Van Dyck was 
afterwards one of the most heroic of the Revolution. As colonel of 
the First Regiment of the line he participated in Monmouth, York- 
town and almost every battle. His descendants are numerous. Van 
Dyck was present at the surrender of Colonel Wallace. 

Daniel Campbell, Andrew Truax, John Vrooman and Gerrit 
Lansing were commissioned captains in 1762. 

On the roll of Captain Campbell's company appear only the fol- 
lowing Schenectady names : Philip Truax, Arent Wemple, Parent 
Wemple, Isaac Jacob Switz, Daniel DeGraff, Isaac I. Swits, Thomas 
Little, Simon Samuel, John and Joseph Brougham, Dirck and Phillip 
Van Patten and Robert Shannon, William, James and Matthew 
Thorton. 

Captain Garrit A. Lansing's company was composed of Schenec- 
tady men. The names are spelled with perfect devotion to Dutch 
pronunciation, biit in absolute contempt of correctness, yet the 
reader will readily distinguish the familiar titles. 

Capt. Gerrit A. 'LansinCx's Company. 

A list of the ofhcers and men in the Second Schenectady company 
of militia, with the dates of officers' commissions, 1767 : 

Capt. Gerrit A. Lansing, 2d day of November, 1754. 
First Lieut. John S. Glen, 23d day of October, 1758. 
Second Lieut. Abraham Wemple, 23d day of October, 1759, 

afterwards Colonel of Second N. Y. 
Ensign Samuel Van Slyck, 23d day of October, 1759. 
Sergt. Harman Hagadorn, Sergt. Maas Van Vranken, 

Sergt. Hendrick Veeder, Sergt. John Fort. 

Corporal Peter Sters, Corporal Cornelius Barhydt. 

Drummer, Abraham N. Leythall, (Lighthall). 



CAPTAIN LANSING'S COMPANY. 



95 



Privates : 



Robert Hagadorn, 
Wm. Beth (Bath), 
Albert Vedder, 
Robert Beth, 
Peter Van Vorst, 
Phillip Van Vorst, 
Arent Stevens, 
Tobias Luypard, 
John S. Van Eps, 
Cornelius P. Van Slyck, 
Cornelius Van Slyck, Jr., 
Elias Post, 
Gerrit Tellor, 
Cornelius Van Guyseling, 
Jacob Van Guseling, 
Elias Van Guyseling, 
Ryer Schermerhorn, 
Simon Schermerhorn, 
John Schermerhorn, 
Carel Scherfer, 
John Mercelis, 
Jakel Mercelis, 
Nicholas Vedder, 
Symon Groot, 
Barent Mynderse, 
Johannes Jure Kraft, 
John Dinny, 
Symon Janson. 
Officers 4, Sergeants 4, Corporals 
Total 66. 



Peter Veeder, 

John Steers, 

Abraham Fonda, 

Takeris Van De Bogart, 

Bartal, 

Frederick Clute, 

John Hall, 

Frederick lyuypard, 

Hendrick Charlo, 

Abraham Van Vorst, 

Teron Barhydt, 

Jacob Farlie, 

Petrus Van Der Volgen, 

Jacob S. Vrooman, 

Johannes Bastianse, 

Martin Van Benthuisen, 

Gerrit Wendell, 

Abraham Groot, 

Rikert Van Vraken, 

John Meb, 

Richard James, 

Samuel Bradt, 

Samuel S. Bradt, 

Arent Bradt, 

Jacob Bradt, 

Frederick Bradt, 

Johannes Schoenmaker, 

John Tellor. 

2, Drummer i. Privates 55. 



Captain John Duncan's company contains the honored names of 
Wemple, Wendell and Samuel Fuller, very probably the remainder 
followed their captain into war. Schenectady was devoted to the 
King to the day of the revolution. 



96 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Captain Nicholas Groot's company was Schenectady by a large 
majority. We therefore give the roster of the Schenectady soldiers 
enlisted under Capt. Andrew Truax : 

Capt. Andrew Truax, commissioned Jan. 5th, 1758. 

Lieut. Isaac Glen, commissioned Jan. 5th, 1758. 

Lieut. Peter Truax, commissioned Jan. 5th, 1758. 

Ensign John R. Wemp, commissioned Jan. 5th, 1758. 

Sergt. Reuben Horsford, Sergt. John B. Wendell, 

Sergt. Jacob V. Sice, Sergt. John Henry, 

Corporal John DeGraff, Corporal John B. Marcelis, 



Privates. 



John V. Antwerpen, 
Isaac Marselis, 
John J. Vrooman, 
Wm. DeGraff, 
Arent Marselis, 
Douwe Van Vorst, 
Wessel Wessels, 
Jasper Swart, 
Abraham Yates, 
Jacob Fonda, 
James Leythaal, 
Cornelius Lansing, 
Cornelius Vrooman, 
Arent INIebie, 
Jellis Dirk Van Vorst, 
Gerrit H. Vedder, 
John Van Deusen, 
Blias Groot, 
John Clement, 
Abraham Christiaense, 
Phillip Van Patten, 
John D. V. Antwerpen, 
John Sy. Toll, 
Phillip Van Vorst, 



John IMebie, 
ZegerV. Stanford, 
Abraham Schermerhorn, 
Cornelius DeGraff, 
Jacob Groot, 
Jellis J. Van Vorst, 
Petre Clute, 
Symon Van Patten, 
Arent Clement, 
Arent Vedder, 
Albert H. Vedder, 
John B. Van Eps, Jr., 
Reyer A. Schermerhorn, 
Peter Mebie, 
John V. Vrooman, 
Phillip Steers, 
Jellis D. Van Vorst, 
Thomas Christiaense, 
James Reylie, 
Nicholas Sixbie, 
Folckert Vedder, 
Abraham P. V. Antwerpen, 
John Van Patten, 
Jacob Swart, 



PEACE BEFORE WAR. ■ 97 

Jesse C. DeGraff, Frederick Van Patten, 

John Van Etten, Peter Van Deusen, 

Mathew Van der Heyden, Abraham Truax. 

At last the Great Frederic of Prussia condescended to give peace 
to Europe. All over the continent the seven years' war had lan- 
guished for two years, men seeming to have become utterly weary 
of cutting one another's throats. On the i6th of January, 1763, 
was signed the Treaty of Peace, and as every time the rude artillery 
of that day growled, the musketry in America seemed to spit and 
snap and snarl, blessed rest came to the fighting burgher who, 
brave and heroic as he was, dearly loved his pipe and his calm, 
somnolent evenings. 

The Yankee began to come, capital began to be attracted to the 
village, which, though no longer a frontier town, was a prosperous 
Indian trading post. Emigration began to pour its crowd through 
the river and hills of Woestina, and the track of the glacier at Little 
Falls. Ellice and Duncan and Phynn, Mynderse, DeGraffs', the 
Waltons, the Duanes of the Revolution, the Martins, Craigs and 
Yates', mostly Englishmen, established storage and forwarding 
houses. It was about the first real opportunity in her hundred years 
of life, that the little town had had a chance to grow, and it took 
advantage of it. 

But the rest was destined to be short. Already marching toward 
her was the drum beat of another seven years' war, one that was to 
divide her own household, not between races, but families and kin- 
dred, between father and sons, brothers and neighbors, drawing 
sharply defined lines through streets, houses and homes. 

The Revolution was at hand, and again the weary town, caring 
less for the issue involved than almost any portion of the oppressed 
and tax ridden land, saw the pomp and circumstance of that glori- 
ous war of which she was long ago heartily sick unto death. A 
hundred years of its horror had been enough for a people who could 
fight but did not want to. 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



CHAPTER VIIL 
Schenectady in the Revolution. 

The patriotism of Schenectady was pure, unadulterated and unself- 
ish. Stamp act and tea taxation worried the burghers less than any 
other people in America. Stamped papers, checks and drafts, they 
used, of course, but less of it than the commercial seaports. The 
Mohawk Dutchman was a strangely unambitious soul of extremely 
contented disposition. The moment the genuine Hollander acquired 
that simple revenue which, ridiculously small as it may appear in 
these days, was sufficient for the modest demands of his quiet home, 
he was content to sit on his stoop built in youth or maturity for the 
rest of old age, and watch the procession of the hunters of wealth 
or power go westward. Schenectady was then, as now, on the very 
highway of progress, the turnpike laid out by nature, for the journey 
then beginning from New York around the globe. He saw it all, 
joined in it rarely, wanted to live his uneventful life, and calmly 
wait for its peaceful end. 

He had never suffered from active wrong done him by the Eng- 
lishman as others had. It was the passive injury of her shameful 
neglect, that had been his worst complaint. No troops of the King 
were ever quartered upon him in any unwelcome form. The fort 
had in fact never been garrisoned enough to give him a feeling of 
security against blood-thirsty white and red men. 

All the British officers and men quartered here, seemed always to 
have mingled with, and been part of the people. They were victims 
of the horrors of the massacre of February 9th, helped to hunt down 
the Indian assassins on every occasion, in the chase of the perpetra- 
tors of the Beukendaal massacre, and did all they could to rescue the 
captives. Sir William Johnson, ruler of the District, his Majesty's 
representative was to the manor born, not of their own race but of 



SIR JOHNSON'S HEADQUARTERS. 99 

their own neighbors in the valley, and in spite of his Mormon ten- 
dencies and his bold assumption of the divine right of kings, in the 
matter of morganatic marriages with squaws, was popular, a brave 
warm-hearted man. Schenectady was often his military headquar- 
ters. From here came the Fondas, his commissaries, fathers and 
sons — his officers were largely from here. The Yates brothers, 
Stoeffel and Jellis, had fought under him, the elder, a lad in his 
teens, wounded at Ticonderoga and promoted at Sir William's sugges- 
tion for bravery at Fort Niagara. Campbell, Duncan, the Van Slycks, 
Bradts, Vielies, Vanderbogarts, Vedders, Veeders, Wemples, Mynderses 
Barhydts, in fact all the Dutch families of the valley were on the 
rolls of his battalions and companies. And the loyal element at 
Schenectady was not made up of unpopular men by any manner of 
means. The Yankee was not worshipped here, and the Englishmen 
were not hated. The latter had touched elbows with the early set- 
tlers in many of the alarms constantly sent out, until comradeship 
had become close. Sir William's heart was true. That he stood 
staunchly by the King who had honored him with a baronetcy, and 
the command of all his forces west of Albany, from a strict sense of 
duty, while his heart was divided with love for both, is an open 
secret of history. 

Officers and soldiers of great local renown in Colonial wars 
dropped off the rolls in the Revolution. Campbells, Duncans and 
the Glens, with the exception of the staunch old Quartermaster 
Glen, well and widely known, and others who had fought for the 
King from a decade to a quarter of a century, did not take up arms 
for the Colonies. The Sanders' were staunch friends of King George. 
But these men could hardly be called by the offensive name of Tory, 
with the exception of Duncan, and even he was forgiven. As a rule 
they were allowed to be quiet and silent, and as long as they were 
so, there was none to molest or make them afraid. Schenectady was, 
however, intensely loyal without that murderous bitterness that 
revelled in battle, murder and sudden death. Here our ancestors 
had not the personal insult of being spurned from the foot of the 
throne, there was no Boston massacre, no fights like that of Golden 
Hill in New York, no shooting down of rebels as at Concord and 



loo SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Lexington. The English garrison had always been welcomed, and 
its officers and men had always been in comradeship and good favor 
with the people. 

There were full confidence and faith in the great Sir William, his 
Majesty's viceroy. In his heart, no one doubted in all the stern days 
that followed, that he would have been in many instances in warm 
sympathy with his fellow soldiers of other days. There were no 
battlefields in Schenectady county, no raids on the lovely hill slopes 
and smiling valleys. More than once, notably in the Burgoyne cam- 
paign. Sir William sent his cohorts the other way. Always, to the 
credit of that brave and distinguished officer, whose sad ending has 
been believed to have been due to a broken heart. He denounced, 
and when he dared, punished the ruffians who murdered in defiance 
of the laws of war. The warmest friends and most cherished com- 
rades of the viceroy of the great Georges lived in the little town on 
the wooded plain. The belief of its people after the Revolution 
that Schenectady was under that tender watchfulness that survived 
his death in 1774. It was righteous enough in any brave man's view) 
that a town that had suffered so much from England's neglect, and 
had given so many of its best and bravest to die in her cause, in the 
morning of its first century, should have all the rest and peace that 
war could permit in that century's close. 

In one respect the Tories of the Revolution and the copperheads 
of 1 861 are strikingly similar. They seem to have died childless. 
No one to-day admits that he is a descendant of a Tory, and we can- 
not find anywhere about us those who are confessedly possessed of 
copperhead blood, and if the old soldier of the Civil War will occa- 
sionally meet in his daily walk his old neighbor, who sympathized 
with the rebels against the flag for which he fought, he is kindly 
oblivious to the fact, bestowing the mercy of silence and lets the 
oblivion of years blot out the stain of treason. There were none of 
the genuine breed of Tory in Schenectady of whom history, tra- 
dition, or official record makes any mention, but there were men who 
had made gallant records in the Colonial Wars, who. while they took 
no active part in behalf of the nation, and the sovereign to whom 



SUSPECTED TORIES. loi 

they undoubtedly had a loyalty in their hearts, never turned their 
guns against the scarlet uniform of the King. 

Ellice, Phynn, Duncan, Campbell and Morrison were closely 
watched. They were not Tories, but British subjects, or sons of 
British subjects. A Tory was the American whom the American 
patriot hated, but the British loyalist seems to have been treated with 
indulgence by his fellow citizen. The English born, who remained 
faithful to an English monarch, was tolerated and afterwards freely 
forgiven. The Tory's life was safe nowhere. There were others to 
whom the situation at the outbreak of the war was most distressing. 
Many of them undoubtedly felt, in their hearts, that it was the battle 
between inclination and duty that worried the soul of Sir William 
Johnson. 

The Glenns, the Fondas, the Vanderbogarts, the Van Schaicks, 
the Van Slycks, the Vielies, the Bradts, the Yateses and others had all 
done service in rank or file, as officers, or as soldiers under King 
George, and the disruption of the Empire, proclaimed by the Decla- 
ration of Independence, came upon them as a shock. It was a par- 
ticularly distressing situation for the Yateses whom King George II 
had honored with commissions and with grants of land. It was 
especially painful to the Glens to whom his Majesty's governors 
had given authority in Schenectady ; to the Bradts and Vroomans 
who had been official surveyors, and had laid out the territory of the 
King's dominion, but to the honor of all, or almost all, of the manor 
born, not one of them but rallied to the standard of George Wash- 
ington. In fact, the elder Yates was a Member of Congress of '76, 
his term expiring but six days before the signing of the Declaration 
of Independence. Though lieutenant colonel of Wemple's regiment, 
his relation with the British officers seems to have been close to the 
last, for his daughter, shortly after the Revolution, married Johnson 
Butler, the nephew of the infamous Walter Butler, and Captain 
Alexander McDonald of the British army. It is a singular fact that 
the records show that " Col. Stoeffel," as he was often and affection- 
ately called, loyal enough to fight in the Colonial Wars for the King 
of England, went at once upon the staff of Schuyler, as Glenn did 



I02 ^ SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

on quartermaster duty, and the records of the Revolution from 
which the information in this chapter is strictly derived, do not show 
anywhere that he ever leveled his gun at a British soldier. His 
younger brother Jellis, however, was a fighter all the way through as 
private and lieutanant of the line. 

The precise situation can best be told in what follows, in the 
extracts from the records of the Committee of Public Safety. It 
will be seen that the people fully and thoroughly trusted these men, 
as ardent as they had been in the cause of England, for it will be 
seen that they were members of the Committee of Public Safety. 
In the story of what transpired in the official action of the village 
authorities, in support of their brave country, the historian is deeply 
indebted to the Hon. John Sanders, who has in his industrious 
research and judicious selection collated the interesting facts which 
follow. 

It must, as honest history, be stated as connected with our great 
revolutionary struggle, that the mass of the inhabitants of Schenec- 
tady were devotedly the sons of liberty, and intensely in earnest ; 
but it must be confessed that a few of our most wealthy men were 
prudent and non-committal, and unexceptionally, from habit, would 
pray for the King. 

The first gun was fired and the first blood flowed at Lexington, on 
the 19th day of April, 1775, and on the 6th of May following, at a 
meeting of the freeholders and inhabitants of the township -of 
Schenectady, the following persons were unanimously chosen to be 
a committee of correspondence, safety and protection for the town- 
ship: 

Rinier Mynderse, James Wilson, Hugh Mitchell, Henry Glen, 
Harmanus Wendell, Abraham Oothout, John Roseboom, Christopher 
Yates, Cornelius Cuyler and Jacobus Teller. Christopher Yates, 
(father of Governor Joseph C. Yates), was made chairman ; Hugh 
Mitchell, (grandfather of the late Hon. Thomas B. Mitchell), was 
made clerk. 

A minute book of 162 closely written pages was kept by that com- 
mittee and their successors, now belonging to the library of Union 
College, having been presented to that institution as a valuable relic 



EXTRACTS FROM MINUTES. 103 

of our revolutionary trials by the late Edward Rosa, Esq., and 
although deeply interesting on each page, a few important items are 
selected as extracts, to show how patriotic, multiform and extensive 
were the duties and labors of that committee ; and, in the mass of 
interesting detail, even that selection is difficult. 

This committee met often, and on the 8th of May, 1775, resolved 
that their future meetings should be held at the house of William 
White, located on Church street, where is now the residence of the 
Hon. John A. Deremer. The building was burned down in the dis- 
astrous conflagration of 181 9. 

It was further resolved, that all the members of the committee 
attend the general meeting of the committees of safety, to be held 
at Albany, on the loth inst. 

From the minutes of May i6th, 1775 : 

" Received a letter from the chairman of the committee at Albany 
acquainting this board that Daniel Campbell, Esq., has a quantity of 
gunpowder in store at Albany, which he wishes to take out, but this 
committee refused him that liberty until they acquainted this board 
of the same. 

" Having taken the contents of said letter into consideration, and 
foreseeing the evil consequences that may attend the powder falling 
into the hands of our enemies, 

" Resolved, That this board will purchase the said powder from 
Daniel Campbell, for the use of the inhabitants of this township and 
others who may stand in need thereof." 

Extract from the minutes of May 24th, 1775 : 

" Resolved, That this board do now purchase 335 lbs. of gunpow- 
der from Daniel Campbell, Esq., at 3s. per lb. 

" Resolved, That said powder be delivered in custody of John Post 
and John G. Lansing, and that they dispose of it to the public as 
hereinafter directed. Said Post and Lansing are ordered to dispose 
of the powder at 3s. gd. per pound ; 3s. lod. by the half-pound ; 4s. 
by the quarter, and not to dispose of any of it to any person who 
lives out of the township without an order from a member of the 
committee." 



I04 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

From the minutes of May 28th, 1775 : 

" A sub-committee from the county of Try on waited on this board 
to inform us of the state of affairs in that county, which they looked 
upon to be dangerous in respect to the Indians, and requested a 
supply of powder. 

" Resolved, To furnish them with fifty pounds of powder." 
From the minutes of May 29th, 1/75 : 

" In consequence of a request of the committee of Albany to raise 
one company of men for the Continental service to go to Ticon- 
tarog (Ticonderoga), consisting of one captain, one lieutenant, one 
ensign, three sergeants, three corporals, one drummer, one fifer and 
fifty privates. 

" Resolved, That Cornelius Van Dyck is appointed captain, Benj. 
Hilton, lieut., and Cornelius Van Slyck, ensign, and that the 
utmost dispatch be made in raising said company ; their pay to be as 
follows, viz.: 

" Captain, per month, 6 pounds ; lieut., per month, 4 pounds ; 
ensign, per month, 3 pounds ; sergeants, per month, 2 pounds, 8 
shillings ; corporals, per month, 2 pounds, 4 shillings ; drummer, 
per month, 2 pounds, 4 shillings ; fifers, per month, 2 pounds, 4 
shillings ; privates, per month, 2 pounds, all lawful money of New 
England. 

" Resolved, That every officer and soldier belonging to any of the 
companies now raised or to be raised within this township, sign the 
association recommended by the honorable the Continental Congress) 
and that no person muster or appear under arms in any of the com" 
panics who do not comply with this resolve. 

" Resolved, That instructions be immediately given to Captain 
Van Dyck for raising his company." 

From the minutes of May 31st, 1775 : 

" Captain Van Dyck made application to this board for provision 
for his men, 

" Resolved, That Captain Van Dyck's men be boarded for the 
present at the houses of John Wilson and Robert Moston (Moyston), 
at the rate of one shilling, New York currency, per day per man." 



MINUTES CONTINUED. " 105 

From the minutes of 4tli August, 1775 : 

"This board being informed that Daniel Campbell, Esq., and 
Alexander Ellise intend going up to Niagara and from thence to 
Montreal, 

" Resolved, That Messrs. Campbell and Ellice be sent for and 
examined relative to their intentions of going up the country. 

" Said Campbell and Ellice being sent for and present, declared 
upon their honor that they were going up the country on their pri- 
vate business, and that they would not carry any letters or messages 
of news to or from any person, who was inimical to the American 
cause. 

" Resolved, That Messrs. Campbell and Ellice be permitted to go, 
and that a certificate be given them." 

It will be seen that Messrs. Campbell and Ellice did not possess in 
any eminent degree the confidence of their fellow citizens. They 
have left no descendants. If they had there would be no occasion 
for shame. They were honest, loyal-hearted Englishmen and never 
in any way betrayed their adopted country. 
From the minutes of January 14th, 1776 : 

" Captain John Mynderse with the officers of the Minute Men 
made their appearance before this board with a number of men, and 
set out immediately in sleighs for Albany. 

" Resolved, That orders be immediately sent to Captain John Van 
Patten to place guards at William DeGraff's, Tunis Swarfs and 
Lewis Peck's, to prevent any unfriendly persons or letters from pass- 
ing upwards. 

" Resolved, That the following letter be sent to James McMaster 
and the committee of Warrensbush : 

" Sir — We being suspicious that news may be carried to Johnstown 
of what is now going on here, we are about to place guards on both 
sides of the river to prevent any person from passing upwards who 
are not known to be friends of the American cause ; we, therefore, 
request you will take such steps as will prevent any news passing 
through Warrensbush, and that you will examine all letters you are 
suspicious of." 

Here follow entries of the apprehension and trial of several per- 



io6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

sons charged with being enemies to the American cause, and resulted 
in committing some of them to jail at Albany, among them George 
Murray, Joseph Kingsley and George Ramsey. 

The following extract from the minutes of December 29, 
1775 is given : 

" This board having taken into consideration the custom of the 
inhabitants of this place of firing guns on New Year's day, and find- 
ing said custom to be attended with an unnecessary waste of powder, 
which ought to be particularly prevented at this time, 

"Resolved, That the magistrates be applied to, to use their 
authority in putting a stop to said custom." 
From the minutes of April 13, 1776. 

" James Ellice applied to this board for a certificate of his charac- 
ter to General Schuyler, in order to obtain a pass from him to go up 
the country, 

" Resolved, That on his taking the following affidavit, that the 
trade he carries on is here, and that he intends to carry on if per- 
mitted up the country, is entirely on his own account, and that he is 
noways bound to give or be accountable to either James Phynn, or 
Alexander or Robert Ellice for any part of the profits arising from 
said trade." 

Which having been accomplished, the following certificate was 
given to him : 

" This is to certify that the bearer, Mr. James Ellice, hath signed 
the General Association, and hath not, to our knowledge, done any- 
thing against the American cause of Liberty. 

Given under my hand. 

Dirk Van Ingen, Chairman. 
Schenectady, April i, 1776." 

" James Ellice informed this board that his brother, Robert, 
intends going up the country this spring, and that he intends send- 
ing his clerk, George Forsith, up the country." 

Whereupon the following letter was written by the board : 



APPLICATIONS FOR PASSPORTS. ' 107 

"In Committee Chamber at Schenectady, 

April 13, 1776. 

" Honored Sir — James Ellice, who was just now with this board 
and obtained a certificate that he hath signed the General Associa- 
tion, informed us that his brother, Robert Ellice, intends going up 
the country to settle his business there, and that James Ellice intends 
to send his clerk, George Forsith, uj^ the country. We beg to 
acquaint you that neither of the above named persons hath ever 
signed the General Association, and we look on them to be enemies 
to the American cause of Liberty. 

(Signed) " We are, etc. 

" To the Hon. Philip Schuyler, Major General." 
From the minutes of April 17th, 1776. 

" Received a letter from Daniel Campbell, Esq., requesting a recom- 
mendation from this board, in order to obtain a passport from 
General Schuyler to send' goods up the country to Messrs. Andrews 
and Meldrum. 

" Resolved, That Mr, Campbell cannot have a recommendation from 
this board to General Schuyler. 

" Henry Miller and John Jeffries made application for passports to 
go down the country. 

" Resolved, To give said Miller and Jeffries passports." 
From the minutes of April 2 2d, 1776 : 

"James Stewart, Charles Martin, John Robinson and Andrew 
McFarland made application to this board for certificates in order to 
obtain passports from General Schuyler to go up the country. 

" Resolved, That a certificate be given to each of them, mention- 
ing that they have not signed the General Association, but in other 
respects have appeared to be true friends to the American cause. 

" Robert Ellice and Charles Morrison made application to this 
board for certificates, in order to obtain passports to go up the 
country. 

" The board being of opinion that they were both enemies to the 
cause of American liberty, thereupon 

" Resolved, That they cannot have certificates from this board " 



io8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

It will, from these few extracts, be seen that our revolutionary 
fathers early considered vigilance the hand-maid of liberty, and with 
a few more extracts illustrating the severity of the times, the priva- 
tions and hardships under which our indomnitable forefathers strug- 
gled during the period that tried men's souls, we close the quotations. 

The use of hard money was absolutely forbidden. The following 
extract from the minutes of June 2d, 1779, will show how rigidly 
this enactment was enforced : 

" Information being given to this board that John Empie has sold 
yeast for hard money, he being sent for acknowledged that his wife 
had received some for yeast, but did not refuse to receive paper cur- 
rency as was alleged against him, and declared that he did not know it 
was forbid ; thereupon, 

" Resolved, That the said Empie pay all the hard money back again 
to those persons who have, since the publication of the regulating 
act, paid hard money to said Empie or his wife for yeast, and they 
are desired to pay said Empie, on receipt of the hard money, an 
equal sum in paper currency. 

" It is hoped no such evil practice for the future will be carried 
on, as the buyer and seller will be equally considered as transgressors 
of said act." 

Great efforts were made by the real friends of our revolutionary 
struggles to maintain " the continental paper currency " at the stan- 
dard value of gold and silver ; but gold and silver, as far as was 
known, had not a physical existence in the country in any quantity 
equal to the demands of war, and therefore, as a means to sustain the 
value of their paper, the government prohibited the circulation of coin 
altogether. 

With what success Ramsay's " History of the American Revolu- 
tion," (Vol. II, pages 112 to 122 ), informs us: "The depreciation 
began at different periods in different states, but became general 
about the beginning of the year 1777, and progressively increased for 
three or four years." 

" Towards the end of 1777 the depreciation was three for one ; in 
1778 it was six for one ; in 1779, twenty-eight for one; in 1780, sixty 
for one in the first four or five months. Its circulation was after- 



AFTER THE REVOLUTION. 



109 



wards partial ; but where it passed it soon depreciated to 150 for 
one. 

" In some few points it continued in circulation for the first four 
or five months of 1781 ; but in this latter period many would not 
take it at any rate, and they who did received it at a depreciation of 
several hundreds for one." 



CHAPTER IX. 



After the Revolution — Close of the Century. 

The Revolution had dealt far more gently with Schenectady than the 
Colonial Wars. She had her dead to mourn, sorrows for which the • 
only compensation was the honorable names that left their fragrance 
as the grass grew greener over the graves in the old Dutch grave- 
yard in Green street, or on their unknown little homes unmarked but 
not far away. 

The survivors came back to rejoice in the independence of this 
infant land, but to suffer also in the poverty and depression that 
settled down heavily on a country with no money but rags, but little 
experienced in self-government. Not one of those infant industries 
that we have been of late so generously fostering till they have been 
nurtured into gigantic dimensions, existed. New names with no 
Holland gutteral or Dutch melody in them, began to be known and 
honored. 

Gallant soldiers, officers and men, were in these regiments. Col, 
Abram Wemple did magnificent service. Cornelius Van Dyke, lieu- 
tenant colonel of the First New York Continental, Gen. Philip 
Schuyler's veteran regiment. John Graham, father of the late Mrs. 
Sarah and Deborah Graham of Washington avenue, and Major 
Thornton, were men who achieved high renown. 

These officers were all brave, rigid disciplinarians, and brought 
their regiment to such perfection of drill and soldierly bearing, that 



no SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

the First Veteran New York had no superior in the American army. 
It is not my intention to follow this old regiment through the early 
incidents of the Revolution ; to speak of their brilliant gallantry at 
Saratoga and on the plains of Monmouth ; but, as derived from 
actors in the events, such was the estimate of their steadiness and 
valor, that, on the surrender of Burgoyne at Saratoga, Nicholas Van 
Rensselaer, one of its captains, a grandson of old Patroon Hendrick, 
was deputed by General Gates to carry a captured flag and the news 
of the surrender to the anxious citizens of Albany. A regiment so 
brave, that at the stoiming of Stony Point, July i6th, 1779, General 
Wayne placed this regiment in the front ; and on the storming of 
the two redoubts at Yorktown, late in the afternoon of the 14th of 
October, 1781, where, to excite a spirit of emulation, the reduction 
of the one was committed to the French under the Baron deViomes- 
nil, and the other to the Americans under the Marquis Lafayette. 
Colonel Hamilton himself, of New York, led the advanced corps of 
the Americans, selecting for a part of his column a detachment of 
Van Schaick's veteran regiment, ( First New York, under Major 
Graham ). These troops rushed to the charge without firing a gun, 
and, passing over the abattis and palisades, assaulted the works on all 
sides, and entered with such rapidity that the redoubt was immedi- 
ately carried with inconsiderable loss. The redoubt attacked by the 
French was defended by a greater number of men and therefore 
occupied more time in its reduction. 

Then, too. Major John Thorton of Schenectady was an officer in 
the Revolutionary struggle, full of daring, a hero at Saratoga, and a 
veteran. This was the father of the late Mrs. Volney Freeman of 
our place and of the late Col. William A. Thornton of the regular 
army. 

It must be borne in mind that the militia in the day of the Revo- 
lution was not like the militia of any more modern days. They 
were fighters, and did as much in battle as any troop. The following 
is the Controller's report. (New York in the Revolution, page 9). 

" The extensive fighting done within our borders, brought into 
active and honorable service branches of military, which, in colonies 
where no fighting was done, were relieved. Our militia were the 



REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIERS. • m 

heroes of many hotly contested fields. The battle of Oriskany, in 
its percentages of killed and wounded, the bloodiest battle of the 
war, was won by the militia, and Burgoyne's surrender thereby made 
sure. The militia bore a highly honorable part in the ever memora- 
ble battle of Saratoga. But many men undoubtedly performed 
splendid service in the emergencies which called out the militia, and 
then retired quietly to their homes, leaving no record of their service 
which can now be found. 

Again, the portions of New York occupied by the whites were 
surrounded on almost all sides by tribes of hostile Indians, who were 
incited and led by still more savage whites. Brant was sometimes 
humane, but Butler never. The Hurons had inherited from many 
preceding generations the disposition to make hostile raids upon the 
territory of their ancient foes, the Iroquois. At the breaking out of 
the war the influence of Sir William Johnson over the tribes of the 
Iroquois was almost boundless. His position as Indian agent had 
brought him into close relations with these tribes, and this position 
he seems to have honorably used and to have succeeded in convinc- 
ing them that he was their friend. His mantle, at his death, 
fell upon his son. Sir John, and his son-in-law. Col. Guy Johnson, 
and that they used their influence to the fullest extent to stir up 
Indian hostility to the patriotic citizens west of Albany, is a sad page 
in the history of the war. It required something more or less than 
patriotism to induce the frontiersman, to leave his family with the 
prospects before them of that most horrible of frontier experiences, 
an Indian raid. 

Col. Abraham Wemple was the most prominent commander con- 
nected with the Schenectady regiment, and from " Archives of New 
York, The Revolution, in the Adjutant General's office, the follow- 
ing roll of the regiment is taken as given below. In this regiment 
only the Schenectady names are given : 

Col. Abraham Wemple, 
Lieut. Col. Christopher Yates, 
Major Abraham Swits, 
Major Myndert M. Wemple, 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Adjutant John Van Drnssen, 
Quartermaster Gerrit G. Lansing-, 
Quartermaster Myndert Wemple. 

Captains. 
Thomas B. Bancker, Jellis Fonda, 

John Mynderse, ' Abraham Oothout, 

Jacob Schermerhorn, Abraham Van Eps, 

John Van Patten, Jesse Van Slyck, 

Gerrit S. Veeder, Thomas Wasson. 

Lieutenants. 
Nicholas Barhydt, Jellis A. Fonda, 

William Moore, Jacobus Peek, 

John Roseboom, Jacob Sullivan, 

John Thornton, Daniel Toll, 

Andries Van Patten, Cornelius A. Van Slyck, 

Philip D. Van Vorst, Arent S. Vedder, 

Francis Vedder, Philip Vedder, 

Gerrit S. Veeder, Jr., Walter Vrooman, 

Lawrence Vrooman, Myndert A. Wemple, 

Jellis Yates. 

Ensigns. 

Teunis Swart, Abraham J. Truax, 

Cornelius Z. Van Sanford, Myndert R. Wemple. 

Additional names on State Treasurer's pay books: 
Lieut. Robert Alexander, Lieut. Robert McMichael, 

Lieut. John B. Vrooman. 
Ensign Alexander Crawford, Ensign Fram'r Schermerhorn. 

Enlisted Men: 

Cornelius Barhydt, Cornelius Bradt, 

Jacob Barhydt, Elias Bradt, 

John Barhydt, Ephraim Bradt, 

Lewis Barhydt, Gerret Bradt, 

Cornelius Barhout, Jacobus Bradt, 

Tunes Barhydt, Jacobus A. Bradt, 

James Barhydt, Jacobus S. Bradt, 

John Barope, John Bradt, 

Andrew Barope, John S. Bradt, 



ROSTER OF REGIMENT. 



ii3 



Thomas Barope, 
Lewis Berherdt, 
Tunes Berherdt, 
Samuel S. Bradt, 
Aaron A. Bradt, 
Anthony A. Bradt, 
Aphrieam Bradt, 
Arent A. Bradt, 
Arent S. Bradt, 
Aron Bradt, 
Chas. Bradt, 

Barrett Cain, 
Peter William Caine, 
Warrant Caine, 
Daniel Campbell, 
John Kennedy, Jr., 
Henry Caurl, 
John Caurl, 
Thomas Caurl, 
Asswerus Christianse, 
Isaac Christianse, 
William Kittle, 
Daniel Kittle, 
David Kittle, 
John Kittle, 
Arent Clement, 
Eldert Clement, 
Johannes Clement, 
John Clement, 
Peter Clement, 
Jacob Clute, 
John F. Clute, 

Connels DeOraff, 
Abraham DeGraff, 
Andrew DeGraff, 
Jesse DeGraff, 
John DeGraff, 
John N. DeGraff, 



Mindart Bradt, 
Samuel Bradt, 
Samuel S. Bradt, 
John Brougham, 
Symon Brougham, 
Arent S. Bradt, 
Hendrick Brouwen, 
Richard Brower, 
Abraham Buys, 
James Buys, 

Bartholomew Clute, 
Daniel Clute, 
Frederick Clute, 
Jacob Clute, 
Jacob P. Clute, 
John Clute, 
John B. Clute, 
John Curtis Clute, 
Isaac Clute, 
Peter Clute, 
Petrus Clute, 
Adam Conde, 
Simon Connor, 
Manuel Consale, 
David Consalus, 
David Consaul, 
John Corl, 
John Crawford, 
Isaac Criesteionse, 
Joseph Crawford, 
Adam Conde, 

James DeGollier, 
James DeGollie, 
Joseph DeGollier, 
Abraham Dome, 
John Dome, 
Abraham Douw, 



114 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Simon DeGraff, 
William DeGraff, 

Caleb Parly, 
Jelles P. Fonda, 

William Gerdner, 
Isaac Glen, 
Jacob Glen, 
John Glen; 
John S. Glen, 
Charles Gorden, 
Robert Gorden, 
Joseph Gordon, 
William Gordon, 
Andrew Gregg, 
James Gregg, 
Andrew Gregg, 

Harmanus Hagadorn, 
Alexander Hanna, 
Alexander Hannon, 

John Kennedy, 
Samuel Kennedy, 
John Lambert, 
Abraham G. Lansing, 
Cornelius Lansing, 
John C. Lansing, 
John G. Lansing, 
Gerrit Lansing, 
John Lansing. 
Abraham Lighthall, 

Cornelius Mabee, 
John Mabee, 
John Mabee, Jr., 
Peter Mabee, 
Albert Mabee, 
Arent Mabee, 
Cornelius Mabee, 
John J. Mabie, 



John Duncan, Jr., 

John Fort, 
John D. Forte, 

Abraham Gregg, 
Abraham C. Groat, 
Andrew Groat, 
Cornelius Groat, 
Simon Groat, 
Amos Groat, 
Simon C. Groot, 
Abraham Groot, 
Abraham A. Groot, 
Cornelius Grot, 
Abraham C. Grot, 

Peter Hare, 
Henyost Helmer, 
Abraham Josling, 

Abraham W. Lighthall, 
George Lighthall, 
Nicholas Lighthall, 
Thomas Little, 
David Little, 
Abraham Lythall, 
Abraham W. Lythall, 
William Lythall, 
David Lythall, 

John Marselus, 
Gilrt Marselus, 
Charles Martin, 
John Maseles, 
Juiter Mebie, 
Albert Mebie, 
Henry Merseles, 
Egfsbert Merseles. 



ROSTER OF REGIMENT. 



"5 



Patrick Mabie, 
Aront Mabie, 
Cornelius Maby, 
Alexander McMichael, 
Daniel McMichael, 
James McMichael, 
Peter McMichael, 
James McQuean, 
John Marselis, 
Ahasweras Marselis, 

George Passage, 

George Passage, Jr., 

Thomas Patterson, 

Oliver Patterson, 

Jess Peak, 

Arect Peck, 

Cornelius Peck, 

Daniel Peck, 

Henry Peck, 

Jacobus Peck, 

James J. Peck, 

Jesse Peck, 

John Peck, 
Lewes Peck, 
Arent Peeck, 
Christopher Peeck, 
Cornelius Peeck, 
Cornelius C. Peeck, 
Harmanus Peeck, 
Harmanus H. Peeck, 
Harmanus J. Peeck, 
Henry H. Peeck, 
Jacobus Peeck, 
Jacobus H. Peeck, 
John Peeck, 
John J. Peeck, 

John Reises, 
Andro Rynex, 



Arent Merseles, 
Gysbert Merseles, 
John Mersilus, 
Alexander Mersilus, 
John Mynderse, 
John R. Mynderse, 
Laurence Mynderse, 
Harmen Mynderse, 
Peter Mabie, 
Arent Ouderkerk, 

Joseph Peeck, 
Lewis Peeck, 
Christopher Peeck, 
Daniel Peeck, 
Jacobus Vedder Peck, 
James J. Peck, 
Joseph Peck, 
Lewis Peck, 
John J. Peeke, 
Harmanus Peterson, 
Herman Peterson, 
Charles Petterson, 
Oliver Petterson, 
Thomas Petterson, 
Thomas Phillips, 
Samuel Pruyne, 
Aaron Putman, 

Arent Putman, 

Arent L. Putman, 

Aron L. Putman, 

Cornelius Putman, 

Cornelius L. Putman, 

John Putman, 

Gradus Quack, 

Generadous Quackenbos, 

John Quackenbos, 

Cornelius Ryckerman, 
Cornelius Rykman, 



ii6 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Jacobus Ryley, 
John Robison, 
Isaac Rosa, 
John T, Rosa, 
Elias Rosa, 
John Rosa, 
David Sacie, 
John Sanders, 
Garret Schermerhorn, 
Simen Schermerhorn, 
Andrew Schermerhorn, 
Andris Schermerhorn. 
Aurent Schermerhorn, 
Barnadus Schermerhorn, 
Bartholomew Schermerhorn, 
Henry J. Schermerhorn, 
Jacob Schermerhorn, 
Jacob J. Schermerhorn, 
John Schermerhorn, 
John J. Schermerhorn, 
Nicholas Schermerhorn, 
Reijer Schermerhorn, 
Richard Schermerhorn,, 
Ryer Schermerhorn, 
Rykert Schermerhorn, 
Simon Schermerhorn, 
Reuben Schuyler, 
John Shannon, 
William Shannon, 
Thomas Shennon, 
Christian Shutes, 
Jacobus Teller, 
John Teller, 
William Teller, 
Jacob Ten Eyck, 
Myndert S. Ten Eyck, 
Isaac Terwilliger, 
Jacobus, Terwillig-er, 
Solomon Terwilliger, 



Jacobus Rylie, 
Philip Rylie, 
Andrew Rynex, 
John Rynex, 
Richard Rynex, 

John Smealle, 
John Smilie, 
Gerrit Spitcher, 
Arent Spitser, 
Gerret Spitser, 
George Staley, 
Jacob Stayley, 
John Stevens, 
Daniel Steward, 
David Steward, 
George Steward, 
James Steward, 
John Stewart, 
Daniel Stewart, 
John Stewart, 
James Stuart, 
Jacobus Swart, 
James Swart, 
Nicholas Swart, 
Henry Swits, 
Jacob Swits, 
Jacob Swits, Jr., 
Jacob A. Swits, 
Jacob J. Swits. 
Ruben Symons, 
James Thornton, 
Thomas Thornton, 
Charles Toll, 
John Toll, 
Abraham Truax, 
Abraham J. Truax, 
Abraham P. Truax, 
John Trumbull, 



ROSTER OF REGIMENT. 



117 



Peter H. Vedder, 
Andrew Wagner. 
Garret Van Antwerp, 
Peter Van Antwerp, 
Peter A. Van Antwerp, 
Simon Van Antwerp, 
Simon J. Van Antwerp, 
John Van Antwerpe, 
Peter Van Benthuysen, 
Joseph Van Der Bogart, 
Nicholas Van Der Bog-art, 
Abraham N. Van DeGraff, 
Daniel Van Derhyden, 
David Van Derhyden, 
Daniel Van Derhyder, 
David Van Darhyder, 
Cornelius H. Van Dyck, 
Cornelius Van Dyck, 
Cornelius N. Van Dyck, 
Henry Van Dyck, 
Henry H. Van Dyck, 
Henry I. Van Dyck, 
John Van Eps, 
John B. Van Eps, 
John J. Van Eps, 
Petrus Van Der Volgen, 
Cornelius Van Der Volgen, 
Peter Van Guysling, 
Cornelius Van Guysling, 
Jacob Van Guysling, 
John Vischer Van Ingan, 
John Van Inge, 
Joseph Van Ingen, 
Frederick D. Van Patten, 
Adam Van Patten, 
Frederick Van Patten, 
Ian Van Patten, 
Nicholas Van Patten, 



Peter Van Slyck, 
Jellis Van Voast, 
John D. Van Voast, 
Peter Van Voast, 
Dirk Van Vranken, 
Maus Van Vranken, 
Maus M. Van Vranken, 
Nicholas Van Vranken, 
Nicholas N. Van Vranken, 
Richard Van Vranken, 
Rykert Van Vranken, 
Cornelius Veeder, 
Peter S. Veeder, 
Thelmes Veeder, 
Phil Vielie, 
Albert A. Vedder, 
Alexander Vedder, 
Arent Vedder, 
Barent Vedder, 
Arent A. Vedder, 
Arent T. Vedder, > 
Cornelius Vedder, 
Francis Vedder, 
Frederick Vedder, 
Harmanis Vedder, 
John Vedder, 
John B. Vedder, 
Nicholas Vedder, 
Nicholaes Vedder, 
Peter Vedder, 
Seymon H. Vedder, 
Simon Vedder, 
Halimus Veder, 
Baret Veeder, 
Wilhilmus Veeder, 
Cornelius Veeder, 
Gerret Veeder, 
Gerret S. Veeder, 



i8 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Philip Van Patten, 
Frederick Van Pette, 
Frederick Van Petten, 
Frederick S. Van Petten, 
Henry Van Petten, 
Nicholas Van Petten, 
Nicholas A. Van Petten, 
Nicholas H. Van Patten, 
Nicholas R. Van Petten, 
Nicholas S. Van Petten, 
Philip Van Petten, 
Simon Van Petten, 
Simon F. Van Petten, 
Andrew Van Petten, 
Gerret Van Schaick, 
Abraham Van Sice, 
Cornelis Van Sice, 
Gysbert Van Sice, 
Isaac Van Sice, 
Jacobus Van Sice, 
John Van Sice, 
Aaron Van Sice, 
Andrian Van Slyck 
Adrian Van Slyck, 
Andrew Van Slyck, 
Anthony Van Slyck, 
Cornelius Van Slyck, 
Cornelius A. Van Slyck, 
Cornelius P. Van Slyck, 
Harmanus Van Slyck, 
Harmanus N. Van Slyck, 
Michael Wagner, 
Jacob Walrat, 
Christopher Ward, 
Richard Warner, 
Frederick Weller, 
Robert Weller, 
John Wemple, 
John J. Wemple, 



Helmus S. Veeder, 
John Veeder, 
John B. Veeder, 
Nicholas Veeder, 
Peter H. Veeder, 
Peter S. Veeder, 
Peter T. Veeder, 
Simon B. Veeder, 
Simon H. Veeder, 
Wilhelmus Veeder, 
John Visger, 
John Visger, Jr., 
John Vischer, Jr., 
Adam Vrooman, 
Adam H. Vrooinan, 
Adam S. Vrooman, 
Arent Vrooman, 
Aron Vrooman, 
David Vrooman, 
Hendrick Vrooman, 
Henry Vrooman, 
Jacob A. Vrooman, 
Jacob I. Vrooman, 
Jacob J. Vrooman, 
John B. Vrooman, 
John J. Vrooman, 
John T. Vrooman, 
Simon Vrooman, 
Simon J. Vrooman, 
Nicholas Vrooman, 

John T. Wemple, 
Mindert R. Wemple, 
Myndert Wemple, 
Ahasuerus Wendell, 
John B. Wendell, 
Arent Wessel, 
Arent Wesselse, 
Aorn Wesselse, 



CLOSE OF CENTURY. 

Abraham Yates, Nicholas Yates, 

Abraham J. Yates, Abraham Yates. 

John Yates, 



CHAPTER X. 

The Close of the Century. 

Schenectady could not be said to have emerged from the Revolu- 
tion. The county had never been submerged. The waters had 
divided around it and the burgher had walked through on compara- 
tively dry land in a calm which he had earned by a century of suf- 
fering. 

Then, as now, the situation of the burgh, Dorp as it began to be 
called, enforced its growth. Anything but progress became impos- 
sible. The eyes of the world were on the young nation born in the 
throes of seven years of one of the most wearisome, brave and patient 
struggles for self government in the history of the earth. The path- 
way of emigrant adventure and explorer thronged eastward and 
westward to a new land, over which hung the mirage of gold in its 
mountains, and wealth in its valleys and plains. The highway of a 
countless procession that was in the coming century to establish the 
grandest Republican empire of earth was under the Catskills and the 
Lowereuin of Rotterdam where now an unbroken line of railway 
belts the continent and in a flying house of unchanging luxury and 
splendor, transports the globe trotters by night and day, awake or 
asleep, from sea to sea. 

The calm of a blessed peace settled over the peaceful town on the 
Groot Vlachte, the great beautiful plain that circled out under the 
hills and was girdled by the Mohawk. It was a lovely village of 
magnificent elms, of towering pine on the plain, and graceful willow 
by the river side. The Fort was permitted to rot away, the palisades 



I20 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

which had survived the usefulness of protection, now one by one 
subserved the comfort of the sturdy Dutchman who by the roaring 
fire on the immense hearth smoked his great pendant pipe and drank 
his schnapps, despising the luxury of the cigar and the effeminency 
of tea. Old streets lengthened out, new ones radiated, names 
changed. The aggressive Yankee interloper came and came to stay 
and would not be shouldered out. The burgher watched the caval- 
cade for awhile. But he was a trader, from way back in trading 
Holland, shrewd, cautious, close but honest as the sunlight. 

So it happened that as the century drew near to its close the 
ending of the i8th as of the 19th, was marked by the commingling 
of races and the infusion of new young blood that acted like an 
elixir to its prosperity. For despite the suffering imposed upon busi- 
ness by a worthless currency and the erection of a national edifice 
on lines which were new and experimental and which the genius 
of Hamilton, Gallatin and John Jay had not perfected into stable 
government, the town prospered and grew proportionally equal to 
any in the leading state of the young union. 

It was a busy town and a heterogeneous one, in population and 
architecture. On the old quadrilateral bounded by Front, Ferry and 
State streets and Washington avenue, the old steep roofs and gabled 
ended houses so much derided in later days by Captain Maryatt, who 
lied more amusingly in his American visit than he did in his English 
novels, still stood, so massively built with their enormous beams that 
but for the terrible conflagration of 181 9, many would have been 
standing to-day. The Dorpian loved his home, endured its ugliness 
for it was stuccoed with the beauty of youthful memories and family 
tradition. He met with true Dutch stolidity the sneer of the cosmo- 
politan bewigged and ruffled shirted swell from New York. Inside 
the homely shell there were polished floors, walls and heavily raf- 
tered rooms, radiant with cleanliness reflecting in every nook and 
corner, the living forms of his living and the shadowy outlines of 
his beloved dead. " Giving him the laugh " never fazed the 
Mohawker. He met it with the marble heart and smoked placidly 
on his stoop in homely, but solid comfort. 

Business was all centered in the west end. Great storaofe and for- 



BOAT BUILDING. 12 1 

warding warehouses of Yates, Mynderse, Pliynn, Ellice, Jacob S. 
Glen & Co., Duncan, Stephen N. Bayard, Walten & Co., Luther & 
McMichael stretched from the Frog Alley Bridge, now crossed by the 
Street Railway Company to the present site of the Mohawk Bridge. 
Great docks, built on heavy piles, extended out in the stream and a 
river commerce of grand volume, building up splendid fortunes for 
its promoters, began to actually whiten the Mohawk with sails of the 
Durham boat. From near Governor's Lane to the poor pasture, 
given for the use of the peasantry by the generous provisions of the 
will of Hans Jans Enkluys, was the Strand. Here was founded in 
the last part of the century an immense boat-building industry. 

Nearly all the boats used on the IMohawk and western waters^ 
were built at this place. The boat yards were located on what is 
termed the Strand street on the river, then much wider than now, 
owing to encroachments and other causes. 'It was no uncommon 
sight in the War of 181 2, to see from twenty-five to 100 boats on the 
stocks at the boat yards, extending from near the Mohawk bridge to 
North street. The boats that conveyed the army of General Wilkin- 
son down the St. Lawrence river were all built at this place ; the oak 
forests of our common lands furnished the requisite materials in 
great supply. The principal boat-builders were the Van Slycks, 
Marselis', Veeders and Peeks, although there were others. The 
boat-builders were generally residents of Front and Green streets. 

Encroachments, the building of the Mohawk Bridge, the disap- 
pearance of the waters from the face of the earth as in the survival 
of Noah, and the destruction of forest timber in the Adirondacks, 
has shrunken the Mohawk tremendously in the century and a quar- 
ter since the Revolution. It was then a deep, broad stream, broken 
by rifts but far scarcer and much deeper than now. 

It is astonishing as we look at the Mohawk now, to learn what it 
once was. The story of its ancient commercial glory is well told by 
Judge Sanders in his quaint style illumined occasionally by old- 
fashioned rhetoric. He thus described the commerce of the 
Mohawk : 

"Up to about the year 1740, the early settlers used the largest 
sized Indian bark canoe, the graceful craft, which had glided on the 



122 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

bosom of the Mohawk, probably for centuries before. But about, or 
soon after that time, the later Indian traders, William, afterwards 
Sir William Johnson, John Duncan, John Robinson, William Cor- 
lett, Charles INIartin, James Ellice, Daniel Campbell and others, tak- 
ing a wide step in advance of the time-honored canoe, introduced 
the small bateau, a wooden vessel strongly manned by three men. 
Simms says, in his histon,- of Schoharie County, containing interest- 
ing memoranda of the Mohawk valley, page 141 : " These boats 
w^ere forced over the rapids in the river with poles and ropes, the 
latter drawn by men on the shore. Such was the mode of transport- 
ing merchandise and Indian commodities to and from the west, for a 
period of about fifty years, and until after the Revolution. There 
were carrying places along the route. Of course, the first was at 
Little Falls. A second place was near Fort Stanwix (Rome) from 
the boatable waters of the INIohawk to W^ood Creek ; thence passing 
into Oneida Lake, the bateaus proceeded into the Oswego river, 
and thence to Oswego, on Lake Ontario, and to Niagara, or elsewhere 
on that lake, on the St. Lawrence, as they pleased to venture," and 
after being carried around the falls of Niagara to Chippewa, went 
uninterruptedly on to Detroit, their usual limit, and sometimes even 
to Mackinaw. But after the Revolutionary War, the tide of immi- 
gration set strongly westward, and that energetic population required 
increased facilities of transportation and communication with the 
great Hudson river, and their old homes in the east and elsewhere. 
What was to be done ? Just emerged from a sanguinarv^ and 
exhausting struggle, the State and the people were impoverished. 
The expense of the canal could not be thought of, and dreams of 
railroads, steamboats and electricity put to service, were only the 
far off fancies of visionary men, born prematurely. 

'' But something must be done. General Philip Schuyler, that 
far-seeing statesman of Revolutionary^ fame, who as major-general had 
rendered his country invaluable services in her most trying periods, 
who had been a United States senator and was then sur^'e}'or-general 
of the State of New York, succeeded in forming a corporate body 
known as the " Inland Lock Navigation Company," of which body 
many citizens of Schenectady and vicinity were members. With 



LABORIOUS BOATING. 123 

such capital, General Schuyler, under his immediate supervision and 
direction, constructed a dam and sluice, or short canal, at Wood 
Creek, uniting it with the navigable waters of the Mohawk ; and 
also built a short canal and several locks at Little Falls ; in both 
cases obviating portage, or the necessity of unloading the vessels. 
Those works were completed in 1795, and from that date, or soon 
thereafter, those enterprising forwarders, Jonathan Walton, Jacob 
S. Glen, Eri Lusher, Stephen N. Bayard and others, erected addi- 
tional wharves, docks and large storehouses on the main Bennekill, 
and the commerce of Schenectady, with the increased facilities of 
navigating the Mohawk, was largely extended until the great fire of 
18 19. The Durham boat, constructed something in shape like a 
modern canal boat, with flat bottom, and carrying from eight to 
twenty tons, took the place of the clumsy little bateau which had 
for more than fifty years superseded the Indian bark canoe. These 
Durham boats were not decked except at the front and stern ; but 
along the sides were heavy planks partially covering the vessel, with 
cleats nailed on them, to give foothold to the boatmen using poles. 
Many of the boats fitted for use on the lakes and St. Lawrence had 
a mast, with one large sail, like an Albany sloop. The usual crew 
was from six to eight men. At that day boatmen at Schenectady 
were numerous, and generally were a rough and hardy class ; but 
from common labors, exposures and hardships, a sort of brotherly 
affection for each other existed among them which did not brook the 
interference of outsiders, and yet as a class, they were orderly, law- 
abiding citizens. 

" Boating at this period was attended with great personal labor. 
True, the delay of unloading and carriage at the Little Falls had 
been overcome, but it was found more difficult to force large than 
small craft over the rapids. In view of that difficulty, several boats 
usually started from port in company, and those boats first arriving 
at a rift, at a low water stage, awaited the approach of others that 
their united strength might lighten the labor there. At high water 
with favorable wind, they could sail the navigable length of the 
river ; but when sails were insufficient, long poles were used. These 
poles had heads of considerable size that rested against the shoulder 



124 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

of the boatman, while pushing onward ; and as has often been seen 
the shoulders of the boatmen became calloused by such labor, like 
that of a severe collar-worn horse. The toil of a boatman's life, 
when actually at work, was generally severe and trying, so that, in 
port, like the sailor, they were sometimes festive and hilarious. 

" It is a matter of curious history in the travel of the Mohawk 
Valley, that about the year 1815, Eri Lusher established a daily line 
of packet boats which were constructed after the model of the Dur- 
ham boat, with cabin in midship, carefully cushioned, ornamented 
and curtained, expressly calcutated for and used to carry from twenty 
to thirty passengers at a time, between Schenectady and Utica, 
making the passage between the two places down the river in about 
thirteen hours, and up the river, with favorable wind and high water, 
within two days." 

Line boats, so-called, built entirely for passenger traffic, right 
after the building of the canal, carried passengers through its whole 
length, changing at Utica, Syracuse, Rochester to Buffalo. Emi- 
grants poured along the great waterway by thousands and crowded 
the holds and the decks of a species of conveyance that before the 
full development of railway traffic, were as filthy as they were re- 
munerative. All this disappeared on the development of the rail- 
road and in 1850 there was not a vestige of passenger traffic upon 
the canal. 

Grand old officers of the Revolution and men with names already 
distinguished in the annals of their country, came here in the late 
afternoon and the still evening of the peacefully closing century. 
Straight from Paunce's tavern, with their hands yet warm from the 
farewell grasp of the great Washington, came General William 
North, bringing with him as his guest. Baron Steuben, on whose 
staff North was chief. The grand old house that he built in Duanes- 
burgh still stands in decaying beauty. Yet there are those still living 
who remember the charming manor where survivors of the Revolu- 
tion drank and smoked and one of them resonantly swore. For the 
old baron surpassed in profanity any general of the famous army 
that "swore terribly in Flanders" and startled more than once the 
grave and stately commander-in-chief whose fame was resounding^ 



A RENOWNED OFFICER. 



25 



through the world. Steuben could and did discipline an army that 
triumphed over the finest soldiers of Europe. He controlled other 
men with grand ability, and yet he could not control himself, and 
when he was mad, and that was not seldom, they say his oaths could 
be heard on the sacred threshold of the Duane* church, two miles 
away. The grand old house is, after all, the most historic of all, 
except the Glen house on Washington avenue, and the old mansion 
in Scotia. General North was a renowned officer, an intimate friend 
of Washington, under whom, in 1798, he was the adjutant-general of 
the United States army. Through the magnificent Rose Lane, half 
a mile long, banked on either side with every variety of shade, color 
and -beauty of that gorgeous flower, came as his guests the conquerors 
of England and the founders of a mighty nation. 

The story of the Norths and Duanes is the history of the Duanes- 
burgh of old. The life of North is fully told by the exquisite epi- 
taph taken from his tomb in the church yard of the village : 

" In memory of William North, a patriot of the Revolution. 

He entered the army of his country 

in his nineteenth year, and was among the first 

of that generous band who in youth stepped forth 

in defence of her liberties 

and devoted their manhood to her service. 

As an officer he served throughout the war in various 

grades, till at the peace which confirmed his 

country's National existence. 

He retired to private life, whence he was called by the 

voice of his fellow citizen whom he served in 

various civil capacities. 

He was 

Aide-de-camp to the Baron De Steuben 

Adjutant and inspector general of the army 

commanded by Washington in the year 1798 

one of the first canal commissioners 

Speaker of the House of Assembly 

and Senator in Congress 

of this his adopted State 



126 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

A pure patriot, a brave soldier, 

an exemplary citizen. 

Born in Maine in 1755, 

Died in the city of New York, 

Jan. 3d, 1836." 

Thither through the same Rose Lane came in his old days, laden 
with honors, the distinguished Judge James Duane, the builder and 
generous endower of the little church in Duanesburgh, the most 
independent little pastorage in America. The bounty of Duane has 
protected church and rectory from the blight of religious mendi- 
cancy. It is to be regretted that space will not permit the grand 
eulogy of Judge Sanders upon the life and character of this one of 
Schenectady's most eminent citizens. The exquisite epitaph upon 
his tomb must suffice for his biography. 

" To the honor of Christ 

and to the welfare of the people 

of Duanesburgh, this church was erected 

by the Honourable JameS Duank, Esquire, 

whose remains here rest until that day which shall 

give to the patriot, the man of Virtue, and the Christian 

the Plaudit of a God. 

Eminent at the Bar, enlightened and impartial as a Judge. 

To the knowledge of a Statesman, 

the manners of a gentleman were joined, 

and all the domestic Virtues, the Social affections were his. 

Planted in the Wilderness of his hand, people of Duanesburgh 

you were his children ; imitate his Virtue, 

Adore the Deity, love your country, love one another. 

To the Memory 

of her dear departed friend : 

his Widow Partner, 

has erected this Monument 

due to his worth, to her affection 

and her grief. 

Born Feb. 6th, 1732. Died Feb. ist, 1797." 



WASHINGTON'S VISITS. 127 

General North married the daughter of Judge Duane. No record 
of his children, if he had any, seems attainable. The name has 
never appeared since its distinguished possessor died. None of the 
name of Duane lives among us, though but a few years ago it was 
borne by men loved by all of us who knew so many of them so well^ 
The descendants of Judge Duane have attained high rank in the 
army, the last soldier of the race dying but a few years ago a General 
and Chief of Engineers in, the U. S. Army. And hundreds of old 
timers remember well that charming coterie of brother gentlemen of 
the old school, the " Doctor," the " Baron," the " Colonel " and the 
" Major " and " Farmer " Mumford. 

Washington visited Schenectady on three different occasions dur- 
ing the latter part of the century. Of one of these visits there is 
record proof, of the others sufhcient evidence to establish authen- 
ticity. Judge Sanders supplies the proof and his account is quoted 
in full. 

" As connected with the history of Schenectady's Revolutionary 
incidents and as the question has frequently been asked, ' When and 
how often has General Washington visited this place ? ' I deem it not 
inappropriate to state here the information I have on the subject, 
thus : I answer, three times, as derived from my father and other citi- 
zens." 

" The first occasion was a hurried visit, soon after the commence, 
ment of the Revolutionary War, to make arrangements for frontier 
defense. He then dined and lodged at the residence of John Glen 
(the Swartfigure house on Washington avenue), who was then quar- 
termaster of the department, and his brother, Henry Glen, deputy, 
stationed at Schenectady. He also took tea at the residence of my 
grandfather, John Sanders." 

"The second occasion was while at Albany in 1782. General 
Washington was invited by the citizens of Schenectady to visit the 
place, which invitation he accepted ; and in company with General 
Philip Schuyler rode there in a carriage from Albany, on the 30th of 
June. He was received with great honor by the civil and military 
authorities, and a public dinner was given him at the hotel of Robert 
Clinch, situated on the south corner of State and Water streets 



128 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

(destroyed in the great fire of 1819, and one of the houses spared in 
the destruction of 1690). Robert Clinch came to America as a drum- 
major under General Braddock, and was well known by General 
Washington, a fact which added much to the interest of the occasion." 

" At the dinner table were assembled the principal citizens of the 
place ; and as guests, Generals Washington and Schuyler, Colonels 
Abraham Wemple and Frederick Vischer ; the last, one of the sur- 
viving heroes of the sanguinary battle of Oriskany. As a mark of 
honor, Washington assigned the seat on the right, next his own, to 
the gallant Vischer." 

" An address was made to Washington, and before he returned to 
Albany he wrote the following reply : 

' To THE Magistrates and IMilitary Officers of the Town- 
ship OF Schenectady : 

Gentlemen — I request you to accept my warmest thanks for your 
affectionate address. In a cause so just and righteous as ours, we 
have every reason to hope the Divine Providence will still continue 
to crown our arms with success, and finally compel our enemies to 
grant us that peace, upon equitable terms, which we so ardently 
desire. 

' INIay you, and the good people of this town, in the meantime be 
protected from every insidious and open foe ; and may the complete 
blessings of peace soon reward }Our arduous struggle for the estab- 
lishment of the freedom and independence of our common country. 

GEORGE WASHINGTON. 

Schenectady, June 30th, 1782.' " 

" To correct the mis impressions of some as to the hotel, I remark 
that Thomas B., the son of Robert Clinch, subsequently kept a 
public house in the old Arent Bradt building. No. 7 State street, sub- 
sequently at Clinch's hotel (afterwards called the Sharratt House, 
now supplanted by the Myers Block), and died 22nd of IMay, 1830." 

" The third occasion was during Washington's tour through the 
country in 1786, as far west as Fort Stanwix, in company with Gov- 
ernor George Clinton, General Hand and many other officers of the 
New York line. In passing through Schenectady, he again quar- 



THE RISING CITY. 129 

tered at the hotel of his old army acquaintance, Robert Clinch. Yet 
the precise date I cannot fix." 

But Judge Sanders failed to learn or note that the Great Soldier on 
his third visit, which was in the early summer, rode out on horse- 
back one fine morning to visit the officer, whom he was to make his 
chief of staff and to greet the sturdy German who had mobilized his 
army. 

So Rose Lane gained an added glory, as the First President of the 
Union in the majestic beauty of his old age rode through the flowers. 
The soldier mansion so different from Valley Forge received a new 
baptism of renown as the greatest man of the century greeted his 
comrades of the sterner days. 

There is only a shell there now, little left but the glorious air of 
the hill side; the smiling valley, and the little church nestling on the 
slope beyond are still there. 

" You may break, you may shatter the vase if you will. 
But the scent of the roses hangs 'round it still." 

Standing on the porch where the great of Schenectady and the 
earth have stood a hundred years before, the aroma of memory needs 
not the scent of the Rose Lane to recall the splendor of the scene, 
and the story of the old house, beautiful in its ruin, grand in its 
decay. 

In the city as it was in 1798, business was booming but its centre 
was along Washington avenue from the Freeman House to Front 
street and then east to where Front street dwindled to a cow path. 
Stores of greater pretensions, the little shops with diamond paned 
windows set with lead lined the streets. This was no mere way 
station on canal and railroad as it became in the first half of the 
coming century, but the head of water navigation, the most impor- 
tant post on the main highway to the far west as Ohio then was. 
The young city boomed in the evening of the eighteenth century as it 
has in the latter quarter of the nineteenth. It was a far more flour- 
ishing borough in 1770 than it was in 1870. 

" Travel was difficult but brisk. The old stage route from Albany 



I30 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

to this city was changed from the twenty mile distance, via the 
Norman Kil to the direct sixteen mile journey of to-day." 

Judge Sanders says: " In the spring of 1793, Moses Beal, who 
kept a first-class hotel in a large brick building (since then burned 
down) on the site of the present Edison hotel building, ran a stage for 
the accommodation of passengers from Albany to Schenectady, Johns- 
town and Canajoharie, once a week. The fare was three cents a 
mile. The success of this enterprise was so great, that John Hud- 
son, keeping the Schenectady Coffee House, on the southwest corner 
of Union and Ferry streets, now the property of Madison Vedder, 
Esq., soon afterwards established a line of stages to run from Albany 
to Schenectady three times a week. John Rogers of Ballston, ran a 
line from that place to connect with it, by which a regular commun- 
ication was first established for the convenience of those who visited 
the Springs. 

" And such was the progress of the new country and the call for 
facilities, that in 1794, there were five great post routes centering in 
Albany : The first, to New York ; the second, to Burlington, Ver- 
mont ; the third to Brookfield, Massachusetts ; the fourth to Spring- 
field, Massachusetts. ' On each of these routes the mail was carried 
once a week. The fifth route was via Schenectady, Johnstown, 
Canajoharie, German Flats, Whitestown, Old Fort Schuyler, Onon- 
daga, Aurora, Scipio, Geneva, Canandaigua, and subsequently 
extended to Buffalo. The mail on this route was carried once in 
two weeks by Thomas Powell, Aaron Thorpe, Asa Sprague and 
others in partnership with them, west of Utica, were the leading pro- 
prietors of this last route, under whose management its business 
became simply immense, so much so, that during the War of 1812, 
it was no uncommon scene to witness from eight to twelve stages on 
the Scotia dyke, leaving or entering Schenectady at one time ; and 
in one instance, as many as fourteen were counted in a continuous 
line." 

Meanwhile the burgh grew from hamlet to village, and from vil- 
lage to city, harrassed with politics and political dissension. Primo- 
geniture, inherited authority, was the curse of New York politics in 
the eighteenth century, as the Erie canal is the slack rope on which 



POLITICAL HISTORY. 



131 



politicians have danced with the balance pole of patronage in the 
nineteenth. Judge Sanders has admirably condensed the record 
of the growth to city hood and to him history is indebted for 
the briefest, truest account possible. 

Let us now return to Schenectady's earlier days. 



CHAPTER XL 
Political History of Schenectady. 

Swear Tennis Van Velsen was the only son of the old proprietor 
,who was killed at the burning of Schenectady in 1690, twenty-eight 
years after its first settlement. William Teller, another proprietor, 
had a short time previously removed to New York, leaving his son 
John in charge of his interest, and Jacques Cornelise Van Slyck, also 
a proprietor, although he escaped the massacre, died of pulmonary 
disease a few months afterwards. All the remaining or other pro- 
prietors were resting, after the struggles of pioneer life, under the 
green sods of their own loved valley. 

The original proprietors had divided the first grant among them- 
selves ; but as emigration population increased, sales and transfers to 
new comers and divisions to descendants, as usual in all new settle- 
ments, necessarily took place, and then came a cry for a pasture 
land and a little more tillage ground. The village and vicinity had 
increased rapidly, and to breathe more freely, these sagacious and 
earnest frontiersmen, for comfort's sake, required more room. Con- 
sequently, confidently backing up their application with an unusu- 
ally valuable consideration, they applied to their friends, the gallant 
and generous Mohawks, and these noblemen of the woods, hills, 
streams and valleys of this beautiful region, being thereunto moved 
somewhat by affection, and other valid considerations, certain of 
their chiefs, the representatives of the four Mohawk castles, for them- 



132 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

selves and the true and lawful owners of the land in their deed men- 
tioned, by their certain writing of sale, dated the 3d day of July, 
1672, gave and granted unto Sander Leenderse Glen, Jan Van Eps 
and Swear Teunise Van Velsen, as being empowered by the inhabi- 
tants of the town or village of Schenectady and places adjacent, for 
that purpose, a certain tract or parcel of land, beginning at the 
Mauquas river, by the town of Schenectady, and from thence runs 
westerly, on both sides of the river, to a certain place called by the 
Indians " Canaquariseny," being reputed to be three Dutch or Eng- 
lish miles ; and from said town of Schenectady, down the river, one 
Dutch or four English miles to a kill or creek called " Ael Plass," 
and from the said Mauquas river into the woods, south towards 
Albany to the Sand Kil, one Dutch mile, and as much on the other 
side of the river north, being one Dutch mile more. This Indian 
title was confirmed by Governor Dongan in 1684, in which confirm- 
ation all the recitals of the Indian title are contained, and gives, 
grants and confirms unto William Teller, Ryer Schermerhorn, Swear 
Teunise Van Velsen, Jan Van Eps and Myndert Wemp, on behalf of 
the inhabitants of the town of Schenectady and places adjacent 
thereto, their associates, heirs, successors and assigns, the before- 
recited tract and tracts, etc., as therein contained, reserving as a quit- 
rent, for the use of his Ro3al Highness, forty bushels of good 
winter wheat, to be paid at Albany on the 25th day of March in 
each year thereafter. This is the true boundary of the original town- 
ship and subsequent city of Schenectady, and represents the present 
city and the towns of Rotterdam and Glenville, as they now exist. 

Of these five trustees, three. Swear Teunise Van Velsen, Jan Van 
Eps and Myndert Wemp, were killed at the burning of Schenectady 
in 1690. William Teller had removed to New York in 1692, leav- 
ing Ryer Schermerhorn, the only surviving actor of the trust. He 
being such surviving trustee in 1705, was complained of by a large 
number of the citizens for exercising arbitrary power over the town 
affairs, and rendering no account of his proceedings. These discon- 
tents resulted in an application to Lord Cornbury, governor in chief, 
who, by a new patent dated April i6th, 1705, appointed Peter 
Schuyler, John Alexander Glen, Adam Vrooman, Daniel Johnson 



FIRST TRUSTEES. 



'33 



and John Baptist Van Eps, new trustees, with full powers to call 
Ryer Schermerhorn, the old trustee, to account, etc. It will be 
observed that, in this grant, Ryer Schermerhorn being the party to 
account, his name was omitted as a trustee, and that of Peter Schuy- 
ler, a new resident, introduced. 

But to quiet angry dissensions among the citizens, and for other 
sufficient reasons, another patent was issued by Honorable Robert 
Hunter, then governor, on the 6th day of November, 1714, super- 
seding the trustees appointed in 1 705, and appointed in their stead, 
Ryer Schermerhorn, Jan Wemp, Johannis Teller, Arent Bradt and 
Baret Wemp, as trustees. 

Of those trustees, Ryer Schermerhorn died February 19th, 17 19; 
John Teller died May 28th, 1725 ; Barent Wemp died in 1748, and 
Jan Wemp died October nth, 1749, leaving Arent Bradt as the sole 
surviving trustee in 1749. This Arent Bradt was the individual who 
built the ancient house. No. 7 State street, and, after being a trustee 
for fifty-two consecutive years, dying in 1767, left a will appointing 
his successors. 

The persons so named in this will, or their successors, continued 
as such trustees until the city charter was granted March 26th, 1798, 
when all their power passed into the hands of the mayor, aldermen 
and Commonalty of the city of Schenectady. 

Previous to this, (23d October, 1765), Schenectady was created a 
borough, with the rights and immunities incident to such corpora- 
tions, contained in an exceedingly detailed charter of forty-eight 
pages, now treasured among the archives of the Common Council ; 
and under that charter Isaac Vrooman, Esq., (a grandson of the gal- 
lant Adam Vrooman, our hero of 1690), was the first mayor, and 
John Duncan, Esq., (our distinguished trader), the first recorder, and 
Schenectady was entitled to send a member to the Provincial Legis- 
lature. Westchester was the only other borough town in the colony 
entitled to like privileges. 

At this point, it seems fitting to make mention of some old resi- 
dents, who honorably held office in early days. It certainly is inter- 
esting to some of their descendants. No note is made subsequent to 



134 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

the time of the adoption of the second New York State Constitution 
in February, 1822, of the convention that formed which John San- 
ders, Judge Sanders and Henry Yates, Jr., were members, for all after 
that period belongs to Schenectady's later days. 

Martin Krigier was a delegate the 26th of November, 1653, to the 
first convention ever held in the New Netherlands. 

Ludovicus Cobes was Sheriff of Albany county (Schenectady 
forming a part), 1679. 

Ludovicus Cobes was County Clerk of Albany county (Schenec- 
tady forming a part), 1669. 

Jan Janse Schermerhorn was member of Leisler's Assembly in 
1690. 

Karl Hansen Toll was member of the General Assembly in 161 5, 
1626. 

Jacob Glen was member of General Assembly in 1726, 1727, 1728, 

T-7?>7^ 1748, 1750- 

Arent Bradt was member of the General Assembly in 1737, 1743, 

1745, 1748- 

Abraham Glen was member of the General Assembly in 1743, 

1745- 

Nicholas Schuyler was member of the General Assembly in 1727, 
1728. 

Jacob Van Slyck was member of the General Assembly in 1750, 

1752- 

Isaac Vrooman was member of the General Assembly in 1759, 
1761. 

Ryer Schermerhorn was member of the General Assembly in 
1761. 

Jacobus Mynderse was member of the General Assembly in 1752, 
1759, 1768, 1775. 

Nicholas Groot was member of the General Assembly in 1761, 
1768. 

Henry Glen was member of the First, Second and Third Provin- 
cial Congresses in 1775, 1776. 

Henry Glen was member of Assembly in 1786, 1787 and 1810. 



MEMBERS OF ASSEMBLY 135 

Henry Glen was member of the Third, Fourth and Sixth Con- 
gresses of the United States from 1793 to 1802. 

Harmanus Peek was member of the Sixteenth Congress of the 
United States from 18 19 to 182 1. 

William North was member of Assembly, 1792, 1794, 1795, 1796 
and 1 8 10, and several times speaker of that body. In 1798, during 
a recess of the legislature, he was appointed a Senator of the United 
States by Governor John Jay, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the res- 
ignation of John Closs Hoburt, appointed Judge of the United States 
District Court, New York. During the Revolutionary War General 
North was the aide of Baron Steuben. 

Joseph Shurtliff was member of Assembly, 1798, 1799, 1800, 1802, 
1804, 1805, 1806, 1807 and 1813. 

James Boyd was member of Assembly, 181 1, 1812. 

John Young was member of Assembly, 1811, 1812. 

Alexander Combs was member of Assembly, 1812, 181 3. 

Abraham Van Ingen was member of Assembly, 18 14. 

Lawrence Vrooman was member of Assembly, 18 14, 181 5. 

John Victory was member of Assembly, 181 5, 18 17. 

Harmanus Peek was member of Assembly, 1816. 

Harry Fryer was member of Assembly, 181 6. 

Harmanus Van Slyck was member of Assembly, 181 7. 

Daniel L. Van Antwerp was member of Assembly, 181 8. 

Simon A. Veeder was member of Assembly, 181 8. 

James Frost was member of Assembly, 1819. 

Simon Groot .was member of Assembly, 181 9. 

Christian Haverly was member of Assembly, 1820. 

Marinus Willet was member of Assembly, 1820. 

Richard McMichael was member of Assembly, 182 1. 

Gerrit Veeder was member of Assembly, 1821. 

James Walker was member of Assembly, 1822. 

John F. D. Veeder was member of Assembly, 1822. 

Robert Yates was a lawyer of eminence. He was a member of 
the first, second, third and fourth Provisional Congresses of New 
York ; was member of the first Convention of New York, in 1777, 



136 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

to form a constitution, and a member of the committee to draft it ; 
was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of New York, and 
finally its Chief Justice ; his term expired by the constitutional limit 
of sixty years. He was a member of the Convention of 1788 to 
ratify the Federal constitution. 

Rinier ^lynderse was Senator of the first Constitution, 1777 to 
1781. 

John Sanders was a Senator under the first Constitution, 1799, 
1800, 1 801, 1802, and member of the Council of Appointment in 
1800. His associates were DeWitt Clinton, Ambrose Spencer and 
John Roseboom. John Jay was then Governor and presiding officer. 

Simon Veeder was a Senator under the first Constitution from 
1804 to 1806. 

Joseph C. Yates was Senator under the first Constitution from 
1806 to 1808, when his seat became vacant by accepting a seat of 
Judge of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. He 
became Governor of the State in 1822. 

Henr>' Yates, Jr., was a Senator under the first Constitution from 
1810 to i8i4and from 1818 to 1822. He was also a member of the 
Council of /Appointment in 181 2, 1818, when Daniel D. Tompkins 
was Governor. 

Gerrit S. Veeder was the first Judge of the Schenectady Court of 
Common Pleas, appointed soon after the organization of the county 
in 1809. 

William James Teller was the first Surrogate aj)pointed in 1809. 

Henry Yates, Jr., and John Sanders were the first members from 
Schenectady county to the convention to form the second Constitu- 
tion for New York, and after its adoption in February, 1822. Ofii- 
cers belong to the history of Schenectady's latter days. 

As already stated, Schenectady was chartered as a city, March 26, 
1798, and its corporate title was "the Mayor, Aldermen and Com- 
monalty of the city of Schenectady," and its area was one of the 
largest cities known to any age — twelve miles in length, by eight in 
breadth. The first ward embraced all that compact part of it lying 
between Union street and the Mohawk river ; the second ward, that 
part lying south of Union street and extending a short distance upon 



MAYORS OF CITY. 



137 



the Bouwlandt ; the third ward, what is now the town of Rotterdam 
and the fonrth ward, what is now the town of Glenville. 

By the charter, the mayor was to be appointed by the governor and 
conncil, and each ward was entitled to elect two aldermen and two 
assistants. Hon. Joseph C. Yates was the first mayor, a man then noted 
for legal ability, and snbseqnently more distinguished as a Supreme 
Court Judge and Governor of the State of New York. The names 
and the period of ser^dce of those who have filled the dignified office 
of mayor since the city charter was granted, are as follows : 



1798.- 


— Joseph C. Yates. 


1855- 


1808.- 


—John Yates. 


1857- 


18 10.- 


—Abraham Oothout. 


1858. 


I8II.- 


—John Yates. 


1859. 


I8I3.- 


—Mans Schermerhorn. 


i860. 


I8I7.- 


—Henry Yates, Jr. 


1861. 


1825.- 


—Isaac M. Schermerhorn. 


1865. 


1826.- 


—David Boyd. 


1869. 


182.8.- 


—Isaac Schermerhorn. 


1871, 


I83I.- 


—Archibald L. Linn. 


1873- 


1832.- 


—John J. Degraff. 


1875. 


^837-- 


—Samuel W. Jones. 


1876. 


1839.- 


—Archibald L. Linn. 


1879.- 


1840.- 


—Alexander C. Gibson. 


1881. 


1842.- 


-John J. DeGraff. 


1883. 


1843.- 


—Alexander C. Gibson. 


1885. 


1845.- 


-John J. DeGraff. 


1887. 


1846.- 


—Peter Rowe. 


1889. 


1848.- 


—James E. Van Home. 


1891. 


1850.- 


-Peter Rowe. 


1893.- 


1851.- 


— Mordecai Myers. 


1898. 


1852.- 


-Abraham A. Van Vorst. 


1900. 


1853-- 


-Mordecai Myers. 


1902.- 



-Abel Smith. 
-Benjamin V. S. Vedder. 
-Alexander M. Vedder. 
-David P. Forest. 
-Benjamin F. Potter. 
-Arthur W. Hunter. 
-Andrew McMullen. 
-Abraham A. Van Vorst. 
-William J. Van Home. 
-Arthur W. Hunter. 
-Peter B. Yates. 
-William Howes Smith. 
-Joseph B. Graham. 
-Abraham A. Van Vorst. 
-John Young. 
-H. S. DeForest. 
-T. Low Barhydt. 
-H. S. DeForest. 
-Everett Smith. 
-Jacob W. Clute. 
-Charles C. Dur^^ee. 
-John H. White 
-Horace E. Van Voast. 



Princetown was formed March 20th, 1798, from a portion of the 
patents of Schenectady, which had been ceded to the Reform Dutch 



138 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Church of that city, and from lands originally patented to George 
Ingoldsby and Aaron Bradt in 1737, and subsequently sold to Wil- 
liam Corry, who formed a settlement there " which was long known 
as Corrysbush," who sold his interest to John Duncan. The town 
itself was named after John Prince, of Schenectady, who was then in 
the Assembly as a member from Albany County, and resided at 
Schenectady. 

Duanesburgh was erected as a township by patent March 13th, 
1765, but was first recognized as a town March 22d, 1788. It was 
named after the Hon. James Duane. Large tracts, in what is now 
this town, were purchased by different parties, to-wit : by Timothy 
Bagley in 1737, A. P. and William Crosby in 1738, Walter Butler in 
1739 and Jonathan Brewster in 1770. The tract embraced about 
60,000 acres, and of this whole tract Judge Duane became the pro- 
prietor, either by inheritance from his father or purchase, except 
1,000 acres known as Braine's patent ; but no active measures of 
settlement were taken until about the time of its organization in 
1765. During that year Judge Duane made a permanent settlement. 
The lands w^ere rented at the rate of fifteen dollars per annum on 
each one hundred acres on perpetual leases, payable in gold or silver. 



CHAPTER XII. 
The Close of the Century. 



Schenectady was not only bright with business but was socially 
brilliant. Ofhcers and men of the Revolution had returned from the 
war to the sweet peace of home in the quiet evening of the century. 
They were honored, feted and toasted as the old boys of the G. A. R. 
are now. They were carried in carriages at the close of the century 
in ever^' Fourth of July procession, and one by one the}^ dwindled 
away until the last survivor, Nicholas Veeder, a centenarian, will be 
remembered by man)' under half a century in age. 



CHANGE OF DRESS. 



139 



The aspect of the town changed rapidly. In architecture the 
gambrel roof of which some have survived the terrible fire of 1819, 
supplanted the old Holland peaked roof style. The city took on 
municipal airs and graces, Union College was founded, located in a 
building less than the size of the Classical, and planted on the 
corner where Mr. Howland Barney now lives. The style of dress 
was sobering down. The gorgeous colors, the silks and satins, laced 
wrist bands, gorgeously flowered vest and the gold trimmed cocked 
hat and clocked silk stocking gave way to more sombre hues. Still 
that grand traditional humbug, the " gentleman of the old school " 
was still a gorgeous sight in his wide-skirted, flaring tailed coat, his 
black cocked hat, silver-buckled shoes and stockings neatly tied with 
a ribbon at the knee. The powdered wig had just gone out, the 
hair was banged in front and tied with a queue. So grandly garbed 
the prosperous merchant, doctor, lawyer and divine strutted with a 
stately elegance at which one would smile in these practical days. 
With uplifted hat and teetering heels he would fire double-barrelled 
compliments at women in starched petticoats and balloon hoops, talk 
in Johnsonian stilted sentences, and swinging his gold-headed cane 
with which Sir William Blackstone had just said he might and did 
lawfully correct a wayward wife. A great sight Schenectady must 
have been in the babyhood of the cityhood. 

The great resorts were Hudson's tavern (Anthony Hall), Church's 
where now is the Myers Block and No, 7 State street, the old Bradt 
House, recently torn down by its owner, Mr. Lyon. The old and 
young beaux, the swells of that day, gathered mostly at Hudson's, 
and high rollers they were, those gentlemen of the old school. 

The. headquarters of politics, which ran high and were very bitter, 
was in the Ellice mansion and the little office on the corner of Gov- 
ernor's Lane. There Chief Justice Robert Yates and Joseph, his 
cousin, the future governor of New York, with kindred Democrats 
plotted and planned as now, running the political machine for this 
whole section of country. Thither came that wily Mephistopheles, 
who in the morning of the nineteenth century, shot Alexander 
Hamilton, the fascinating rascal at whose coming all our great 
grandmothers and grand aunts were sent up into the garret out of 



I40 ■ SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

harm's way, of whom in his old age, old ]\Iadam Jumel said that the 
clasp of his hand wonld thrill any woman, the wicked Aaron Burr. 

But there were others and an emigration that Schenectady did not 
covet. They settled on Albany Hill in the region where is now the 
East Avenue Presbyterian church, and eastward in the sand in which 
they burrowed like human coyotes. A dark, swarthy race, with 
straight hair, high cheek bones and copper complexion. They were 
called " Yanses," why none can positively say, but the generally 
adopted theory of their origin was undoubtedly the nearest to cor- 
rectness. Janse is Dutch for John's son. It was asserted that they 
were the descendants of the renowned Sir William, His Majesty 
George Ill's satrap, the great Mormon of the northern wilderness 
and his Indian wives. 

They were a violent contrast to the grand gentlemen of the city 
beneath. They burrowed in the earth, lived in sand caves, wove 
baskets and did odd jobs, any old thing for a living. There was no 
rose lane that led to their doorways, though there was an avenue 
there, not of " Araby the Blest," but of Stone Arabia, the squaw 
land up the Mohawk, from which they came. They bore, some of 
them, good old Dutch names, traces of their gypsy-like hue and fea- 
tures are recognizable to old inhabitants now and stand out in hair 
and complexion among some of our respectable and respected citi- 
zens. Let none have the heart or courage to call a man a " Yanse" 
now. The question was put by a venomous client into the mouth of 
an eminent lawyer from abroad and was, in his innocence addressed 
to a copper colored witness. "Are you a Janse ? " The county 
judge promptly called down the counsel and compelled him to apol- 
ogise. It was promptly done and well it was, for a pair of swarthy 
hands would have been at the lawyer's throat the moment he got 
into the street. 

The race is fading out into the white man's skin and the darkest 
brave died long ago. A couple of decades more and there will not 
be a trace of this Indian gypsy people. 

On the alluvial banks of the river, all was totally different. 
There was no sand to burrow in but the grandest soil for cultivation. 
It had been superb territory for corn, long before the footstep of the 



INCREASE OF POPULATION. 141 

coming citizen had placed its imprint upon it. The Mohawk farmer 
utilized it industriously and successfully, not only for the food pro. 
ducts of life, but established a broom making industry that in the 
coming century supplied almost all of the United States. Factories 
were built all around the outskirts of the city, Rotterdam and Glen- 
ville had scores of them. Large fortunes were made in the business. 
Most of the labor saving machinery was invented here. But we built 
the Erie Canal, giving the city a short and evanescent boom. Rail- 
roads gave freight facilities. The rapidly increasing population in 
the west, which, in after years with its marvelous soil that, " when you 
tickled it with a hoe it laughed with a thousand flowers," picked up 
the industry from the eastern emigrant. In the middle of the 19th 
century, the business was knocked out of sight. There is but little 
left of it. What there is, still demonstrates that Schenectady county 
makes the best brooms on earth. 

So in 1798, the young city soon came to be known as the 
"Ancient," by the reason of its early incorporation by the State and 
was born on a soil already replete with the solid basis of actual and 
thrilling history, with the charm of interesting tradition, with the 
reputation of its merchants for integrity and financial stability, un- 
surpassed in the young land. Fringed on the sandy east by the nar- 
row belt of the squalid " Janse," bordered on every point of the 
compass by the independent well-to-do, the honest and respected 
farmer, she left the village life and entered on a municipal career 
that was destined a hundred years later to change her name from the 
" Ancient " to the " Electric City " and to attract the attention and 
admiration of the scientific and inventive world. 



CHAPTER XIIL 

The First Semi-Centennial of the New City. 

Joseph C. Yates was the first mayor. He was the eldest son of 
Col. Stoeffel Yates of the colonial wars and of the Revolution, the 



142 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

assistant deputy quartermaster general under Philip Schuyler, and as 
the letters of the latter show, his warm personal friend. The Colo- 
nel was also, as appears from the documents left behind him. Pur- 
veyor General to the purse of the extravagant and reckless Arnold 
whom he evidently loved and admired until the day of his treason. 
General Fuller, who managed the family estates of his son, says that 
it was said of him, that aftef Arnold's treason, he never spoke his 
name and would turn away with e\'ident grief when it was men- 
tioned. 

A moment's digression will, it is hoped, be pardoned. It is taken 
now, as before, in these pages to do justice to a woman of the nobil- 
ity and character of Catharine Vrooman and other of the sturdy 
brave stock of the ]\Iohawk burghers. 

Stoeffel returned from the wars to become an importer. He had 
been a civil engineer. He had married Jane Bradt, daughter of 
Captain Andrease. It is of this plain Jane Bradt, the descendant of 
the half breed wife of Jacques Cornelise Van Slyck, this sketch is 
written to illustrate what force of character and self-reliant purpose 
can do. 

Stoeffel died in 1785, only forty-eight years of age. Jellis, his 
brother, a hard fighting young officer, who was living on the family 
plantation, was made executor and Jane, the widow, executrix of the 
Colonel's will. Jellis was a farmer, plain and simple. When he 
died, his brother was enlarging and rebuilding the house No. 28 
Front street, now owned by Mr. Richard Walton. He left a decent 
competence but a large family. Jellis insisted that four children, 
Joseph C, Henry, John B., and Andrew, should go to work at trades 
or back to the Glenville farm and the niggers. Jane Bradt insisted 
that the children should be educated and she was by long odds the 
best insistor. 

" Dey shall work," said the farmer in the Dutch dialect, " I am 
der axaceter." "Dey shall be eddicated," gave back the plucky 
widow in the same vernacular, " I am der axetrix." And she had 
her way, and a grand way it was. Joseph C, became Mayor, Sena- 
tor, Supreme Court Judge and Go\'ernor. Henr}', Senator from 
Albany county, dying worth $2,000,000, then the richest man in the 



ORDINANCE TO REPAIR. 143 

state according to the New York Sun. John B., Member of Con- 
gress from Madison connty and one of the bnilders of the Welland 
canal. Andrew, doctor of divinity and one of the first professors in 
Union college. On the tomb of Col. Christopher is a long and Inrid 
epitaph setting forth his service to king and country as soldier and 
statesman, showing that Schenectady had given the young soldier 
all she had to bestow. 

On the tablet over his widow is inscribed " Jane, consort of Col. 
Christopher Yates." Only this and little more. And yet all the 
name and fame that the four sons achieved was due to the magnifi- 
cent energy of the consort. 

Jane Bradt lived in a day when whatever women did they reaped 
small credit for. Tempora miitante ct nos miitamus. The grey 
mare these days is often the better horse and is recognized as such, 
especially when she is a widow. 

Yates was but thirty years of age when elected. His enemies then 
and afterwards declared he was dull of intellect and mulish in dispo- 
sition. His friends lauded him as the possessor of tons of horse 
sense. Probably a truthful description of him would land him 
somewhere about half way between the two extremes. That he was 
an upright judge and that his decisions are sound law and well and 
tersely written in the language of a graduated scholar is the best 
answer to the abuse which his independence of the political bosses 
subsequently drew down upon him. Anyway the city started well 
under his mayoralty. 

The first ordinance was to repair markets in Niskayuna, (Union 
street), where Mr. Walter S. Van Voast now resides, A committee 
was appointed to ascertain the title to the clock in the old Dutch 
church, the granting of a petition to publish the first newspaper in 
the city. The Schenectady Gazette and Mohawk Intelligence to be 
issued every Tuesday and Friday at ^3 per annum, of which one 
Thomas Stewart was editor, A law was passed suppressing improper 
assembling of slaves. 

In 1799 there were two fire companies, Nos, i and 2, twenty men 
in each, John Peek and John Glen the respective captains. 

The city was composed of the first and second wards. Night 



144 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



watchmen were appointed Nov. 24tli, 1798, at two dollars 
per night, to be allowed to each watch of four men. Corl and 
Andrew Rynex were appointed superintendents and to select their 
own subordinates. John Corl selected George Hoppole, Joseph Van 
de Bogart and Jacob Marselis. Andrew Rynex appointed William 
Rynex, Valentine Rynex and Andre\^ Rynex, Jr., thus keeping the 
police force all in the family. These men seem to be the first police- 
men of which we have official record. 

July 8th, 1799, the streets of the city were laid out and renamed. 
Front street, renamed Union street, changed from Niskayuna street, 
leading to Niskayuna Hill (College Hill). State street was changed 
from Albany street. Green street to Washington street, (avenue), 
Church street to Ferry street. Maiden Lane, its pretty name now 
changed to Centre street. College street and Jay street were the 
same as now. Fonda street seems to have been called Water street 
and Mill Uane was as now. Montgomery street, (Barrett) was opened 
in 1803. 

From two until four p. m., of December 24th, 1799, the bells of 
the city were tolled in memory of George Washington, and the 
mayor and aldermen wore crape for thirty days. 

On January 3d, 1801, the device of the city seal was adopted. It 
was a sheaf of wheat, the crest of which was taken by the mayor for 
his coat of arms. 

On March 30th, 1802, an ordinance for building the Albany 
turnpike was passed. The turnpike was thereafter laid out and 
established but it was not until almost 181 1 that it was stoned and 
graded as parts of it are yet. 

The following extract from the proceedings of the common coun- 
cil, August 8th, 1 81 2, reads very strangely: 

Wm. McClymon makes charges against the night watchmen, and 
a committee was appointed to investigate ; they were reprimanded 
and told their duty ; they had to wear badges and carry a staff at 
least five feet in length when on duty, going out two at a time. 
Their duties read as follows : That two of the said watchmen shall 
patrol the streets of that part of the city within the jurisdiction of 
the common council, and every hour with an audible voice call the 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS. 145 

hour of night at the intersection of one street with another ; in case 
of fire they shall alarm the citizens as they repair to the place of the 
fire ; they were commanded to arrest all slaves over twelve years of 
age who appeared on the streets after the hours set down to com- 
mence the watch, unless they had a lighted candle in a lantern or 
being with their master or mistress or having a pass in writing. 
Many of the older generation will remember that curfew rang at 
nine o'clock regularly, it being, for the latter years of the prevalence 
of the custom, sounded by the Methodist bell in Liberty street, and a 
loud sounding bell it was. It was a relic of the old slave days when 
the niggers were rung off the street up to a date within distinct rec- 
ollection. Every man of sixty can remember the old town crier who 
used to go about the street with a heavy hand bell and announce in 
a tremendous voice "boy lost," or any other great event worthy of 
public attention. 

The paving of the streets was first made from gravel from sur- 
rounding quarries ; Washington street was the first to be made so 
passable. Ferry street followed and both streets were put in order 
in 1804. Church, Union and Front streets followed. These were 
then business streets filled with shops of the merchants, great and 
small. Cobblestones followed. The material was obtained from the 
rifts in the river at the head of Frog alley. Washington avenue, 
Church street. Ferry, Union and State from Ferry west were paved 
in the early twenties before Lafayette came here. But as late as 
1845 State street was unpaved from the Vendome and eastward. 
Front, Green and Ferry had only cobblestone paved sidewalks when 
the cholera came in 1832. At the construction of the Albany turn- 
pike the Scotia dike was completed. 



CHAPTER XIV. 
The Bridge and Railroad. 



The old Mohawk bridge was built by the Mohawk and Hudson 
Turnpike Co. It was begun in 1806 and completed in 1809. The 



146 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

architect was Theodore, cousin of that gay and rascally Lothario, 
Vice President Aaron Burr. Theodore Burr was reputed to be the 
greatest bridge architect in America. David Hearsay was the 
builder. He was a mason by trade, lived by the bridge at the pres- 
ent residence of Ex-Judge Yates and with his eyes upon the work, 
day and night a magnificent job he made of it. When finished it 
was unsurpassed in beauty and solidity by any structure in America. 
It was erected on three massive piers whose greater size readily dis- 
tinguished them from the others put in in 1835 — an architectural 
blunder. It was really the first approach ever made to a suspension 
bridge. It was nine hundred feet in length in three lofty and mag- 
nificent spans, each of three hundred feet, made of two inch timbers 
of Norway pine. These spans were shingled to keep them from the 
weather. They were of enormous size, four feet thick by three 
broad. Had the great architect lived, this, his masterpiece, would be 
standing to-day. But it began to sag, the uprights rotted and on the 
dissolution of the M. & H. Turnpike Co., it was sold to capitalists 
whose misplaced economy neglected that watchful repairing so neces- 
sary to a wooden structure of this size, so that the uprights and 
interior timbers rotted. Meanwhile it had apparently sagged ; four 
more piers were built under it, destroying plan and principle of 
structure so that the old bridge became a succession of hills and 
valleys. It had been covered over with a barn-like unpainted cover- 
ing of rough hemlock boards, which, becoming weather beaten from 
the total absence of paint, made it in its old days a ghostly, ghastly 
tunnel over the river — it could only be described as spooky. Menag- 
erie elephants sometimes would not cross, and on one occasion in the 
early sixties, the whole town watched with delight while the ele- 
phants who refused to cross, sported with glee in the warm current 
on a hot summer day and had to be driven across by the steel hooks 
of the keepers. 

Meanwhile, David Hearsay living beside it, was the bridge keeper 
and guarded the creation of Burr's genius and his own handiwork 
with "a heathen veneration. With him, ifor half a century, was old 
Christopher Beekmari, better known as " Uncle Stoeffel," the 
friend and father of the Delta Phis of Old Union — after them the 



THE OLD BRIDGE. 147 

pater-faniilias to every under-gradiiate. Uncle Stoeffel knew many 
great men in their youth and many of the renowned of the land 
came to see him at commencement time. He was a quaint old Ger- 
man with laughable lapses of English, with a remarkably well 
educated cat as his inseparable companion. He was an ideal toll- 
taker. The cavernous old structure, as might well be imagined, was 
invested and infested at night by all the dissolute and disreputable 
vagabonds of both sexes in the city. He lived in the ramshackle 
old toll-house on the spot where the present structure stands, kept it 
scrupulously clean, slept with an eye and an ear always open. The 
ruffian whoever and however desperate he was, who persistently 
refused his toll or used a threatening word or movement, went down 
like a stricken ox under the hickory club always within reach. A 
strange old character, simple as a child, an old confiding Dutch baby, 
loving the boys, upon whom the ingrates were always playing tricks. 
And they owed him much and owed it often. When the wayward 
undergraduate emerged from a " skate " with swelled head and 
leaden stomach and a copperas palate and could not get relief, he 
would stagger down to the old toll house for the cure that Uncle 
Stoeffel knew how and was ready to give any time of the day or 
night. Uncle was a devout Methodist according to his lights. He 
would stand the victim of youthful ebullition in the center of the 
floor clad in the " altogether " and give him a tremendous bath on 
the clean boards, stuffing him with sour condiments of his own con- 
coction, accompanied by religious admonition throughout, a strange 
mixture of piety and pickles, of pails of water, the Pentateuch and 
the Psalms of David. 

Between David Hearsay, a calm, dignified gentleman, and the pep- 
pery German, there was always a bickering warfare, though no 
doubt their friendship born of close comradeship of fifty years was 
deep and sincere. Hearsay was a rigid Episcopalian, Stoeffel a 
decided dissenter. Hearsay abhorred tobacco, Uncle with his tobacco 
pipe all day long. When the two old men, very nearly of an age, 
and that age was about eighty. Hearsay was continually warning 
Stoeffel that his excessive smoking would bring him to an early 
grave, Stoeffel's answer was only a more vigorous puff. 



148 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Hearsay died leaving a decent competence for his widow. Uncle 
went where he never should have gone — to the poorhouse. Long 
after Hearsay's death, he met an old resident and greeted him. " So 
Hearsay saice de smoke would dry me ub ? Vere is Hearsay now, 
taging doll some vere else. My bibe and I is here." 

Heim Stoeffel, let us hope that when long ago St. Peter met you 
at the gate, he recognized his earthly fellow craftsman and in pater- 
nal spirit swung wide open the pearly portal without a creak in its 
jeweled hinges. 

Every time an unusually strong spring freshet came roaring down, 
the town used to gather at its abutments to see it carried away. But 
icebergs and glaciers crumbled year after year against it. 

In 1866 a great canal boat lifted by the torrent out of the big ditch 
into the river came down heralded by the telegraph. The city 
rushed to witness the final demolition of the unsightly row of old 
barns and shanties. The boat came down in the full sway of the 
current on the Glenville side, struck the bridge with the impact of a 
clap of thunder, and halted one instant. There was a crash of tim- 
bers — it was not the bridge. The massive bull-head boat crumbled, 
turned tail up in defeat, and bowing its head to the genius of Burr 
and the workmanship of Hearsay emerged a crumbling mass on the 
eastern side. 

But the old bridge had to go. Glenville had bought it. District 
Attorney Fahn took the matter in hand, caused it to be indicted as a 
public nuisance. It was found guilty and ordered abated. Glen- 
ville, August 8th, 1873, as appears from a receipt kindly loaned by 
Mr. Charles P. Sanders, son of the Charles P. Sanders who is men- 
tioned therein, then Supervisor of the town of Glenville, purchased 
the bridge and its equipments in behalf of said town, from William 
Van Vranken, as treasurer of the Mohawk Bridge Company, paying 
therefor $12,000 on behalf of the town and $600 made up by pri- 
vate subscription. The wooden structure was sold at auction in 
parcels and brought about $500. 

It was cut up for matches and the new iron structure took its place 
in 1874. While in process of demolition, after the covering was 
ripped off, it returned in its last hours to the beauty of its youth. 



WAR OF 1812. 149 

The superb arches and the graceful curves of the original structure 
were revealed. It disappeared, as it was created, a thing of beauty, 
and, as many competent bridge builders said, under proper care and 
management, still a thing of long life and strength. 

And now another war breaks out between England and America 
in which Schenectady had not the slightest interest or concern. The 
old mother country had been impressing seamen on board American 
vessels on the high seas and claiming the right of search. But with 
a strange oversight, William Pitt had neglected to overhaul the 
Durham boats and Schenectady had no other seamen. The great 
prime minister would have found grand material in the sturdy navi- 
gators of the river, but in the press of business he let the grand chance 
go by and the big flat bottoms were poled and sailed along, bearing 
produce to the west and bringing down the agonizing cobblestones 
for paveriient to bruise and batter their fellow citizens and their 
children for nearly a century without let or hindrance or the cruel 
grasp of the British oppressor. 

But the city did its share all the same. She had, as appears, but 
one independent company at the time, commanded by Jonas Holland, 
the ancestor of Alexander Holland, formerly treasurer of Union 
college. He was a major under General Scott and raised a company 
in Schenectady that participated in this war. Nicholas Van Slyck, 
grandfather of the late Christopher Van Slyck, was conspicuous in 
military circles at this time. From all the records, none of which 
are now in the adjutant g'^neral's office in Albany, being all in the 
war department of the United States, there were several officers and 
men from Schenectady who did splendid fighting in that war. Col. 
John B. Yates, the son of Christopher Yates, captain of a troop of 
horse under Wade Hampton, won great renown on the Canadian 
border. But probably the grandest fighter that went from Schenec- 
tady in that war will be remembered by many of us. The late Hon. 
Keyes Paige, brother of the distinguished Alonzo W. Paige, justice 
of the Supreme Court, and father of Ex-Postmaster Paige, who bears 
his name, of the Misses Clara C, and Fanny C. Paige of Washing- 
ton avenue, of the late Joseph C. Y. Paige, formerly city charriber- 



I50 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

lain of Albany, graduated at Williams college, 1807, was appointed 
cadet in the United States army, 1808, lieutenant, 1812, captain, 1813, 
of United States infantry, colonel of militia, 1817, admitted attorney 
at law, 1810, district attorney, 1818, clerk of Supreme Court, 1823 
and regent of the University of New York, 1829. ^^ resided 
for several years in Albany, of which city he was mayor, but returned 
to Schenectady, where he died December loth, 1857, being sixty- 
nine years of age. Paige was a gallant and distinguished soldier, 
especially noted not only for his bravery but for the devotion of his 
men. He fought all along the Canadian border, was the trusted and 
honored subaltern of Van Rensselaer and was an interesting charac- 
ter in Schenectady, where he returned to pass his old age and where 
he died not many years ago. 

Robert H. Wendell, well remembered yet as Harry Wendell, own- 
ing Wendell quarry, was a captain in 1812 and 1814, and fought all 
through the war. 

But the quaintest old character that ever came out of that war was 
Hugh Riddle, grandfather of William H. Hathaway, the leading 
liveryman of this city. He returned from service full of wonderful 
stories, an independent, fearless and altogether too reckless, old man. 
His remarkable escapes and adventures created considerable scepti- 
cism among his friends, and his stories were laughed at. But in 
1852, General Scott, on his political campaign for the presidency, 
passed through Schenectady in all the glory of his "fuss and feathers" 
a magnificent looking figure. As he appeared upon the platform in 
the midst of the Whigs, whose pet he was, he saw in the multitude 
the tall rugged form and seared face of Hugh Riddle. Perhaps from 
real enjoyment of memory, more likely from that spirit of demagog- 
ism which was the alloy of his splendid character, he shouted out : 
" Is that you, Hugh Riddle ? " Hugh had been telling the story of 
his having been taken prisoner and having been rowed away in a 
boat, and of his captors getting drunk and of his taking possession 
of their guns and waking them up with the statement that he would 
shoot the first man who disobeyed, and made them row him back to 
the American shore, so when Scott, in his great voice roared out : 
" Have you seen the men in the boat yet ? " the old man's triumph 



ROUTE OF CANAL. 151 

was complete. Thereafter for weeks the town was not big enough, 
for him and his hat did not fit him. 

Captain Hugh Robinson, connected with all the old families by 
birth and consanguinity, was also an officer of high repute in that 
war ; an old bachelor, whose headquarters was Carley's store and 
whose reminiscenses were delightful. 

A widow or two still lives and draws pension, we believe, but of 
course all who remember anything about that war have long since 
gone, and the records are very sparse. 

Of Robert Yates we have written in the stories of the early settlers. 

The War of 181 2, so far as business is concerned, was a beneficence 
to Schenectady. All the troops going to the frontier passed this way. 
The channel of the Mohawk was very different, much broader and 
deeper by far. General Scott encamped with two regiments of 
infantry west of the Mohawk bridge under the hotel now situated 
there, at its Glenville terminus. 

The route of the Erie canal as originally laid out, was along the 
Bennekill, Frog Alley river, to meet the convenience of the great 
forwarders and mercantile houses along that street. But the fire of 
1819 made terrible havoc through all that section of the city. The 
retail business houses were generally destroyed. Still it probably 
would have taken that route but for the determined efforts of Resolve 
Givens, the proprietor of the hotel which for over sixty years bore 
his name, and which, in exterior looking no better than a country 
tavern, was one of the best kept hostelries in the state. Its table 
was always admirable, even to the time of its destruction to make 
way for the present imposing and elegant Edison. 

Schenectady was an important point on the canal. Here was a 
basin 800 feet long by 200 feet broad where transhipment was made, 
first from the Mohawk and Hudson Turnpike and afterwards from 
the Mohawk and Hudson Railway Company. Its heavy walls are 
still traceable at the old northerly boundaries under the mica shop, 
and its southerly limit can be discovered in some heavy masonry 
opposite the Westinghouse works. Freight transportation at this 
time was immense. At the opening of the canal in 1825, DeWitt 



152 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Clinton, the father of the big " ditch," as they called it, rode through 
here on a boat with bands of music and grand display. 

The three military companies of the city then in existence, a bat- 
tery of heavy artillery, commanded by John Benson, captain, and 
Thomas Hannah and David Reese, junior officers ; a rifle company 
commanded by Nicholas Barhydt as its last captain, and our honor- 
able citizen, Andrew J. Barhydt, still living, the lieutenant in the 
company, and a company called the " Braves," commanded by Clems, 
led the procession. Governor Yates, with other distinguished citi- 
zens, rode in carriages. It was a great day for Schenectady. 

But when the Mohawk and Hudson R. R., was completed, it built 
a large freight depot just north of the northerly end of the present 
basin and transported its own freight, and after a while the old basin 
fell into disuse and was abandoned. But it was a tremendously 
busy place, full of boats, wedged in as sardines in a box, in its day. 

In 1826 Lafayette visited in Schenectady. He stayed but a day, 
coming in the morning and going away in the evening. He was given 
a tremendous ovation, met by the military and by eminent citizens in 
carriages. He was conducted to the then Court House, afterwards 
replaced by West college, in turn replaced by the Union school 
building. A platform was erected in front of the centre of the Court 
House and the people thronged to shake hands with him. 

Joseph Yates had been the first mayor of Schenectady, and in 1806 
and 1807 was a member of the United States Senate from the east- 
ern district, and one of the members of a commission, appointed 
member of the legislature of the state to meet and confer in behalf 
of the interest of New York and New Jersey to certain claims of 
jurisdiction and territory, winning great distinction for the ability 
with which he discharged his responsibility. In 1808 he was again 
elected Senator, but after his election, Brocholst Livingstone, then a 
Justice of the Supreme Court of the State, was promoted to the 
bench of the United States Supreme Court and Yates was appointed 
in his place. He was an excellent judge, one of the best the state 
ever had. In November, 1822, he was elected by an enormous 
majority over Solomon South wick, his opponent. It was said of him 
by those whom his fearless action and resolute purpose had made his 



A SINCERE GOVERNOR. 153 

enemies, that he went into office and out of office the most unani- 
mously of any governor of the state up to his time. Without bur- 
dening the narrative with the political battles of that day, it is well 
known history that many of his party became alienated from him. 
He would not obey the machine, and there were machines then as 
now, very grinding machines they were to a man of the Governor's 
sturdy independence. That he alienated himself from his party, 
gave him not the slightest concern. He went straight onward in 
what he believed to be the way of rectitude, and, whether mistaken 
or not, his perfect sincerity of purpose proved that he acted only 
from unconquerable strength of his conviction. Stories sometimes 
humorous and sometimes bitter, all of them false, were published 
about him in a day when calumny in politics was worse than now. 

In the governor's room in the city hall. New York, his picture is 
that of a man of distinguished, imposing and very noble person, as 
fine a representative of a gentleman of the old school in appearance, 
as any upon its walls. 

He may have suffered much from contact with his brilliant though 
somewhat erratic family connection with the versatile John Van 
Ness, who was an illustration of the adage " wit and judgment are 
rarely allied." Governor Yates rarely essayed wit, was not perhaps 
a dispenser of humor, but that he was a man of solid judgment and 
great judicial ability, the common law reports of the State of New 
York abundantly show. He was truly beloved and greatly mourned 
in Schenectady, which gives to this distinguished statesman, as it did 
to his soldier and statesman fathers, all it has in its power to bestow. 
His only descendants now residing in Schenectady are John Delancy 
Watkins, his great grandson and his nephew of the same name, a 
great, great grandson. 



154 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

CHAPTER XV. 
The Great Fire of 1819. 

Another calamity was destined to fall upon Schenectady. One 
often hears of " The Great Fire of 1819." No reliable records of it 
appear in any history of the city, nor can any such be obtained. We 
have to depend upon surviving eye-witnesses, and secure such infor- 
mation as we can from the minutes of the Common Council and files 
of old newspapers. 

On the Common Council Journal of Nov. i6th and 17th, occurs 
this minute : 

" Nov. i6th. — The market corner Union and College streets to be 
repaired at the cost of the occupants therein. 

Nov. 16 and 17 — A great fire has raged in this city for two days ; 
all the western part of the city is burned ; hundreds of citizens ren- 
dered homeless. Sixteen watchmen put out each night in the city 
and paid $1 per night to watch after the great fire." 

In the Schenectady Cabhiet of Nov. 24th, 18 19, is the following 
record of the awful conflagration : 

Schenectady, Nov. 24th, 1819. 
Destructive Fire — On Wednesday morning last, between the 
hours of four and five, a fire broke out in this city, the most destruc- 
tive we have ever witnessed. It originated in Mr. Haight's currying 
shop in Water street, and communicated from thence to Mr. 
Moyston's dwelling house and store, which stood on the opposite 
side of the same street. These, with some of the adjoining build- 
ings, were soon reduced to ashes. A strong southeast wind fed the 
fury of the raging element, so that it could not be arrested until it 
had crossed State street, and swept away, in its desolating course, 
almost every building between that street and the Mohawk Bridge 
which, having been on fire in several places, was with difficulty 
saved. Thus, in about the space of six hours, the western part of 



AFTER THE FIRE. 155 

our city exhibited a melancholy scene of devastation and ruin. The 
cellars of the buildings consumed continued to smoke and burn for 
several days following. From the fortunate circumstance of the 
wind continuing to blow in one direction, the ruin was not so far 
spread as it otherwise would have been, and owing to this, and the 
unremitting exertions of some individuals, the buildings on the west 
side of Church street with two or three exceptions, were not mater- 
ially injured. Many persons were much injured and bruised while 
lending their aid to save the furniture, etc., of the unhappy sufferers. 
The number of buildings destroyed, including barns and outhouses 
is about one hundred and sixty, of which at least ninety are dwelling 
houses, stores and offices, as may be seen by the subjoined statement. 
Besides the buildings, (not more than seven of which were insured) 
we have to lament the loss of much valuable property, such as fruit 
trees, furniture, etc., and a great quantity of grain and provisions, 
and the tale will scarcely be half told, when we add that not a few 
have been literally burnt out of their homes and cast, without shel- 
ter or the means of subsistence, at this inclement season of the year, 
upon the charity and protection of their friends ; yea, some have lost 
their all. No correct estimate of the loss can be formed, but we 
shall not exceed the bounds of truth if we say it is somewhere near 
$150,000. 

The indefatigable labor of all, but more particularly of strangers 
and of the students of Union College, in rescuing property from the 
devouring flames, merits the warmest thanks. 

Amid the sincerest feeling of regret, we rejoice, and we do it with 
emotion of gratitude to the Supreme Disposer of events that, during 
this awful visitation of His providence, no lives have been lost. We 
also feel great satisfaction in stating that the corporation of this city 
is pursuing measures for the relief of the sufferers. 

The following is a list, as correct as could be ascertained, of the 
buildings consumed, and of the persons by whom they were owned 
or occupied, to-wit : 

In Water Street — A building occupied by Isaac Haight as a currier's 
shop, and owned by Nathan Garnsey, Jr. Five houses and a store 
owned by John Brown and occupied by A. R. Murford, B. and I. 



156 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Vrooman, M. Crane and Waster, and I. Sheffield, B. Miller and the 
Misses McClure and Currey ; a dwelling house occupied by P. Murray 
and owned by John S. Vrooman ; a barn occupied and owned by 
John Brown. 

II In State Street — John H. Moyston's dwelling house, store and 
barn ; John S. Vrooman's brick dwelling house ; a large brick dwell- 
ing house, store and shop of John Brown ; a store of William Lyman ; 
a large brick dwelling house, store, barn and outhouses of D, & H, 
R. Martin ; I. DeGraff, Esqr's dwelling house, barn and outhouses ; 
a barn occupied by J. Wasson and owned by the heirs of James Brad- 
shaw, deceased. 

In Church Street — John Prouty's frame dwelling house, office and 
outhouses ; a barn occupied by Mrs. Vredenburgh and owned by the 
heirs of Dr. C. Vrooman ; the Schenectady Female Academy, owned 
by Joseph Horsfall ; a barn belonging to the widow Elizabeth Vroo- 
man, and one belonging to M. T. E. Veeder, Esq. 

In Union Street — A dwelling house occupied by Milo Smith and 
owned by widow Nancy Beekman ; a dwelling house occupied by 
Mr. Petit and owned by widow Cathaline DeGraff ; a spacious build- 
ing occupied by E. DeVendel as a dwelling house and boarding 
school, with a barn and outhouses, owned by Mr. M. Vicar ; a store 
occupied by Wm. B. Walton & Co., a brick dwelling house and barn 
occupied by Dr. Isaac Schermerhorn, all owned by Wm. Girvan, Esq.; 
widow Mary Teller's dwelling house and barn ; the Mohawk Turn- 
pike Co's office, the law office of N. F. Beck, Esq., DeGraff, Walton 
& Co's store and outhouses on the corner of Union and Washington 
streets, all owned by Wm. Girvan, Esq. 

In Washington Street — The dwelling house, store and barn of 
Cornelius Z. Van Santvoord ; a store occupied by Henry Topping 
and owned by the widow F. Veeder ; two offices occupied by Henry 
V. Fonda, Esq., and by Vrooman & Schermerhorn, and owned by 
them ; the dwelling house of the widow F. Veeder, a blacksmith 
shop owned by her and occupied by Jacob S. Vrooman ; the tavern 
of Richard Freeman ; the dwelling house and County Clerk's office 
of Jellis A. Fonda ; the dwelling house of the widow Nancy Beek- 
man ; a dwelling house and barn of Stephen Lush, occupied by J. 



BUILDINGS BURNED. 



^57 



McMichael for a dwelling- and Richard McMichael & Co., as a store ; 
a shop occupied by Giles Clute as a shoe store and owned by Stephen 
Lnsh ; Eri Lusher's elegant brick dwelling house, store and barn ; 
a dwelling house occupied by Mr. Hicks and Mrs. Stevens, owned 
by Eri Lusher ; the dwelling house, store and barn of James I. Car- 
ley ; the large dwelling house, shop and barn, unoccupied, owned 
by Jacob S. Glen ; a building occupied by Toll & Brooks as a store 
and by Seth Thayer and R. C. Jackson as a dwelling house, occupied 
by Mrs. Sophia Willard, David Allen and Mrs. Wiley, owned by the 
heirs of John Fisher, deceased ; a dwelling house, store, barn and 
several outhouses occupied by Mrs. Peek and J. B. Van Eps ; a dwell- 
ing house and store occupied by Josiah Stiles, owned by J. B. Van 
Eps ; David Hearsay's dwelling house, shop, barn and outhouses ; 
a store occupied by Kennedy Farrell, owned by D. Hearsay ; the 
dwelling house and barn of George Cooper ; the brick dwelling 
house, store and barn owned by Joseph C. Yates, formerly by Robert 
Loague ; the dwelling house and store occupied by Samuel Lee, 
owned by the widow E. Prince ; the dwelling house, store, barn and 
outhouses of Gen. A. Oothout ; Giles Clute's tavern and barn ; the 
dwelling house occupied by Alexander Van Eps, E. Townsend and 
G. Van Valkenburgh, owned by widow Bradt ; the house and barn 
of J. V. Ryley, Esq. 

Corner of Washington and Front Streets — Andrew N. Van Pat- 
ten's tavern, store, barn and sheds ; M. Van Guysling's store. 

In Front Street — The bakery of Mrs. Gill ; a dwelling house occu- 
pied by Tobias V. Cuyler, owned by A. N. Van Patten ; Dr. D. I. Toll's 
dwelling house ; a dwelling house of A. N. Van Patten, unoccupied- 
the dwelling house and barn occupied by John S. Ten Eyck, owned 
by Frederick Van Patten ; a store occupied by Mrs. Hart as a dwell- 
ing house and a barn owned by Joseph C. Yates, Esq. ; a dwelling 
house, store, barn and tannery occupied by Henry E. Telter, owned 
by Charles Kane, Esq. ; a dwelling house and outhouses occupied by 
the widow Van Ingen, owned by Gershom Van Vorst ; a dwelling 
house and outhouses owned and occupied by widow Elizabeth Prince. 

The above account of the sufferers was furnished by a committee 
appointed for that purpose, and we believe it to be generally correct. 



J58 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The subscriber having witnessed the great exertions of the citizens 
of this city, and the students of Union College, in the late distress- 
ing fire, cannot refrain from expressing his thanks for the assistance 
they rendered in subduing the devouring element ; particularly those 
whose personal and manly exertions, rescued his property from the 
flames. He knows the names of only a few. He regrets that he 
cannot particularize them so as to thank them in person. — Nov. 17th, 
1819. 

John Sanders. 

A. G. Fonda acknowledges with gratitude the spirited exertions of 
his friends and fellow citizens, and particularly of the students of 
Union College, in saving his property from fire on Wednesday morn- 
ing last. — Nov. 22. 

David Tomlinson offers his gratitude to his friends, fellow citizens, 
officers and students of Union College, for their kind exertions, 
through Divine Providence, in saving his buildings and other prop- 
erty from fire yesterday morning. — Nov. i8th, 1819. 

B, M. Mumford tenders his most grateful acknolwedgments to the 
citizens of Schenectady generally, and to the students of Union Col- 
lege in particular, for their indefatigable exertions in saving his 
property from destruction during the late awful and calamitous fire in 
this city. — Nov. 22. 

D. & H. R. Martin offer their grateful thanks to those who aided 
them during the distressing conflagration on the 17th, and whose 
exertions saved a great portion of their effects from the flames. — 
Nov. 22. 

Samuel Lee tenders his thanks to his fellow-citizens, particularly 
to his friends in the fourth ward, for their unwearied exertions in 
saving his property from the devouring flames on Wednesday last. — 
Nov. 22. 

William Lyman respectfully tenders his most grateful acknowl- 
edgments to his fellow-citizens, and his friends from the adjacent 
towns, for their unwearied exertions in saving his property from 
destruction by the late fire. — Nov. 22. 

Mrs. Margaret Suter takes this method to return her thanks to her 



APPEAL FOR ASSISTANCE. 159 

friends for the preservation of her property during the late fire. — 
Nov. 22. 

Abraham Van Eps tenders his grateful acknowledgments to his 
fellow citizens, and the students of Union College, for their spirited 
exertions in saving his property from the devouring flames on 
Wednesday morning last. — Nov. 22. 

Since the late fire in Schenectady, one of the proprietors of this 
paper has visited that city, and inspected the ruins. They present a 
most melancholy and awful scene of ruin and desolation ; and the 
personal distress of many of the sufferers is great beyond descrip- 
tion. Widows and orphan children, and many others, who were in 
the possession of respectable property, and in the enjoyment of most 
of the comforts and conveniences of life, are reduced to wretched- 
ness, to penury and want, and their forlorn situation at the present 
season, makes an irresistible appeal to the sympathy, the benevolence 
and the charity of their fellow citizens. It is an appeal made to one 
of the noblest faculties of the human mind, and cannot and will not 
be made in vain. This city has often drank deep of the cup of 
affliction which their fellow citizens of Schenectady are now called 
to partake of, and they know well how to commisserate their situa- 
tion and to minister to their necessities." 

It is impossible, without the work of months in the County 
Clerk's office, to point out to-day the location of the various houses 
which are burnt, but the following certainly were saved : the resi- 
dence of John Sanders, now occupied by Ex-District Attorney Daniel 
Naylon. The residence of Dr. Alexander G. Fonda, which was 
taken down at the time the new county building was erected on 
Union street ; the residence of Benjamin Mumford on Washington 
street, now believed to be in the ownership of the Hon. Edward W. 
Paige ; so also, was the house now owned in the Swartfigure family, 
and of historic interest as belonging in old days to Jacob Glen, and 
as having been the house where Washington stayed during his visit 
in Schenectady. The residence of Ex-Judge Yates was spared. So 
it seems, were about all the great storage and forwarding houses 
along the bank of the river, for the Yates' and Mynderse, DeGraff, 
Walton & Co., were standing fifty years ago. 



i6o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

There were but three fire companies in the town, as appears from 
the common council record, and the appliances were utterly ineffi- 
cient to meet the emergency. Everybody in those days was supplied 
with leather fire buckets, many of which are still in possession of 
the old families as mementoes of that day. 

The city was then divided into fire districts, and each householder 
had these leather buckets, then called leather bags. On heretofore 
occasions, every man owning these buckets was requested at the 
head of the fire company in his district, and had to go into service. 
In case of his obstinance he was fined heavily. Companies i, 2 and 
3, and the fire bag people, were all that could meet the impending 
day. To the honor of the old Union be it said, that the students of 
the college turned out iinasked and fought for two days with the fire 
raging, winning the gratitude of the citizens. Union then had a fire 
engine of its own, an old cart shaped thing on two wheels and with 
levers that were perpendicular to the pole of the carriage, and that 
did brave work, the students pumping at it day and night. 

The homeless and houseless people, two hundred families and more, 
suffered terribly. It is difficult to locate the buildings described in 
the article of the Cabinet. This is about the best account of the fire 
that can be obtained. There are but two or three people in Schenec- 
tady who were living then, and they were mere children. The 
cause of the origin of the fire appears in a later issue of the paper. 
As it contains many facts, and is such valuable information, that, 
though published at that early day, when so much had not been 
learned as we know now, this paper still contains so many facts and 
suggestions, and is written with so much intelligence and knowledge 
of the subject, that it makes it very valuable to us, even in this cen- 
tury of tremendous advance in experience and knowledge. Extracts 
from this article are therefore quoted. 

" Spontaneous Combustion. — The late dreadful fire in this city 
will, we trust, continue to excite the commiseration of the benevo- 
lent in favor of the unfortunate sufferers. Such a calamity addresses 
itself to every charitable feeling of the heart, and calls loudly for the 
exercise of that Christian charity, which is always ready to supply 
the wants and to cheer the woe of the afflicted. 



PROBABLE CAUSE OF FIRE. i6i 

But our attention ought to be directed to an examination of tlie 
cause of this disaster. A knowledge of this may enable us to guard 
against future danger, and to prevent a recurrence of a similar 
calamity. 

The facts, as we have received them from Mr. Haight, in whose 
shop the fire originated, and in whose statements we place entire con- 
fidence, are these : According to his usual practice, he transferred 
his business from the shop where the fire commenced, at about six 
o'clock of the evening previous, to another shop that he also occu- 
pied ; that no fire or candle had been in the shop after that time ; 
that at nine o'clock of the same evening, he visited the shop and 
found everything in safety. The next morning as he was about to 
commence his labor for the day, he discovered three out of four rooms 
on fire in the inside, and that there was no appearance of fire on the 
outside of the building. Mr. H., further states, that there was in the 
building a quantity of corn in the ear, a number of hides untanned 
and undressed, and a quantity of oil ; that in one of the rooms there 
were a number of skins of leather which had been oiled and hung 
up during the day ; that the oil used was liver oil and oil expressed 
from the feet of cattle, called by him neats foot oil ; there was also 
in one of the rooms a large quantity of slacked lime. Mr. H. men- 
tions that it had been perfectly slacked some time before, and that no 
water was, or had been near it. 

It is a well known fact that oil is highly combustible ; it is not, 
however, as extensively known, that oil spread upon any animal or 
vegetable substance, will produce spontaneous combustion. The 
case of the storehouse of sails at Brest, establishes the fact, that such 
may be its effect. There are also many other cases, for which we refer 
to the work already quoted ; it is therefore possible that the oil which 
was constantly used in the shop of Mr. H., may accidentally have 
been spilled on some animal or vegetable substance and produced the 
combustion ; at all events, the fire may have commenced from the 
oiled skins which were in the shop. In confirmation of this, we 
would merely state that the spontaneous inflammation of essential 
or volatile oils and that of some fat oils, particularly when mixed 
with nitrous acid, is well known. 



i62 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

But there are other facts to which attention should be paid, and 
a knowledo^e of which is highly important to the community. Corn 
heaped up has sometimes produced inflammation, as also hay laid up 
damp. Nor is this a discovery of our day. Vanieri, an Italian who 
flourished in the seventeenth century, adverts to this circumstance 
as well known and established. These inflammations always take 
place when the matter heaped up preserves a certain degree of humid- 
ity, which is necessary to excite a fermentation ; it is in this way 
that a member of the Imperial Academy of Sciences at St. Peters- 
burg, in giving a detail of the circumstances which attended a fire 
in a Russian frigate in April, 1781, caused by a bundle of matting 
containing Russian lamp black, prepared from fir soot, moistened 
with hemp oil varnish, says: ' The spontaneous accession of various 
matters from the vegetable kingdom, as wet hay, corn and madder, 
and at times wet meal and malt, are well known.' We close with 
one more authority, Bartholdi, a celebrated French chemist, in an 
account of spontaneous inflammation, enumerates ten causes, two of 
which are the following : ' The fermentation of animal and vegetable 
substances, heaped up in a large mass, which are either too dry or 
too moist, as hay, dung, «Slc.' ' The accumulation of wool, cotton 
and other animal and vegetable substances, covered with an oily 
matter and particularly a drying oil.' " 

" Under each of these, he produces instances to confirm his asser- 
tions. The animal and vegetable substances, if heaped upon each 
other, while they retain their moisture, enter into fermentation, a 
change is effected in their composition, and they often become so 
much heated as to inflame ; they are thus decomposed, and in conse- 
quence, heat is produced." 

" It may be impertinent here to add, that the oils which Mr. 
H. mentions were of the kind called fixed oils, those obtained 
partly from animals and partly from vegetables, by simple expres- 
sions. Of the fixed oils, those which remain transparent, after they 
become solid from exposure to the action of the air, are called drying 
oils ; those that become opaque are called fat oils." 

" There is one more circumstance to which we would call the 
attention of the public. Wool stuff and pieces of cloth which were 



A MATTER OF CAUTION. 163 

not scoured, have taken fire when folded up and even during the 
time of their conveyance from one place to another, when heaped 
upon each other. Wool when neither wet or oiled, if piled up, has 
frequently been known to inflame spontaneously." 

" These facts we have thought proper to present to the public. 
Whether the fire in this city originated in this way, we leave to the 
decision of those more competent than ourselves to determine on a 
scientific question of this kind. For their benefit we have given Mr. 
H's statement at length. We only say it appears highly proba- 
ble. At all events, it is important that the community should be 
apprised of the existence of instances of such a nature. It will not 
only tend to increase the vigilance of individuals, and awaken their 
attention to objects which have hitherto been neglected ; but, to say 
the least, it may frequently prevent unjust and illiberal insinuations. 
The reputation of the innocent man may thus be assailed by 
calumny, and his peace destroyed by unmerited suspicion." 



CHAPTER XVI. 
The Railroads. 



Schenectady is the pioneer of the world in railroad traffic, as she 
is now its leader in the more marvelous, apparently the conquering 
science of electricity. 

On the 29th of July, 1830, the ceremony of breaking ground for 
the Mohawk and Hudson Railroad took place near Schenectady, 
with a silver spade by Stephen Van Rensselaer. - In September it 
was announced the stock had risen ten per cent., and the editor of 
the Albany Advertiser predicted that trains would run from Albany 
to Schenectady in three-quarters of an hour, and reach Utica from 
Albany in four hours. The latter was a somewhat startling predic- 
tion at this time, when we consider that the utmost exertions of the 
stages barely overcame the distance in twelve hours. 



i64 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

By the 25th of July, 1831, twelve months from the time when the 
ceremony of breaking ground was performed, the road was com- 
pleted from the junction of the western turnpike and Lydius street, 
Albany, to the brow of the hill at Schenectady, a distance of twelve 
and a half miles. Some defects in the first locomotive used, called 
the DeWitt Clinton, prevented a trial before the 3d of August. On 
this day a trip was made in one hour and forty-five minutes, and on 
the loth the}^ ran two trains each way, with coke as fuel, making a 
part of the trip at the rate of thirty miles an hour. 

The passenger cars were simply coach bodies placed upon the 
trucks for temporary use, according seats for fifteen or eighteen per- 
sons. August 13 a large company assembled to take a trip on the 
railroad, but the DeWitt Clinton engine, built at the West Point 
foundry, in New York, proved defective in her boiler, and was 
returned for repairs. At this trial, and in previous ones, coal or coke 
had been used for fuel, but wood was finally adopted. On the 9th 
of September the DeWitt Clinton was again put upon the rail, and 
succeeded in drawing a train over the road in forty-five minutes. It 
was not until the 2 2d of September that the directors advertised to 
take passengers, although city officials and other dignitaries had 
passed over the road both by steam and horse power early in August. 
The road was still uncompleted and used only from the junction, as 
it was called, two miles from the foot of State street, in Albany, 
from which place passengers were taken to the train by stage coaches. 
The other terminus of the road was still at the bluff overlooking 
Schenectady, where passengers were again transferred to stages. 
The distance traversed was less than thirteen miles. 

The precise time when the directors of the road left, prepared to 
crown the success of their labors by a grand excursion, was on the 
24th of September, 1831. To this demonstration, by invitation, 
came the state and city officials and a number of eminent citizens of 
New York. The train, drawn by the DeWitt Clinton, started off 
with three cars and returned with five cars, making the return trip 
in thirty-five minutes. 

There is a picture of the depot built by the Mokawk and Hudson 
now in the possession of Mr. Henry Ramsay of this city, whose 



THE OLD DEPOT. 165 

father was then chief engineer of Western Incline. It was a very 
small corporation for the Hon. Henry Ramsay to handle, for he was 
one of the most eminent men of his profession. His merit was sub- 
sequently recognized, as he attained its highest rank in the position 
of State Engineer. The drawing is the work of Engineer Ramsay 
himself. The beauty, convenience and comfort of the structure is 
surprising. From the foot of the inclined plane, of which more here- 
after, the cars were drawn by horses. Looking north from State 
street, the Givens Hotel was on the right, the residence of Wil- 
liam C. Young, superintendent of the road, on the left. The depot 
itself stood apparently (the picture is not on a scale) about 100 feet 
north of the building line of State street, a handsome barricade 
crowned with large and highly ornamented lamps closed the way. 
From the southwest corner of the depot a really tasty and elegant 
veranda ran south along the east wall of the Givens Hotel at a right 
angle westward on State street across its front. Resolve Givens 
evidently had a pull. Everything around the depot went his way. 
The same style of elegant corridors extended from the southeast cor- 
ner of the building parallel with the Givens veranda to the corner 
of Superintendent Young's house and turning at right angles went 
eastward along its front so as to enclose it. In this latter building 
were the business offices of the road. The passenger, baggage and 
express rooms were under a large roofed enclosure similar, though 
much smaller than the Troy depot before its recent destruction. Its 
front was a conception of decided beauty. It was evidently designed 
by somebody familiar with the remains of the Forum at Rome, and 
the Pantheon at Athens, for there is a combination of the styles of 
both, very modest and unpretentious, as in such a small building it 
should be, but the effect was both striking and pleasing. At the 
inner angles of the corridors or verandas in State street were the 
public entrances. The depot, the hotel and Mr. Young's house were 
burned down in 1843. The Givens was rebuilt in the old tavern 
style, that so many of us easily remember, on the site now occupied 
by the stately Edison. An architecturally miserable, unsightly, in- 
convenient, little horror took its place. The mercy of this chronicle 



i66 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

forbears to make any effort to discover who originated or was respon- 
sible for the infliction of this outrage upon a city which had suffered 
its share of barbarian outrage long years before. Yet the N. Y. C. 
strangely permits the picture of its shame still to hang on depot 
walls. That depot retarded Schenectady's progress for fifty years. 
The wayfarer on the train averted his gaze, and in the summer held 
his nose. The Schenectadian came to it in horror when he must 
and fled from it in disgust when he could. 

In January, 1832, the company reported to the Legislature that the 
amount actually paid and disbursed in the construction of the road 
was $483,215, and that $156,693 would be required to complete it. 

In the spring of 1832, the road was completed throughout its 
whole line, and the inclined plane being in working order, another 
grand excursion was given on the 14th of May, extending from the 
foot of Gansevoort street, Albany, into the heart of Schenectady. 

" Billy " Marshall was conductor of the trains. He went around 
on the outside on a platform built along the sides, put his head in at 
the windows and yelled "tickets!" When the Schenectady Street Rail- 
road was opened more than half a century later, Billy was accorded 
the honor of being one of the passengers on its first excursion train 
and was given an ovation all along the line. 

There was no cab over the engineer. He suffered bitterly in the 
winter. The spokes of the engine drivers were of wood as late as 
1 841 and 1842. The rails were at first flat slabs of iron laid on 
heavy wooden rails called " H " rails. About the middle of the for- 
ties " T " rails came into use, and at once supplanted the terrible 
*' H," that driven into the wood by spikes would loosen until the 
turned end would catch a following wheel and shoot up through, 
several accidents of indescribable horror occurring from this cause. 

The cars were drawn up the inclined plane by means of a long rope 
attached to them and to a stationary engine at the top, the whole 
leading and balanced by a car loaded with stone descending on the 
opposite track. This same ceremony was observed at both termina- 
tions of the road, occupying much time. The same style of coaches 
were still used. In the fall of this year a new pattern of car was 
built at Schenectady, more nearly like those now in use, the archi- 



ANOTHER RAILROAD. 167 

tectiire of which was modeled from Dr. Nott's parlor stove, and was 
called the Gothic car. 

In 1 841 the inclined planes at both ends of the road, were done 
away with, and locomotives were used on the whole length of the 
road. The success of this road, and the advantages of this means of 
communication, although rudely constructed at great and much need- 
less expense, became so apparent, that within three years railroads, 
duly chartered by law, were projected in every part of the state. 

The next railroad built in this section was called the Saratoga and 
Schenectady Railroad, and ran from Schenectady to Saratoga. This 
company was formed February i6th, 1831, and the road was com- 
pleted and in operation in 1832. This road really began by a con- 
nection with the basin at the lift bridge at Church street. A bridge 
was built there to meet the needs of the road. From thence it ran 
through Railroad street, having its station for passengers at the cor- 
ner of Water street, where is the row of brick buildings built by the 
late Hon. A. W. Hunter for Roy & Co., of the shawl works. From 
the station it was a horse railroad running through a subway under 
State street, east of the present building occupied by the Young 
Women's Christian Association, from thence straight through close 
to the easterly line of the residence of Judge Strong on Union street, 
and from there crossing the street it ran just east of the present 
County Clerk's office, and in rear of the residences of Judge Jackson 
and Ex-District Attorney Naylon, under Front street, beneath the 
present residence of Mrs. Robinson. After crossing Front street it 
curved through the property now owned by Mr. Jacob Vrooman, 
where it emerged from the elevation through which it had been cut, 
and crossed the Mohawk bridge. The engine house was a brick 
building on the Glenville side, demolished only a few years ago. A 
little wheelbarrow of an engine then picked up the train and took it 
to Saratoga. About twelve years after the construction of the road 
another line was laid out and the track of the Utica and Schenectady 
railroad was used to the sand bank where the road branched off to 
the north. About twenty-five years ago the route was again changed, 
a bridge built and the present line adopted. This road is now part 
of the system of the Delaware & Hudson Company. 



i68 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

In 1835 the Utica and Schenectady road was constructed, and in 
1843 the Schenectady and Troy branch was built. 

It will be seen at this early date in the history of railroads in this 
country, that Schenectady enjoyed facilities for communication by 
rail, equal to, if not surpassing, any place in the state. 

In 1853 ^ company was formed by consolidating all the railroads 
then in operation, and some projected roads between Albany and 
Buffalo, called the New York Central Railroad. This consolidation 
included the Mohawk and Hudson, the Schenectady and Troy and 
the Utica and Schenectady railroads. The act allowing the consoli- 
dation was passed April 2, 1853, ^^^ carried into effect May 17th, 
1854. This road runs from Albany to Buffalo. It was finished and 
in operation in 1855. 

In 1869 this company consolidated with the Hudson River road, 
running from Albany to New York, under the corporation name of 
the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad, thus opening a 
road under the management of one company, extending from the 
great lakes to the Atlantic seaport. 

In 1874, this road from Albany to Buffalo, was increased from two 
tracks to four, making it the only four-track road in the United 
States. 

In 1869, the Schenectady and Duanesburgh road was incorporated, 
with a capital of $150,000, and completed in 1873. ^^ ^^^"^ from 
Schenectady to Quaker Street, and connects at the latter place with 
the Albany and Susquehanna road. It is, with the latter road, a part 
of the Delaware & Hudson system. 

In 1866, a road called the Athens Branch was constructed. It 
runs from Athens to Schenectady, and is now owned and operated 
by the New York, West Shore and Buffalo Railroad. 

In 1883, the New York, West Shore and Buffalo Railroad was 
constructed, and runs through the western portion of Schenectady 
County, having a station at South Schenectady, about two and a half 
miles from the city. 

This completes a necessarily brief account of the railroads in 
Schenectady County, which today form the most important business 



RAVAGES OF CHOLERA. 169 

interest of this city which can almost lay claim to the proud distinc- 
tion of having been the birthplace of the great railway system of 
the world. 



CHAPTER XVH. 
The Cholera and After. 



1832 was a year of horror for Schenectady. The whole country 
was awaiting with terror the approach of the Asiatic cholera. Fear 
was intensified when news came that the disease had landed at Que- 
bec and was enroute eastward and southward. So, on June i6th, 
1832, the common council passed the following resolution: 

Whereas, It appears from various accounts in the public papers 
that the Asiatic cholera has reached this country and is now raging 
in Montreal and Quebec, it appears to this board proper to take 
every necessary prudential measure to prevent the spread of the 
disease. 

June 1 6th the mayor reported as follows : 

"That agreeable to the suggestions of the Board of Health, he 
has caused two apartments to be fitted up in the old brick college 
edifice, which report having been accepted, 

Resolved, That the said rooms be appropriated for such uses as 
this board or the health officer, (Dr. John S. L. Tonnelier) of this 
city, may deem necessary for the promotion of the public health, but 
that said apartments shall not be used as a cholera hospital. 

Resolved, That the account of William Marshall, amounting to 
one dollar, for removing Samuel Ostrander, supposed to be of cholera 
and in indigent circumstances, be paid by the treasurer and charged 
to the county." 

September loth the following minute appears in the record : 

" Resolved, That the mayor be authorized to recommend to the 
citizens to set apart Thursday next as a day of prayer and praise to 



lyo SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Almighty God for permitting the violence of the pestilence (cholera) 
that scourges our beloved country, to pass over us." 

It is difficult to understand the last resolution. It utters thanks 
for the passage over the city of the violence of the pestilence. What 
must it have been elsewhere, for there are those yet living who 
remember with horror its awful ravages. When it struck the 
city it began its work at once and fiercely. It was a new and 
unknown disease. It is to the lasting credit of medical science that 
in civilized lands the scourge like the small-pox that used to slay or 
mutilate its thousands, no longer has any terrors when its coming is 
heralded, and it is stopped at the harbor gates, even in Canada. That 
natural neighbor of ours has twice bestowed the beneficence upon 
us, but she has at last learned to keep it away from herself. 

The cholera then was unknown and therefore the more terrible 
horror. Nobody knew how to handle it and the fatality was enor- 
mous. It was battled with by Drs. Tonnelier, McDugal and 
McGuffin. Dr. Toll, a retired physician, entered the lists against 
the dragon. Mr. Lawrence C. Van Eps, then living opposite the 
Dutch Church Cemetery in Green street, says that funerals were 
incessant, almost hourly. It was not only fatal to a terrible degree, 
but a short and indescribable agony until collapse set in. In the 
dying hours a greenish hue spread over the features that added 
horror to the awful scene. It was especially deadly along Caslorn 
Creek, Rotterdam border and on the flats in Rotterdam street and 
Frog Alley, so-called. An eye-witness relates that a man was 
stricken with it in Governor's Lane and was carried away dead in 
two hours. The frost killed it in September. 

It came again in 1849, watched in its approach with the same 
shivering terror, and this time many remember that, though lacking 
greatly the violence of the visitation of 1832, it was still such a pes- 
tilence that with all the ravages of diphtheria we have never seen the 
like of it since. Many living will remember that in August 26th, 
the whole city was shocked with the news that the awful scourge 
had mounted College Hill, and in that pure air had stricken down in 
ten hours the Rev. John Austin Yates, D. D., Professor of Rhetoric. 
Dr. Yates was taken ill Saturday night, and at Sunday morning 



POPULATION IN 1845. 171 

service it was announced from the pulpit, Dr. Backus falling back 
into his chair as he read the announcement for which he was utterly 
unprepared. 

When the scourge again came in 1854, it did little harm. It 
advanced in more threatening form in 1866, but was stamped out 
and never reached here again. A strange feature of its visit in 1866 
was the death by unquestioned Asiatic cholera of two of the well 
known TuUock family on the Princetown Hills. 

In 1845 the population of the city was only 6,555. Railroad and 
canal had made a way-station of the town, forgetful of the renown 
and credit that belonged to her as the mother of the passenger rail- 
way system of the continent. When she halted in new progress, as 
she had for a long time, the name of " Old Dorp" was put upon her; 
cheap jokes as to her being fenced all around and ceiled overhead, 
began to circulate over the land. The passenger saw the frowning 
discomfort of the depot sheds on one side, saw Isha Banker's black- 
smith shop, Clute and Bailey's foundry and the tavern-like Givens 
Hotel on the other, and hastened on out of the town. But Isha 
Banker was a first-class workman, reared a fine family of first-class 
citizens; the Givens Hotel up to within a few years of its obliteration 
by the Edison, gave as good a fare as could be found on the whole 
line of the railroad, and handsome fortunes for thosQ days were 
made there. Clute and Bailey became Clute Brothers, with Spencer 
Ostrom, a past-master in mechanism, as its foreman. Uncle Sam 
owes the salvation and the rescue of the forlorn remnant of his navy 
to those same Clute Brothers of whom John B. and Jethro Clute are 
the survivors. They built the engines and machinery of the little 
Monitor that overthrew and sunk the Merrimac, and was the pioneer 
of the grander battleship of our splendid navy of today. And one 
of their proud achievements, never to be forgotten, was the construc- 
tion of the machinery and engines of the picket boats participating 
in the dare devil exploit of Cushing in the destruction of the Albe- 
marle. 

Lines of passenger packets were running from Schenectady to 
Utica, and the runners with John Bowtell at the head, were scream- 
ing for patronage at the store-steps where Mr. John Ellis now keeps 



172 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

his fruit store. They were long, sharp-pointed, handsomely painted 
and state-roomed and upholstered in grand style for that day. The 
dock was called the battleground because of the boatmen's fights of 
almost daily occurrence. At the swing bridge was the dry-dock. 
On the sight of the present freight depot, was the famous old " Bulls- 
head " where canalers lived and fought. 

An awful battle nearly occurred at the dry-dock (Swing Bridge) in 
the summer of 1848. There was a style of firemen's contest in 
those days of the volunteer firemen that would be impossible now. 
There were five volunteer companies in Schenectady: Protection i. 
Deluge 2, Niagara 3, Neptune 4 and Conqueror 5. The firemen's 
tournament consisted of a strife decided when one of the hand 
engines succeeded in flooding the other. 

No. 4 had invited No. 8 of Albany to act as their allies against 
No. 2 and 3 combined. The contest was fierce, two relays 
of men on each of the brakes relieving one another. Five minutes 
was always more than time enough to decide the strife. One of the 
engines was either pumped dry or overflowed in less than that time. 
Four and eight won, flooding Deluge No. 2. Cheating was claimed 
by the defeated party. Of course a fight ensued ; it always did, and 
it always found men equipped for the emergency. 

But this was no ordinary fight. It developed into a terrible riot. 
The exasperated, insanely enraged laddies, used to fire fighting, carried 
the battle all through the streets. The town constables were power- 
less, stores were closed, people fled into their homes and the battle 
raged until nightfall rested on the battered Albanians strewn along 
the Albany turnpike. Searcher Smith, foremost in the melee, still 
lives. Anyone looking at the old man now can see traces of that 
physical power that made him the Fitzsimmons of this region. And 
he was the master of the situation. The firemen of that day fought 
everything but fire. What a splendid contrast is the magnificent 
outfit of Chief Yates and his officers and men of to-day. 

Scrapping matches, as they are called in the vernacular of this 
day, were common between the students and the " townies." Union 
had nearly 400 undergraduates, largely made up of western and 
southern men. There were no locomotive works nor General Elec- 




-r^y^yj^ -'' -"'^ 




J 



A GREAT INDUSTRY. 173 

trie works and the fighting gangs were nearly equal. A tremendous 
battle was fought in West College yard, led on by a future president 
of the United States, in 1845, which even the venerable president, 
bareheaded on the old stone steps, could not for a long time subdue, 
and not till some of the contestants had to be fished out of the canal. 

But Schenectady soon took a boom. Some enterprising citizens, 
among their number the Hon. Daniel D. Campbell, Simon C. Groot 
and others, conceived the idea of erecting here locomotive works and 
established a corporation that is now sending its products all over the 
world, the roar of whose progress is heard from New York around to 
Japan. Associated with the incorporators was John Ellis, one of the 
shrewdest, ablest, hardheaded Scotchmen and skillful mechanics 
this state has ever known. 

The Norris Brothers of Philadelphia, about as eminent locomo- 
tive builders as lived in the land, came to take control of the little 
plant, whose main building was about the size of the thriving man- 
ufactory of Weiderhold & Co., with a little brass foundry adjoining 
and still standing. The Norrises started well but for some reason 
made a bad failure in the end. They built an engine in 1849 called 
the " Lightning." It had single drivers seven and one-half feet in 
diameter. It was to revolutionize locomotion. But it could not 
revolutionize itself or revolve its wheels. It froze up on its trial 
trip, so that it could not start. When thawed out and put on the 
road, the friction was not great enough to hold the wheels. It lost 
motion, and what was worse, lost time. This failure, added to other 
causes, broke up the Norrises to the regret of Schenectady, with 
whom these genial hearted Philadelphians were exceedingly popular. 
The sheriff sold them out. The stockholders took charge in 1850. 

A disagreement occurred, in fact grew chronic among the share- 
holders. Ellis had the strength of his convictions and, when dis- 
putes arose, with true Scottish tenacity of belief and purpose he 
would not give way. He was the only real mechanic of the outfit and 
believed he understood the business. Subsequent events showed 
that he did. At one deadlock, the stockholders, inflamed with vexa- 
tion, determined to get rid of him. The great builder, as he became, 
seems to have been expecting the outbreak and to be prepared. His 



174 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

partners made him a proposition to name his price and they would 
name theirs. They announced the price at which they would sell. 
He announced his. Theirs was tremendous but Ellis' was out of 
sight. They thought their demand was above his means, but he 
promptly accepted their terms and the Ellis work went on its way 
with John Ellis at the throttle. Walter McQueen, father of the 
Hon. D. P. McQueen, formerly member of assembly from this 
county, was associated with him ; a grand mechanic understanding 
every phase of the business. The McQueen engine became known 
all over the United States. One of them, purchased by the govern- 
ment, rolled into Fairfax Court House one fine afternoon in the fall 
of 1862, when the 134th was lying there drilling for the awful expe- 
rience they were destined to undergo. The Schenectady men recog- 
nized an old friend and swarming about it, patted it like a horse and 
would have hugged it if they could. The genius of McQueen and 
the business ability of Ellis were building up an immense plant soon 
to rival the Baldwins of Philadelphia and the Rogers of Paterson. 

Ellis died after living to see the works he had established take 
rank among the leading industries of America and to send the name 
of McQueen all over the continent. He left a large fortune. His 
son took his place as president. Under his management the works 
grew and throve. John C, dying, Charles, a younger brother, suc- 
ceeded to the control. Charles survived him but a few years and 
Edward, a younger brother, came to the direction. Two years ago 
death visited this family and removed Edward ; and William D., the 
youngest son, is at this writing the president of the plant. All these 
men, by the wise foresight of the father, were practically educated 
in the business. Walter McQueen retired old, full of honors and 
possessed of ample fortune. His burden was taken up by A. J. 
Pitkin. To-day the plant is one of the largest in the world, its 
workmanship unsurpassed and in recent trials outstripping every 
locomotive on earth. " 999 " of the Empire State Express was the 
admiration of every sightseer at the Columbian Exposition at Chi- 
cago. Yet " 999 " is an every day engine now beside the monster of 
the type of 2207. 

The Ellis sons were men of large generosity, every one of them. 



THE CIVIL WAR. 175 

The Ellis hospital was founded by Charles G., the second son, and 
the family have helped to sustain the grand beneficence. Each one of 
them left a princely fortune and the wealth of each did immeasur- 
able though unostentatious good. 



CHAPTER XVni. 

Schenectady in the Civil War and the Latter Half of 
THE Century. 

The population of Schenectady ran up to 13,000 by the time the 
war broke out. She entered the ordeal of 1861 full of loyalty but 
she was a Democratic city by nature and habit. She had Copper- 
heads, more than her share, but on their appearance after the first 
Bull Run, they were promptly suppressed. The following record is 
taken from the admirable compilation of Rev. J. H. Munsell : 

" The first company organized in Schenectady for the late Civil 
War, was the Seward Volunteer Zouaves, afterwards known as Com- 
pany A., Eighteenth Regiment, New York Volunteers. This com- 
pany was organized by William Seward Gridley, who was elected its 
captain, and who commanded it at the first battle of Bull Run. 

"On the 12th of April, 1861, Fort Sumpter was bombarded, and 
evacuated by Major Anderson on the 15th. On this same day. Presi- 
dent Lincoln called for 75,000 men to suppress the insurrection. 
The next day the New York Legislature passed a bill, which was 
signed by Governor Morgan, appropriating three million dollars for 
the purpose of raising and equipping 30,000 volunteers. 

"On the 1 8th day of April, or six days after the first shot was 
fired at Fort Sumpter, the following notice was published in the 
Schenectady Daily Times : 

" Attention Volunteers — All young men who are in favor of 
forming a light infantry company and offering their services to garri- 
son this state, or to the President of the United States, to aid and 



176 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

assist in defending the Constitution and Union of the United States 
against foreign or domestic foes, are requested to meet at Cleary's 
saloon, opposite the railroad depot, on Friday evening at 7.30 o'clock, 
the 19th inst. This means fight, and all who sign must go. 

Wm. Seward Gridley." 

At the meeting held in response to this notice forty-seven men 
signed an application for a company organization, and asked Gover- 
nor Morgan to commission William Seward Gridley, captain ; Daniel 
Daley, first lieutenant, and Edward W. Groat, ensign of said company. 
Gridley took the application to Albany, and received an order from 
the Adjutant General to report at Albany with his company on the 
22d day of April, 1861. In the same order. Lieutenant Simon G. 
Smith, of the Twenty-sixth Regiment, New York Militia, wag 
ordered to inspect and muster said company, and to preside over an 
election of the officers. The muster and election took place on the 
20th of April, when the same officers were elected that Governor 
Morgan was asked to commission. In two days this company was 
organized and officered, and three days from the time of the call was 
ordered to report for duty at Albany. 

May 14th, 1 86 1, the Eighteenth Regiment, New York Volunteers, 
was organized, and this company (then called the Seward Volunteer 
Zouaves) was assigned to that regiment as Company " A." At this 
time it numbered seventy-four men and three officers. About sixty 
of the men were from Schenectady. 

May 17th, 1 861, the Eighteenth Regiment was mustered into the 
service of the United States, and on the i8th of June following, 
started for Washington, being one of the regiments in the first fight 
of Bull Run. 

Captain Gridley was promoted to the rank of major October 14th, 
1862, and received at the close of the war the honorary title of 
Brevet Colonel, New York Volunteers. Daniel Daley was promoted 
to the captaincy of this company, November loth, 1862, and was 
honorably discharged February 26th, 1863. Edward W. Groat was 
promoted from ensign to second lieutenant July 4th, 1861, but 
resigned December i8th, 1861. March 5th, 1863, he became major 
of the 134th Regiment. Joseph Strunk, who entered Gridley 's com- 



SECOND COMPANY ORGANIZED. 177 

pany as sergeant, was mustered out May 28th, 1863, as second lieu- 
tenant. He was commissioned December I4tli, 1863, as captain in 
the Second Regiment, Veteran Cavalry, and at the close of the war 
was made brevet major of New York Volunteers. 

The second company organized in Schenectady was formed by 
Stephen Truax. The officers who received their commissions May 
2, 1861, were: Captain, Stephen Truax ; first lieutenant, William 
Horsfall ; ensign, John Vedder. This company was enrolled in the 
Eighteenth Regiment as Company E, May 17th, 1861, (same time as 
Captain Gridley's company), for a term of two years. Captain Truax 
resigned December 27th of this year, and was succeeded in command 
by William Horsfall, who was killed while gallantly leading his 
company at Crampton Gap, Maryland, September 14th, 1861. John 
Vedder succeeded him as captain, and remained in command until 
the company was mustered out of service May 28th, 1863. Alfred 
Truax, who entered this company as sergeant, was promoted to the 
rank of first lieutenant December 15th, 1862. Andrew C. Barup 
became second lieutenant. 

E. Nott Schermerhorn, who enlisted in this company as first ser- 
geant, rose in succession to second lieutenancy, and became one of 
the adjutants of the regiment November 18, 1862, holding the latter 
rank when the regiment was mustered out May 28th, 1863. 

The Eighteenth Regiment was one of the first organized during 
the war, participating in the first battle of Bull Run, Crampton Gap, 
West Point, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Antietam, Fredericks- 
burg, Salem Church and Savage Station. For a short time the late 
Dr. James L. Van Ingen was one of the surgeons of this regiment. 
When the time for which this regiment was mustered into service 
expired, the present captain of the Thirty-seventh Company, 
National Guard, State of New York, George W. Marlette, was the 
only private in the regiment who received from Governor Morgan, 
for gallant and meritorious service, the honorary rank of brevet 
lieutenant. 

William A. Jackson, son of the late Professor Jackson of Union 
College, was colonel of the Eighteenth Regiment from the time of 
its organization till his death from disease at Washington, November 



178 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

loth, 1861. William H. Young, another gallant soldier from 
Schenectady, was for a short time, lieutenant-colonel of this regi- 
ment. 

The third company formed in Schenectady was organized by 
Barent M. Van Voast, June ist, 1861. The officers who received 
their commissions July 4th, 1861, were: Captain, Barent M. Van 
Voast ; first lieutenant. Manse V. V. Smith ; ensign, Edward Van 
Voast. This company contained seventy-four privates and three 
officers. It was enrolled in the Thirtieth Regiment as Company C, 
for a term of two years from June ist, 1861. 

Captain Van Voast was dismissed March 7th, 1862, and was suc- 
ceeded by Manse V. V. Smith, who resigned November 26th of the 
same year. Edward Van Voast became first lieutenant May 13th, 
1862, retaining this rank when the company was mustered out 
June 1 8th, 1863. He afterwards became major in the Second Regi- 
ment of Veteran Cavalry, and at the close of service of this regi- 
ment, was made a brevet lieutenant-colonel of New York Volunteers. 

Charles Roth, who entered Company C as first sergeant, was pro- 
moted to the rank of first lieutenant March 4th, 1863, and subse- 
quently commissioned a brevet major of New York Volunteers. 

The Thirtieth Regiment, with which Company C was most honor- 
ably connected, participated in the battles of Gainesville, South 
Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. 

The fourth company formed at Schenectady, was organized by 
Allan H. Jackson, who received a captain's commission October ist, 
1 86 1, This company consisted of eighty-seven members, including 
the officers. It was enrolled as Company G, in the Ninety-first 
Regiment, for a term of three years, being mustered out of service 
July 3d, 1865. The officers who were commissioned at the same 
time as Jackson were : George W. Shaffer, first lieutenant, and Wil- 
liam Harty, second lieutenant. 

Captain Jackson was honorably discharged from this company 
February 23d, 1863, and promoted to the rank of major in the 134th 
Regiment. March 4th, 1863, he became lieutenant-colonel, and on 
December loth of the same year, colonel of this regiment, but was 
mustered out of service June loth, 1865, as lieutenant-colonel. 



OTHER BRAVE SOLDIERS. 179 

Georo^e W. Shaffer succeeded Jackson as captain of Company G, 
December 31st, 1864. Shaffer was promoted to major of the Sixty- 
first N. Y. Vohmteers and subsequently received the honorary rank 
of brevet lieutenant-colonel, N. Y. V. 

William Harty succeeded Shaffer as captain of Company G, Decem- 
ber 24th, 1864, and remained in command until the company was 
mustered out of service. 

Cornelius Gill entered this company as second sergeant, and was 
promoted through the successive ranks to first lieutenant, which 
position he held when the company was disbanded. 

Between the middle of August and the 3d of September, 1862, 
there were four military companies formed at Schenectady, which 
entered the service for a term of three years. All four were enrolled 
in the 134th Regiment, and were known as Companies A, B, F and H. 

Company A was organized by Captain Watkins. 

Company B was organized by David H. Hamlin, who received his 
commission as captain August 17th, 1862. At the same time Soly- 
man G. Hamlin was commissioned first lieutenant and Soloman C. 
Wilson, second lieutenant. This company numbered 102 men and 
participated in many of the great battles of the war. Benjamin F. 
Sheldon was captain of this company when it was mustered out. 
Solyman G. Hamlin was promoted to captain of Company C, March 
7th, 1863. April 7th, 1865, he was major of the i92d Regiment, 
and was mustered out of the service August 28th, 1865, with the 
honorary rank of brevet captain, N. Y. V. 

Lucius Mead, who enlisted in Company B as first sergeant, was 
promoted to a lieutenancy. He w^as killed while bravely leading his 
company at the battle of Gettysburg. 

Company F was organized by Gilbert D. Kennedy, who was com- 
missioned as captain August 30th, 1862. At the same time were 
commissioned George A. Turnbull as first lieutenant and Clinton C. 
Brown as second lieutenant. 

Captain Kennedy was promoted to the rank of major June 23, 1863, 
and died of disease at Philadelphia, August 3, of the same year, 

George A. Turnbull succeeded Kennedy as captain of Company 
F, but resigned February 3, 1864. 



i8o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Clinton C. Brown was promoted to captain April 14th, 1863, and 
to lieutenant-colonel of the 134th, July 27th, 1864. 

Company H was organized by Austin A. Yates, who received his 
commission as captain, September, 1862, with Geradus Carley as 
first lieutenant and Marcus A. Herrick as second lieutenant. Cap- 
tain Yates was discharged on June loth, 1863, on account of defec- 
tive eyesight, but re-entered the service as captain of Company F, of 
the Fourteenth Veteran Corps. This regiment participated in the 
engagement against Early in front of Washington. Captain Yates 
was promoted to the rank of brevet major by President Lincoln, and 
was Assistant Judge Advocate General at Washington, D. C, one 
year subsequent to August, 1866, when he was mustered out of 
service. 

William H. Mickle, who enlisted in Company H as second ser- 
geant, was made captain, April 22, 1865. Barney S. Smith, another 
sergeant, became captain February 28th, 1865, and was mustered out 
of the service as a brevet major, N. Y. V. 

The 134th Regiment, of which the three preceding companies 
formed a part, participated in the battles of Chancellorville, Gettys- 
burg, Missionary Ridge, Knoxville, Atlanta, Resaca, Dallas, Pine 
Knob, Lost Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Savannah and Goldsboro. 
At the overthrow of the Eleventh Corps, on the afternoon of Satur- 
day, May 3d, at the battle of Chancellorville, the 134th was engaged 
in reconnoitering in the enemy's line and did not share in that ter- 
rible retreat, but took active part in the battle of the next morning, 
i Companies A and I of the 134th were raised and credited to Scho- 
i harie county, yet both contained many Schenectady men. In Com- 
'^pany A, Henry Y. Bradt, first lieutenant, and the names of Garret 
'Horsfall and Andrew A. Kelly are worthy of mention. In Com- 
pany I, Frank Fletcher was captain, and afterwards became chaplain 
of the regiment, and was mustered out of the service as brevet 
major, N. Y. V. Albert G. Washburn entered this company as first 
lieutenant and was promoted to captain. He died in camp, near 
Falmouth, Va., January 26th, 1863. 

In Company I, Charles A. Ahreets enlisted as orderly sergeant, 
and by promotions, earned by gallantry, became adjutant of the 



SCHENECTADY SOLDIERS. i8i 

134th, July 27th, 1864. He was killed while acting as assistant 
adjutant-general, in the siege of Savannah, December 13th, 1864. 

Edwin Forrest enlisted in Company B of the 134th, as first lieu- 
tenant, December 2d, 1862. January 30th, 1864, he was made cap- 
tain of this company. He died from wounds received at the battle 
of Dug Gap, May 20th, 1864. 

Thomas Forrest, a brother of Edwin, enlisted as second lieutenant 
in Company F, of the 134th, and was promoted to first lieutenant, 
March 7th, 1863. He was subsequently made brevet captain, N. 
Y. V. 

Among the Schenectadians who served with distinction in the 
rebellion, whose names have not been previously mentioned, were A. 
Y. Carner, Henry Ramsay, Jr., James T. Joslin and A. Barclay 
Mitchel. Carner was made quartermaster of the 134th, October, 
1862. Ramsay entered this same regiment as a lieutenant and was 
also made quartermaster. Joslin and Mitchel entered the service as 
lieutenants and were promoted to the rank of captain, Joslin in the 
134th and Mitchel in the Eighteenth. 

Although the 119th Regiment was raised and organized in New 
York city, some of its best and bravest officers came from Schenec- 
tady. Indeed its first commanding officer was Col. Elias Peissner, 
a son-in-law of the late Prof. Tayler Lewis of Union College. Col. 
Peissner was a brave and courageous officer, and after gallantly lead- 
ing his regiment in a number of engagements, was killed at the bat- 
tle of Chancellorville, May 2d, 1863. 

In Company B, of the 119th, Charles F. Lewis, son of the late 
Prof. Lewis, enlisted as second lieutenant, but was promoted in suc- 
cession to the rank of first lieutenant, captain and major. Subse- 
quently wounded at Chancellorville and brevetted major for gallant 
and meritorious service on the field of battle. 

In Company D of the 119th, Henry R. Schwerin, another Sche- 
nectadian, enlisted as second lieutenant. He was promoted to first 
lieutenant April loth, 1863, and was killed at the battle of Chancel- 
lorville, May 6, 1863. 

The Seventy-seventh Regiment, although organized in Saratoga 

13 



i82 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

county, contained a number of Schenectady men. In Company H 
of this rco^iment fully a fourth of the number were from this county. 
In this company David J. Caw enlisted as first sergeant. His worth 
and gallantry secured him rapid promotion. March 21, 1862, he was 
commissioned second lieutenant ; September 23, first lieutenant ; 
December loth, captain ; December 20th, 1864, major, and four days 
after, lieutenant-colonel, with which rank he was mustered out of 
the service, June 27th, 1865. July 6th, 1865, for gallant and meri- 
torious services, he was commissioned colonel by Governor Morgan. 
On the same date, his brother, William E. Caw, who entered Com- 
pany H a corporal, received a commission as first lieutenant. 

The Seventy-seventh Regiment, it will be remembered, was a part 
of the Sixth Corps, and accompanied the Army of the Potomac 
through all its memorable campaigns, participating in the battles of 
Yorktown, Williamsburg, Golding's Farm, Savage Station, White 
Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Crampton Gap, Antietam, Mary's 
Heights, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Rappahannock 
Station, Petersburg, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor, Fort Stevens, 
Opequan, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. 

In the Second Regiment of Veteran Cavalry, besides Edward Van 
Voast and Joseph Strunk, already mentioned, were Charles W. John- 
son, Albert Westinghouse and Sherman A. Case. Johnson was pro- 
moted from lieutenant to quartermaster. Westinghouse was a 
lieutenant in one of the companies of this regiment. He was killed 
in action December loth, 1864. Case also served as a lieutenant, 
and was mustered out of service with this rank November 8th, 1865. 
Among the surgeons from Schenectady who entered the service 
during the Civil War were : G. W. Van Voast, J. D. Jones, Alfred G. 
McDonald and William Hoag. Jones was a surgeon in the Twenty- 
second Cavalry, McDonald in the Twelfth Cavalry and Hoag in the 
134th Infantry. 

J. J. DeP'orest, a resident of the town of Duanesburgh, was colonel 
of the Eighty-first Regiment during the war. He was reared in 
Oswego. 

The i92d Regiment was composed principally of men who had 
already served one term of enlistment. This regiment was one of 



SCHENECTADY SOLDIERS. 183 

the last organized during the war, having been mustered in the ser- 
vice in the fore part of the year 1865. No less than 133 in this 
regiment were from Schenectady, among whom was the late Soly- 
man G. Hamlin, a brave and courageous soldier, who, as has been 
previously stated, was promoted to the rank of major in the regi- 
ment. 

The Eighty-third Regiment for home protection, composed entirely 
of companies in the city and county of Schenectady, was formed 
April 27th, 1863. It was composed of ten companies, and formed a 
part of the Eighteenth Brigade, Fifth Division, when first organized, 
but soon after was included in the Thirteenth Brigade, Third 
Division. July 23, 1873, i^ was reduced to a battalion of six com- 
panies. It was disbanded January 17th, 1874. 

The original officers of this regiment were : James Fuller, colonel; 
Robert Furman, lieutenant-colonel ; John C. Barhydt, major ; Vedder 
V. Van Patten, adjutant ; L. Dodge, quartermaster ; J. O. Timber- 
man, surgeon ; Cornelius Van Santvoord, chaplain. 

Robert Furman was made colonel August 6th, 1864, and John 
McShea, lieutenant-colonel. Gershom Banker was made major 
July 12, 1866. Benjamin F. Sheldon was made adjutant June 20, 
1866, and major October 17, 1867. George W. Marlette was made 
adjutant January 4, 1868, and major May 27, 1871. John C. Perry 
became major December 29, 1869, and lieutenant-colonel May 28, 
1869. Michael H. Lamp was made adjutant September 22, 1871, 
and Edward H. Vrooman became quartermaster June 14, 1867. 
James D. Jones was at one time surgeon and Dennis Wortman, chap- 
lain. 

After the close of the war, a company composed of army and 
navy veterans, called the Soldiers' and Sailors' Union, was formed, 
of which Major Rafle Van Burnt was commander. Some time after 
this company disbanded and formed the Schenectady Zouave Cadets. 
Major Rafle Van Burnt was its first captain. He was succeeded by 
Captain Austin A. Yates. This company existed for a number of 
years, when its name was changed to William Horsfall Post, No. 14. 
A. A. Yates, G. W. Marlette and William G. Caw were commanders 
of this company at different periods. The name of this post was 



i84 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

subsequently cliano^ed to Edwin Forest Post, No. 90. G. W. Tomp- 
kins, James F. White, Frederick Eisenminger and James R. Reagles 
were at various times commanders of this post. A few years ago 
the name of the post was again changed to Post Horsfall No. 9, 
which name it still bears. The present commander is Harrison 
Stafford. 

At present there are but two military companies in Schenectady 
under the state militia laws, the Thirty-sixth and Thirty-seventh 
Separate Companies, N. G., N. Y. 

The Thirty-sixth Company, (Citizens' Corps) was mustered in the 
state militia, July 12th, 1880, for a term of five years, with fifty- 
seven members. Its first officers were : Austin A. Yates, captain ; 
Oscar Shannon, first lieutenant ; George W. Tompkins, second 
lieutenant. Its present officers are : Its captaincy is vacant ; George 
Crippen, first lieutenant ; A. Wells, second lieutenant. It is com- 
posed at the time of writing of about eighty-six members. By the 
recent promotion of Captain James M. Andrews to the mayorship of 
the Second Regiment, in which this is now Company E, it is now 
commanded by Lieutenant William M. Purman and Second Lieuten. 
ant Charles P. Marlette. 

The Thirty-seventh Company (Washington Continentals), was 
mustered in the state militia with fifty-one members, at the same 
time and for a like period of service as the Thirty-sixth. Its first 
officers were : Clinton C. Brown, captain ; Nelson McDonald, first 
lieutenant ; Thomas Gregg, second lieutenant. Captain Brown was 
succeeded by Captain George W. Marlette, By the death of first 
lieutenant Nelson McDonald, Thomas Gregg was made first lieuten- 
ant and James H. Vedder, second lieutenant. It is now called Com- 
pany F of the Second Regiment. The company is commanded by 
Captain Frank Bander ; George Crippen, first lieutenant ; Harrison 
Stafford, second lieutenant. As will be seen later, both these com- 
panies fought in the Spanish-American war. 

A semi-military organization called the Polish Lancers, (no new 
military organizations bearing arms are permitted by the Military 
Code of the state) was formed. It wears a brilliant and attractive 
uniform and carries swords. 



GEN. SHERMAN'S ENDORSEMENT. 185 

A. O. H. Rifle Corps, Company A, Michael E. Keating, captain ; 
Michael McDonough, first lientenant ; D. J. Manning, second lien- 
tenant. 

Retnrning to the war of '61-65, let ns give a tribute to Schenec- 
tady's dead. There are others who did not enter the service here. 

John B, Yates, the great grandson of Christopher Yates, entered 
the military service as a captain in the First Michigan Engineer 
Corps, rose throngh the majorship to be its colonel. Of him Gene- 
ral Sherman thns wrote : (Copy of Gen. W. T. Sherman's endorse- 
ment on Col. John B. Yates' Military History.) 

Headqnarters, Military Division, Miss. 

St. Louis, June 26th, 1866. 
I remember well the First Michigan Engineers and its Colonel 
Yates. That regiment had not only to make its marches with the 
army, but very often had to work breaking up railroads and building 
bridges all day and catch up at night. Its journal of operation dur- 
ing the campaign in Georgia and the Carolinas, would illustrate the 
absolute limit of man for physical labor. I have sometimes 
reproached myself for cruelty in imposing, or allowing to be imposed, 
in such hard and constant labors — and now I desire to say this with 
an emphasis that will show at least that I was conscious of the fact. 

(Signed) W. T. Sherman, 

Major General Commanding. 

The Colonel sleeps near his ancestor in the cemetery. 

Arthur R. Yates, brother of Cofonel Yates above named, and son 
of the Rev. John A. Yates, D. D., whose death by cholera in 1849 is 
noted heretofore, was born here in 1839, entered the naval academy 
at Annapolis on September 24th, 1853. He was graduated in 1857, 
and from that year until i860, was in the steamer Mississippi, Asiatic 
squadron. From July, i860 to December of the same year, he was 
in the steam sloop Brooklyn, Gulf squadron ; December, i860, 
to December, 1868, in sloop Cyane, Pacific squadron. He was com- 
missioned as lieutenant April 18, 1861. From January, 1864, to 
August of the same year, he was in the steamer Augusta. He was a 



i86 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

volunteer on board the flagship Hartford at the battle of Mobile Bay 
and on the evening of the battle was placed in command of the cap- 
tured gunboat Selma. From that time until June, 1867, he was suc- 
cessively in command of the Selma, J. P. Jackson and Chocorua of 
the Gulf squadron. 

He was commissioned as lieutenant-commander on November 16, 
1864. From September, 1867, to June, 1868, he was executive offi- 
cer of the flagship Piscataqua of the Asiatic squadron. From June, 
1868, to July, 1869, he was successively in command of the steamers 
Ashuelot and Unadilla, of the same squadron. In 1870-72 he was at 
the naval academy. 

On February 6th, 1872, he was commissioned as commander, com- 
manding the ironclad Manhattan, of the North Atlantic station in 
1873. He commanded the receiving ship Sabine at Portsmouth, 
1875-76 ; at League Island navy yard, 1877-78 ; commanding the 
Alliance, North Atlantic station, 1879-81 ; navy yard, Portsmouth, 
1881-84; commanding training ship New Hampshire, 1884-87. 

He was promoted to captain in February, 1884 ; waiting orders 
1887-88; commanding Pensacola, home station, 1888-90, and at the 
navy yard as executive officer in 1890-91 at Portsmouth. 

In the report of the battle of Mobile Bay, Admiral Farragut com- 
mended him highly for bravery. Before the battle he was lying with 
the reserve fleet outside the harbor under Commodore Tom Craver, 
who refused him leave to visit Farragut, but he managed to send a 
note to the great sailor under whom he had served. The admiral at 
once sent for him and made him an aide on the Hartford, where he 
fought all through. He died in Portsmouth, where he had married 
the daughter of Captain William Dwight. His widow and two 
daughters survive him. 

Col. William Jackson, son of Prof. Isaac W. Jackson of Union 
College, was a heroic fighter at the first Bull Run. He was a soldier 
by nature as had been his father before him, and previous to his tak- 
ing command of his regiment, among the first to go. He had been 
inspector-general of the state and a man rapidly rising to promi- 



GALLANT SOLDIERS. i87 

Colonel Peissner, at the time of his appointment to the command 
of the 119th, was a professor at Union. With Carl Schurz, he was a 
German refugee, coming here after the Revolution of 1848. In 
Schenectady, though driven to humble occupation, his worth was 
discovered and became recognized. A graduate of a German univer- 
sity, he was a man of splendid education. 

His death at Chancellorville was tragically heroic. In the awful 
rout of the Eleventh Corps, Lieutenant-colonel Schwerin, Lieiitenant, 
afterwards Major Charles F. Lewis of this city, in the midst of the 
carnage, standing by the colors, tried to rally the flying men. Peiss- 
ner and Schwerin were killed and Major Lewis shot through the 
arm. Peissner was promoted in death to be brigadier general. 
Lewis slowly recovered and returned to his command to serve 
through the war. The General's and Schwerin's bodies were sent 
back to the Union lines by the Confederate officers who were thrilled 
by the heroism of the three men. 

Billy Horsfall died a heroic death. He had long been a militia 
man when he entered the service. He was beloved by his men, who 
would have followed him everywhere, as his bravery was conspicuous 
from the outset. 

Captain Ned Forrest was a surprise. He came from civil life to 
the regiment just before its Chancellorville campaign. Some jeal- 
ousy was aroused when he joined, but when sick and lame and suf- 
fering he hobbled to the Chancellorville battle ground and led his 
command in fight. Ever after he was the admiration of his men. 
He lived two days after his fatal wound at Dug Gap and met the 
advent of certain death like a hero. 

Lieutenant Lucius Mead, rising from the ranks, had fallen in the 
awful slaiighter at Gettysburg. He was a superb soldier, loving his . 
profession. His early death cut short a career that would have been 
memorable. ' 

Palmer and Ahreets were sad losses. Both were dare-devils in 
bravery. Palmer fell at Gettysburg. Ahreets was surprised by a 
sharpshooter on the march to Atlanta. 

Just after the outbreak of the war, in the summer of 1861, another 
terrific fire broke out in Schenectady. At the site of the downtown 



i88 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

storehouse of Yates & Mynderse, at the foot of Cucumber Alley, 
now Front street continued, was situated the broom manufactory of 
Otis Smith. A workman was repairing the tarred roof. In some 
careless way the pitch became ignited on the northwest corner of the 
building, and the fire ran down to a pile of dried broom corn brush. 
The flames rose at once in tremendous volume and it was about all 
the workman could do to get out of the way in time to save his life. 
A perfect gale was blowing and the alarm was sounded by the usual 
yells and the ringing of the old Dutch bell, followed by those of the 
other churches and the tooting of locomotive whistles, which was 
all the alarm then used. A tremendous conflagration immediately 
resulted, from what an eye witness declares, was the most reckless, 
and almost criminally careless, situation that could be conceived of. 
Urged by the violence of the northwest wind, the flames swallowed 
the dwelling house belonging to Mr. Otis Smith on the corner where 
Mr. Whitmyre's handsome house is now situated, cleaned up all on 
that side of the street north to the bridge, and south swept away 
everything to, and including the house now occupied by Mrs. John 
Barhydt. So rapid and fierce were the flames under the gale that it 
was all people could do to escape with their lives. Great clots of 
fire swept through the air alighting on roofs all over the town. 
Pretty soon there were more citizens on the top of their buildings 
than there were inside, for no house in the path of the wind from 
Washington Avenue east was safe. The flames crossed the avenue 
east and swept every building, from the residence of Hon. J. Teller 
Schoolscraft to a vacant lot where now stands the residence of Mr. 
William C. Vrooman. Some idea of the danger threatening the 
whole city may be obtained from the fact that the present residence 
of Counsellor David Dagget, the large handsome building opposite 
the armory, was ignited. The five volunteer companies were hard at 
work, Albany and Troy were telegraphed to for aid. They promptly 
responded and special trains brought engines. Steam engines were 
a recent invention. One came over at the rate of a mile a minute 
from Troy. It was stationed on Front street connected with one of 
the cisterns, where just now cannot be discovered. The stream was 
directed against the burning building on the corner of Washington 



BURNING OF THE CHURCH. 189 

Avenue and Front Street and it was a revelation to see not only the 
fire washed out at once, but the walls of the building torn to pieces 
by tremendous hydraulic power. There was no water system, only 
cisterns scattered here and there, a volunteer fire department that 
worked heroically, but lacking the admirable system of Chief En- 
gineer Yates and his men of today. 

The panic in the city was terrible. Washington Avenue from 
State to Union streets, became empty. Barns and houses out of the 
apparent path of the fire, were freely opened to shelter the homeless 
and terror-stricken people. 

In the midst of all the excitement, there was a shout among the 
people who had packed every street in the west end of the city. 
There was a reef of fire around the clock in the old Dutch church. 
People were too busy preserving their homes and staying the progress 
of the flames to bother at that time with any church. The question 
between God and mammon was readily settled in the excitement of 
the hour, and the church went. 

It was a grand sight as the old building went to pieces, and was 
viewed with unconcealed joy by the pastor, who had been struggling 
and fighting for a new church for years. People rushed through the 
windows, because the fire descended, and saved the cushions from the 
seats, or stole them, and, with a great crash, the bell, weighing 
nearly two tons, came down making more noise in death than it ever 
did in life. It was a blessing in the disguise of flame, for the present 
beautiful edifice quickly rose upon the spot. 

In this connection a moment's digression. Preserved from church 
to church back to the day of Queen Anne, a deliciously toned bell 
weighing 800 pounds, of such penetrating power that it was said to 
have been heard on a still Sabbath morning on the Helderberg, had 
been the pride and the joy of the congregation. The enormous bell 
that fell and melted in the flames had replaced it. Many a citizen 
well remembers how melodious and silvery were the tones of the 
little 800 pound bell. It might well be silvery because there was an 
immense amount of that metal used in its construction. 

On a summer morning in 1848, the bell sounded muffled, dull and 
unmusical. The sexton went to investip:ate and the bell was found 



I90 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

to be cracked. Why it was not re-cast cannot now be found out. 
The writer is unable to find a reason from any of the old inhabi- 
tants. It was melted up into little bells for the service of the tea 
table and distributed among- the congregation, and these little 
mementoes are held as of priceless value in many houses in this 
city. 

The pecuniary damage was heavy, but not so enormous as to cause 
any serious loss, except the manufactory of Mr. Smith, which was 
one of the largest industries of its kind in the Mohawk valley. 
$120,000 would cover the entire loss. 



CHAPTER XIX. 
The Close of the Nineteenth Century. 

The close of the war found the city very lethargic and its growth 
was slow. In the early fifties, attention had been attracted to the 
fact there was no more room for burials in the city and a cemetery 
was demanded. On Green street, running back to Front, and about 
200 feet along both streets, was the old Dutch burial ground in a 
shamefully neglected condition. There was really no room for more 
dead. The coffins in the little family plots had been piled one upon 
another. There was no shade or foliage in the desolate place. 
Graves had fallen in, making horrible cavities ; mounds had been 
heaped up again and again. Tombstones and monuments had been 
heaved and tossed in all directions or tumbled over by the action of 
the frost and the elements. The subject of a new resting place for 
the dead was discussed in the papers. 

Far beyond the compact part of the city was a beautiful glen, 
that at the early part of the century was the best partridge feeding 
and homing ground anywhere near here. After long dispute, the 
Vale, as it was called and known, was selected. It was purchased 



THE OLD CEMETERY. 191 

by a cemetery association of which the late Edward Rosa was the 
moving spirit. The lovely brook was halted into a succession of 
miniature lakes and the whole ground laid out and formally opened 
and dedicated in 1857. 

It was continually enlarged by the purchase of adjacent territory 
but not fast enough to meet the d'imands of death. It has grown 
grandly in beauty with a sad increase in population, until the sleepers 
in the City of the Dead, that, but for the recent tremendous growth 
of the town, would soon outnumber the bustling living in city 
beneath. Meanwhile the town has in the tremendous advance of the 
last two decades grown all around it and the city is looking around 
again for some new territory to people with the fast increasing pro- 
cession going to join the great majority. This time it will be far 
away for prosperity, so called, will march close behind. But wher- 
ever the new dormitory of the forever silent is placed, it will never 
equal in loveliness the Vale cemetery of to-day. 

In 1857, in the slow advancement of the city, it was decreed that 
a new street, the continuation of Lafayette, from Liberty to Union, 
should be opened. It was all pasture land, with here and there a 
scattered little shop or outbuilding in the way of the improvement. 
In excavating and grading for the new street, midway of the improve- 
ment begun, to the astonishment of everybody, the workmen to turn 
up skulls and skeletons, faded remnants of blue and buff cloth, here 
and there an old sword and bayonet. About the whole city rushed 
to the spot, and the constabulary of the town, and a poor little gang 
it was, were called upon to keep the crowd back and restrain the 
relic seekers from carrying away ghastly mementoes. The " oldest " 
inhabitant was on hand, in fact he was very much in evidence. It 
was soon learned that the spot had been occupied as a hospital and 
soldier burial ground in the Revolution. The remains, found to be 
those of about fifty-seven men, were gathered and given a military 
funeral and with patriotic pomp and ceremony, laid away in the 
new cemetery. 

But a terrible and shocking innovation was on its way to just about 
break the hearts of the survivors of the dear old Dutch. Holland is 
unsurpassed by any nationality on earth in the reverence of its 



192 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

people for their dead. The inscription of Shakespeare on his own 
gravestone : 

'' Good friend for Jesus' sake forbear, 
To dig the dust lies buried here," 

was his creed and his love and sentiment stood a fierce guard around 
the old Dutch graveyard in Green street. 

Yet it had to go. The plague spot could no longer be endured. 
Its horrible fertility grew hideous weeds ; its suggestive hillocks and 
pits were eyesores and heartaches ; it was dark and rank and noi- 
some. So it steamed in the hot dews and showers of summer with 
miasma and malaria. Its great mounds heaped up over the piled up 
coffins beneath, had become so many fortresses behind which disease 
crouched, its sunken graves rifle pits from which death levelled an 
unseen bullet. At least so said the men of science and science was 
beginning to have its way. 

The Dutch Church caused a bill to be introduced in the legisla- 
ture giving it the power to remove the dead and sell the land. It 
was bitterly fought, combatted before committee with wrath and vio- 
lence, eloquence, pathos and tears. 

But the wrath was unheeded, the eloquence went to pieces against 
the wall of horse sense, and stern necessity, pathos and tears, heart- 
lessly pooh-poohed and the bill passed. Abundant opportunity was 
given for the removal of the family dead, provision generously made 
for the short, second journey of the unknown, or the bodies of those 
whom poverty or indifference threw upon the hands of the carriers 
of the dead, and in the fall of 1879 the yard was cleared and the 
sleepers, who made no objection all this while, were taken away to 
lie with their children, or in the place set apart for them in the State 
street .side of the cemeter}\ 

A marvellous sight it was to see the dead thus arise. To the 
honor of our humanity, be it remembered, that all irreverence was 
hushed and the least exhibition of its tendency frowned promptly 
down. Burials in the enclosure had been prohibited for many years 
and no unpleasant results of exhumation were obser\^able. Families 
watched as the spade invaded the shekinah of the dooryards and 



PROJECT OF A NEW DEPOT. 193 

thresholds of their imforgotten dead. The secrets of the graves, 
closed in the morning of one century, to be opened in the afternoon 
of the next, were eagerl}^ awaited. It was all skeleton. But here 
and there a wedding ring, still traceable, often yellow with the truth 
of solid gold, coffin plates untraceable but- easily restored. Indians 
with beads and traces of wampum and hair well preserved, tied with 
the ribbons that loving hands had fastened. So, with the hush of 
expectancy, the long breath of surprise sometimes with sobs and 
tears, the dead were carefully lifted and borne away to another — it is 
hoped, a lasting home. 

Almost simultaneously, an assault was made upon the depot. 
Negotiations were opened by the promoters of the project for a new 
one with the Central authorities who had solicited assistance. The 
trouble came over the closing of Liberty street. The railroad author- 
ities declared they could not build or accommodate their passengers 
unless this was done. The battle was fierce, bitter and long. The 
Hon. John W. Veeder was then Member of Assembly. The ordi- 
nance passed the common council and a bill permitting the city to 
close the street, was introduced in the legislature. The Central sent 
a beautiful painting of the proposed structure and its approaches, to 
be exhibited in the window of the Wilson Davis store. Before the 
building was begun, the common council changed its mind and 
called upon Mr. Veeder to withdraw the bill. At the office of A. A. 
Yates, who was urging the passage of the measure, there gathered 
merchants and men of property representing the business and pos- 
session of millions. Mr. Veeder, a man with the courage of his 
convictions, did not need the backing but it was welcome, and he 
promptly passed the bill and the building arose about as handsome a 
structure as any way station on the line. It was thought then 
ample enough to meet all possible future contingencies but • it is 
inadequate at times for the needs of trains in these booming days. 

The Hon. J. W. Clute, one of the most fearless and progressive 
mayors we have ever had, has been of infinite service in the estab- 
lishment of tablets commemorative of scenes in the history of this, 
one of the most historic cities of the United States. But a great 
oversiofht has been committed in the failure to mark the site where 



194 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



stood the scene of Schenectady's later martyrdom and to place a slab 
on the spot of the obliterated stigma of the old depot. The new 
depot was completed in 1882. 



CHAPTER XX. 



The New City. 



Straightway upon its completion, the city fairly bounded. It 
seemed as if the hands of the builders had rolled away a stone from 
the sepulchre door and dead progress had come to life. The old 
Clute foundry had long ceased to do much of anything, and thus 
passed out of the world of business the marine builders whose work 
is historic. The more sightly and modern arcade took its place, 
Wall street remodeled its business shanties and the Maxons built hand- 
somely. The Givens tavern went down, the stately edifice of the 
Edison rising grandly in its place. Isha Banker's shop passed out of 
memory, and the shabby little restaurant vexed the eye and tortured 
the palate no more forever. 

Then in 1888, came a corporation, destined to call to Schenectady 
the attention of the whole scientific and mechanical world, and in 
time, to crowd the city to congestion with the highest grade of 
skilled labor and the most eminent men. It was a new motive power, 
the science of the lightning. 

The Jones Car Works, coming here from Green Island, had failed 
and gone into the hands of a receiver. It had built a respectable 
plant on the present site of the tremendous works of the General 
Electric. Under the direction of the court, its real estate was for 
sale. The Hon. John DeRemer, the receiver, obtained an order 
from the court for the sale of the property for #45,000. The atten- 
tion of the Edison Machine Works of Goerck street, New York City, 
was attracted to it and negotiations were entered into. The com- 



AN IMMENSE INDUSTRY. 195 

pany, then by no means a very large corporation, examined the situ- 
ation and were struck with its advantages. Its directors discovered 
that they could not get in New York what they needed. Here then, 
were railroads and canal connection with all points of the compass, 
at the very doors of their shops, and opportunities for experimental 
work along the bank of the canal that were unequalled anywhere. 
But they would give but $37,500 for the whole outfit. The citizens 
took hold of the matter and private and personal subscription soon 
made up the $45,000. John Kruesi as general manager, William B. 
Turner, familiarly and popularly known as " Pop," William E. Gil- 
more, as secretary, took charge of the business. John Kruesi was a 
benefaction to Schenectady. While rigidly a business man, he was 
considerate and just with his employees, warm-hearted and sympa- 
thetic, in a remarkable degree. He died here at his post, universally 
beloved and regretted. Under the original management, the indus- 
try grew, daily increasing its output enormously and bringing work 
and workmen to the town till it began to be thronged with new 
faces and infused with new blood. A connection was formed with 
the Thompson and Houston, an immense plant in Lynn, Mass., and 
Orange, New Jersey. The works doubled, Edison himself took Gil- 
more away to be his right hand man. "Pop" Turner went to 
Chicago on his own hook, and after suffering a terrible affliction in 
the loss of a beloved wife, John Kruesi was taken away from us, for 
he had become one of us long before he left us. 

But his admirable management has continued. The works are 
advancing with tremendous speed toward the position of the great- 
est manufacturing corporation in America, if not of the world. 

But the great corporation three years ago had abundant evidence 
of the appreciation of Schenectady. The managers of the new 
corporation, known as the General Electric Company, desired to close 
the street known as Kruesi avenue. Immediately, on the very com- 
mencement of the establishment in this city, gin mills and beer shops 
were banked up against doorways and gateways of the works until 
the employe could with difficulty leave the scene of his labor for the 
rest of his home without stumbling across the threshold of a "joint." 
The great manufactory, like all others, to their credit be it spoken. 



196 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

does not want temptation too near their men. So it established its 
own restaurant inside its own works and wanted to close np the 
avenue in the edge of their premises. Besides they needed the land. 
Promptly the city, called " Old Dorp," ridiculed for its lack of public 
spirit, came to the rescue. Thirty thousand dollars were promptly 
raised by subscription, the street purchased and given to the General 
Electric, the gift guarded only by the proviso that if the plant 
removed the property was to revert to the subscribers to the fund. 
The corporation is showing its appreciation of the generosity of this 
people. It has contributed $15,000 to the new library and it is to do 
still more when the occasion comes. 

Meanwhile, this is the status of the General Electric at this time. 
Before the publication of this work, these figures will be greatly 
increased. A large office building is in course of erection which will 
cost in the neighborhood of $200,000, and when finished will be the 
largest office building in the world. As an evidence of the mon- 
strous increase of their business we give the following figures : 

January 31st, 1897, , .$11,170,319 

" 1898, 14,431,342 

" 1899, - - - - - 17,431,327 

" " 1900, 26,323,626 

" 190I) 27,969,541 

Of which the Schenectady works received sixty per cent. 

The total number of employes in April, 1901, were as follows : 
In the oflfice, managers and clerks, 496; draughtsmen, 386; employees, 
6,769 ; total, 7,651. Their pay roll is $100,000 a week. 

Since writing the above, the employees have increased in nvimber 
to over 10,000, and a million and a half dollars worth of new build- 
ings are under contract, while the present pay roll amounts to nearly 
$150,000, and the end is not yet. The city increases so rapidly that 
the writer cannot keep up with it. 

But giving employment to this vast multitude is not their only 
benefaction. Before that bluff and outspoken, but able manager, 
William B. Turner left, he built us a street railroad, extending at 
first from Brandywine Avenue to the end of Campbell Avenue in 



THE LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. 197 

Bellevue. It was opened with speeches in the park in 1887. The 
drivers and condnctors were green, the horses new to the business. 
The horses tried to run away but could not, the weight was too 
great. The drivers could not hold them and the cars more than 
once were dragged from the tracks and bounded over the cobbles- 
Unused to the sight, runaways were common. But the people 
cheered and the road settled down to business, staggering along for 
some years, until to-day, Engineer Fraser, one of the most indefatiga- 
ble and capable railroad managers in the country, is gridironing the 
city with a system of electric railway that for convenience, comfort 
and elegance of equipment is unsurpassed in the state. 

Meanwhile, the Schenectady Locomotive Works, that right bower 
of Schenectady for half a century, that in adverse hard times has 
kept its men at work with heavy loss, has also immensely increased 
its output. It is employing about 8,000 men, more heads of families, 
and owners of homes than any other local corporation. It is, in 
addition to its immense establishment, building the largest shop in 
the United States. Its machinery is a wonder, its appliances the 
last triumphs of modern invention, its locomotives pounding the 
iron all over the round earth, and being turned out at the rate of one 
and a half a day. 

The effect of all this on the Ancient City is marvellous. The 
census of 1890 showed 19,000 population ; of 1900 nearly 32,000. 
The letters received and sent from the post office are four times as 
many as in President Arthur's time. The mail matter of the Gene- 
ral Electric alone is larger than that of the whole city in 1880 and 
that of Wallis T. Hanson & Co., is' as large as that of the former. 
Mont Pleasant, Edison Park, Villa Road, Bellevue, Scotia and the 
General Electric itself, are now within the city limits. It is safe to 
say that nearly 60,000 people live within reach of the postal facilities 
of the city. The police census of the city in 1902 gives within a 
few hundreds of 50,000 population. It is an astounding progress. 
It is indeed an " Electric City." 

As an instance of the marvellous growth of the city, the beautiful 
grove directly east of Union College land, through which have ram- 

14 



198 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

bled the sons of Union, whose names have since gone aronnd the 
world, has been purchased b}^ the Schenectady Realty Co. Fifteen 
years ago the city had scarcely reached the College ground, and here 
is a new village, begun less than two years before the publication of 
this work, covering many acres of land laid out by the best of land- 
scape engineers. Decorated with the finest architecture it has cre- 
ated a suburban village, equal in extent and population to the size 
of the hamlet in the seventeenth century. 



CHAPTER XXI. 



Police. 



In the early history of Schenectady, before it was incorporated as 
a city, it devolved upon the justices of the peace, appointed by the 
governor, to see that peace and order were maintained, and they had 
power to appoint certain persons whose duty it was to arrest and 
report to the justices all offenders against the laws. 

In 1788, a law was passed by the legislature giving the justices of 
the peace authority to appoint six night watchmen and an officer 
from the citizens residing in the township of Schenectady south- 
ward from the Mohawk river and not more than three-quarters of a 
mile from the Dutch church. These persons so selected were 
required to keep watch and guard in their turn in such manner and 
time as the justices directed. Only one watchman was on duty at a 
time. The justices prescribed the rules and regulations to govern 
the watchmen, and a fine was imposed on any officer neglecting his 
duty. This was the first regular police service instituted at Sche- 
nectady. 

This manner of appointing night watchmen was repealed when 
the charter of Schenectady was adopted. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 199 

In the act incorporating the city of Schenectady, passed March 
26th, 1798, the common conncil was given power to designate the 
nnmber of constables to be elected in each ward. From, and up to 
the present date, one constable was elected in each ward, and to them 
was given the same powers in criminal actions now possessed by the 
policemen. There was no regular salary attached to this office. 
The only pay received for services consisted of regularly prescribed 
fees. 

June 17th, 1 81 7, the number of night watchmen was increased to 
eight. They were appointed by the common council and were 
placed under the direction of two superintendents, also appointed by 
the common council. The superintendents had entire supervision of 
the watchmen, prescribing the rules and regulations governing them 
and the time each should serve. Only two watchmen were on duty 
at a time. When on patrol, the watchmen carried a staff five feet 
long, and were obliged to be on duty from nine o'clock in the even- 
ing until daybreak. At every hour of the night, they announced, in 
an audible voice, the time. These officers were required to main- 
tain the peace and see that the laws were enforced and obeyed. A 
watchhouse was provided for the imprisonment of all offenders 
against the law. 

March loth, 1815, a law was passed by the legislature, creating a 
board of magistrates, consisting of two men selected by the common 
council from the aldermen or justices of the peace, who were empow- 
ered to attend to the relief of the poor and to punish petty offenses 
committed within the city limits. They were required to receive 
the report of the night watchmen every morning and to proceed to 
the examination of all persons apprehended by the watchmen. The 
common council selected one or more constables, called police con- 
stables, who were required to serve all warrants, summonses and pro- 
cesses by the board of magistrates. These constables were expected 
to arrest and report all offenders against the laws and ordinances of 
the city, and bring such persons for trial before the board, which had 
jurisdiction similar to the present police justices. The magistrates 
were allowed an annual salary of one hundred and fifty dollars, and 
the constables fifty dollars. 



200 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

About 1830 a high constable was chosen by the common council, 
pursuant to an act of the legislature. He represented the entire 
city, and had jurisdiction over criminal matters such as is now exer- 
cised by the chief of police. His term of office was limited to one 
year. The high constable and ward constables continued to exercise 
their police powers in the maintenance of peace and order until the 
Capital police force was organized in 1867. 

March 28th, 1842, the office of police justice was created by an 
act of the legislature, which provided that the board of supervisors 
should appoint one of the justices of the peace of the city to attend to 
complaints, examinations and trials of a criminal nature. April ist, 
of the following year, another act of the legislature was passed, pro- 
viding that the police justice should be appointed by the governor, 
with the consent of the senate, and that his terms of office should 
be for three years. March 31st, 1848, another act was passed pro- 
viding that the office of police justice, high constable and four jus- 
tices of the peace should be elective officers. The term of police 
justice was extended to four years and that of high constable and 
justices of the peace to three years. 

April 22, 1865, a law was passed by the legislature creating the 
city of Albany and the several adjoining towns a district known as 
the Capital police district of the State of New York. This act pro- 
vided that three commissioners and two advisory commissioners of 
Capital police should be appointed by the governor, with the consent 
of the senate. To these commissioners, called a police board, was 
intrusted the appointment of superintendents, captains, sergeants 
and patrolmen, and had the entire supervision of all matters relating 
to the police government of the district. April 10, 1866, by an act 
of the legislature, the Capital police district was extended so as to 
embrace the city of Schenectady, which city was limited to the ser- 
vice of seven patrolmen, at an annual salary of $500 each, to be 
paid out of the contributions of the city to the Capital police fund. 
A. W. Hunter of this city, was appointed police commissioner for 
the city. 

It seems that the passage of this act was not done in response to 
the wishes of the people of this city, for the following year the 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 201 

board of supervisors passed a resolution condemning the passage of 
the act, and asking for its appeal. But nothing was done in this 
direction beyond remonstrating against it, and this system of police 
protection remained in force till the passage of the act to organize 
and establish a police for the city of Schenectady, April 15th, 1870. 

The passage of this act provided for the election of two police 
commissioners by the people, who, in conjunction with the mayor, 
should constitute a police board, having the general charge of all 
matters pertaining to the police force. These commissioners are 
elected for two years, and perform their duties without compensation. 
The act creating them provides that they shall select not more than 
ten policemen, whose term of service shall continue during good 
behavior and capacity to perform the duties required. The pay of 
policemen is fixed by the commissioners, and cannot be less than 
$500 nor more than $800 per annum. A chief of police and an 
assistant chief are selected from the ten members composing the 
force by the board. The chief of police, under the direction of the 
board, is the chief executive officer of the police department, and is 
obliged to keep a book of records of proceedings in his department, 
and all the services rendered by himself and the several policemen. 
During the absence of the police justice, the chief possesses the 
power of that officer to entertain complaints for criminal offences, 
and to issue warrants for the arrest of persons charged with criminal 
actions. The salary of the chief of police is fixed by the police 
board, when approved by the common council, and cannot be less 
than $500 nor more than $1,200 per year. 

The present police commissioners are-: Mayor Horace Van Voast, 
Merritt Hammond and Fred D. Cherry ; chief of police, William ly. 
Campbell. 

When the first police force was organized under the Capital Police 
system, the city furnished a station house in Wall street, near Devine's 
hotel. Here were provided suitable cells for the confinement of 
prisoners until final disposition was made of them before the police 
justice. A police court was arranged on the second floor, over the 
police station. 



202 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

This building was used for this purpose until the completion of 
the present city hall, a present from the Hon. William K. Teller, in 
1881. Here commodious apartments are provided for police court, 
police justices' offices, office of chief of police, sleeping apartments 
for patrolmen and cells for the confinement of prisoners. 

Frederick Eisenminger, police justice, was appointed by the com- 
mon council, May 2, 1882, and elected to the same office for four 
years, in April, 1883. He is chairman of the board of magistrates 
to distribute relief to the poor. He has held office ever since. 

William L. Campbell, chief of police, has been a police officer 
here since August 3, 1869. He has served the city faithfully, and 
from the accounts kept in his office, records back to 1798 can be 
traced. He is still in office. 



CHAPTER XXII. 



The Fire Department. 



Before Schenectady was incorporated as a city, the means for the 
extinguishment of fires were limited to the use of leather buckets. 
Each dwelling was supplied with as many as the authorities pre- 
scribed. Every able-bodied citizen, in case of fire, was obliged to" 
render all the assistance within his power, and any refusal so to do 
was an offense against the safety of the inhabitants, deemed worthy 
of a fine, and, in certain cases, imprisonment. The first law passed 
by the legislature, relating to protection from fires in Schenectady, 
was on March i, 1788. This act provided that the justices of the 
peace should select from the inhabitants living south of the Mohawk 
river, and not more than three-quarters of a mile from the Dutch 
church, twenty able-bodied citizens to act as firemen, such persons to 
have the care and management of all fire apparatus and to render 
assistance at fires. The justices made and established the rules 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 203 

and regulations governing the firemen, and had power to remove 
any fireman for disobeying them. The persons appointed under this 
act probably constituted the first regular fire company ever .organ- 
ized in this city. 

The first date we find any reference made to fire engines was in 
1797. September nth of this year, the trustees of Schenectady, at 
a regular meeting, directed by resolution, that a letter be sent to 
Alexander Ellice, London, England, directing him to purchase two 
fire engines, one large one at a cost of one hundred and twenty 
guineas, and a small house engine at a cost of twenty guineas. These 
engines were soon after obtained and used for many years. They 
were operated by hand and were small and crude affairs even com- 
pared with the hand engines used at a later date. The larger of 
these two engines was about eight or ten feet in length, between 
three and four feet wide, and stood three feet high. The condensing 
case, inclosing the works, was placed in the center of the machine, 
considerably higher than the main portion of the case. On the top 
was an elbow or " goose neck," to which, when the engine was at 
work, was attached a pipe, through which the stream of water was 
directed upon the flames. As this engine had no suction, it was sup- 
plied by means of buckets, the water being drawn from neighboring 
wells, carried to and emptied into the engine through an aperture in 
the side of the box, so as not to interfere with the working of the 
engine. This box held many gallons of water. The arms or pump- 
ing handles were placed fore and aft, working lengthwise of the box, 
the bows striking on the ends ; and, when full manned, four men 
could work on each arm, making eight in all. Such were the 
engines in use at this time, which were considered instruments of 
utility and beauty. 

When Schenectady was incorporated as a city, there were two fire 
companies, the members of which were appointed by the mayor and 
common council. At this period, and for a number of years after, 
it was a duty incumbent upon the mayor and aldermen to attend fires 
and give personal supervision to the work of the firemen. Indeed, 
at this time, the city magistrates performed the same services in later 
years delegated to the chief engineer and his assistants. 



204 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

May 1 2th, 1798, an ordinance was passed by the common council, 
which provided that two persons should be appointed for each ward, 
called inspectors, who were required at certain times in each month 
to inspect the dwelling's in their respective wards and ascertain if 
proper precaution was taken to guard against fire, and to make a 
report to the aldermen of the condition of the buildings in the ward 
as to their safety from fire. This ordinance contained many regu- 
lations respecting the necessary things to be done by property owners 
for the prevention of fires, and any citizen whose dwelling did not 
comply with these regulations, who was reported by the inspectors, had 
a limited time to remedy such defect. If he failed to do so he was 
fined. 

In 1798 a company was organized called the Fire Bag Company. 
To this company was principally entrusted the work of removing 
personal property from buildings exposed to danger by fire, to places 
of safety. Such property, when removed, they were expected to 
guard and protect from loss by thieves until it should be taken care 
of by the owners. This company consisted of twenty-one members. 
The first members were : David Tomlinson, Jeremiah Van Rens- 
selaer, Gilbert R. Livingston, James Murdock, Jonathan Walton, 
George Leslie, William N. Lighthall, Dorcey Jones, James I. Hoyt, 
William J. Teller, Lawrence Van Baskerk, Dow Clute, James Ander- 
son, Robert Wendell, Samuel Thorn, Luther Halsey, James Adair, 
Andrew M. Farlan, Abraham Van Ingen, Henry Yates, Jr., William 
Corlett. 

In 1798 the fire limits were defined as extending one mile due 
north from the northwest corner of Union College building, thence 
due west one mile, thence south two miles, thence east two miles, 
thence north two miles, thence east two miles, thence north two 
miles, thence west to the place of beginning, two miles. 

The charter of the city of Schenectady, as amended April 2, 18 13, 
provided that not more than eighty able-bodied freeholders should be 
selected by the common council from the two wards of the city 
to act as firemen, who should have the care and management of the 
engines and tools provided for the extinguishment of fires, which 
persons were to be called the firemen of the city of Schenectady. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 205 

The fire district at this time extended from the south side of the 
Mohawk river, and not more than three-quarters of a mile from the 
site of the present First Reformed Dutch Church. 

The first hook and ladder company was formed in 1814, and con- 
sisted of ten members. This company was provided with the 
necessary apparatus by the city and was under the supervision of a 
captain and an assistant appointed by the common council. 

In 1 8 14 a company was organized called the Ax Men. It con- 
sisted of two members under the same supervision as the hook and 
ladder company. Each man was provided with an ax, and expected 
to cut down fences and buildings where necessary to check the 
spread of fire. 

The first superintendent of firemen was appointed in 18 14. To 
this officer was not only intrusted the general supervision of the fire- 
men at fires, but he was required to see that the engines and all other 
apparatus were kept in proper working order. His duties were some- 
what similar to those imposed upon the present chief engineer. 

In 18 15 there were four fire companies in the city, exclusive of the 
hook and ladder and ax men. They were designated as Nos. i, 2, 3 
and 4. Company No. i had quarters near the present stores of John 
Clement ; No. 2 near the corner of Front and Ferry streets ; No. 3 
a few doors below the residence of the late Edward Walker, on 
Liberty street ; No. 4. near the location of the present John J. Camp- 
bell Hose house. Each one of these companies had fire engines at 
this date. The engine purchased in England in 1797, was still in 
use, and the other engines though larger, were similar in construc- 
tion. 

The laws of the city were very strict in regard to the duty of citi- 
zens at time of a fire in these days. Every able-bodied citizen was 
pressed into service, and it was no uncommon sight to see a line of 
men nearly a quarter of a mile long, standing in a close line, reach- 
ing from the nearest point where water could be obtained, to the 
engine, passing buckets of water from one to the other, to supply 
the engine with water. Even women at times, were engaged in this 
work. A fine was imposed on any citizen who refused to perform 
such work when requested to do so by the city magistrate. 



2o6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

From pictures of the larger engines used at this date, we see 
simply a long tank or box placed upon wheels. On each side of the 
tank was a long arm or handle extending the entire length of the 
tank, which worked on the principle of a pump-handle. At a time 
of fire this engine was drawn as hear as possible to the scene of 
destruction, the tank was filled with water, and then, by means 
of the pump, the water was forced from the tank through a hose. 
About thirty men could work at the pump of the largest engines. 
Although there was much labor, requiring a large force of men, 
attending the use of these early engines, they did good service and 
prevented any extensive conflagration until the year 1819, when, not- 
withstanding the most strenuous efforts of our firemen, spoken of at that 
time in the most praiseworthy manner, the entire lower portion of 
our city was destroyed. 

The Teapot. — There are those living who can remember the 
small engine used at this date (18 15), and for many years after, by 
the members of Company No. 3. It was a small engine, called the 
" Teapot," on account of its appearance. It was simply a tank, 
with a pump attached, capable of being carried when full of water 
by four men. It was of great service at a fire, often being carried 
into a burning building and doing excellent work where the larger 
engines could not be used. This engine was used for many years. 

Double Deck Engine. — In 1825 the common council purchased 
the first double deck engine ever used in this city. It was given in 
charge of Company 4, and was something of a wonder at this time. 
It was purchased from a firm in Philadelphia, It was larger than 
the other engines in use in the city, but worked on the same princi- 
ple. The two decks made it possible for more men to work at the 
pumps, and thus more force was given the water. Some of the fire- 
men of this period who are now living, claim that this engine could 
throw a stream of water even higher than the modern steam engines. 

Fire Wardens. — In 1825 five fire wardens were appointed, who 
had supervision over the buildings erected in the fire district, as to 
the regulations to be observed under the laws of the city relating to 
safety from fires. The first fire wardens were : Isaac S. Miller, Ben- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 207 

jamin M. Mumford, John Van Voast, Nicholas Van Vranken and 
George McQueen. 

Incorporation of the Fire Department of the City. — April 21st, 
1828, a law was passed by the legislature constituting all persons 
belonging to the several fire companies a body politic, under the 
name of " The Fire Department of the City of Schenectady." This 
act provided that each company of firemen should choose two repre- 
sentatives, who should select a president and vice-president, and out of 
the whole body of firemen, three trustees, a treasurer, secretary and 
a collector. The first representatives were George McQueen, John 
Van Voast, Richard F, Ward, Myndert Van Guysling, Cornelius L. 
Barhydt, Henry Peek, Robert Osborne and Peter Bradt. The first 
president was George McQueen ; the first vice-president, John Van 
Voast ; the first trustees, Joseph Mynderse, Jacob DeForest, Jr., and 
Harmanus W. Peek ; the first secretary, Joseph Mynderse, and the 
first collector, Richard F. Ward. 

The trustees managed the affairs and disposed of the funds of the 
corporation according to the by-laws, rules and regulations of the 
corporation. By this act, the time of incorporation was extended to 
April ist, 1848, and the firemen were granted all the rights and priv- 
ileges then extended by law to the firemen of the city of New York. 

First Hose Company. — In 1830 the first hose company was formed 
for the purpose of attending to the hose of the fire companies, but in 
1834 it was disbanded and converted into a supply company of 
twelve members. The members of this company were expected to 
supply the engines with water, but, a few years later, the purchase of 
suction engines did away with this work, and the company was 
disbanded. 

The First Suction Engine. — iVbout the year 1836 three suction 
engines were purchased by the city for the use of the fire depart- 
ment. Two were called the Seeley engines ; the other was known 
as the Button engine. Both were constructed at Rochester. 

These engines were a great improvement over those heretofore 
used by the firemen. They were hand engines, but did away with 
the laborious and difficult task of supplying the engines with water 
by the use of buckets. 



2o8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The first three engines bought were given to Companies Nos i, 2 and 
4. A few years later a similar engine was purchased for Company 
No. 3. These engines were successfully used until the steam engines 
came into general use many years after. 

The First Chief Engineer. — September i6th, 1836, the common 
council passed a law creating the office of chief engineer of the fire 
department. In December of the same year the offices of first and 
second engineers were created. 

The first chief engineer was Richard F. Ward. The first assistant 
engineers were John C. Burnham and James E. Van Horn. 

These officers were subject to the direction of the fire wardens, 
but the firemen received their orders through the chief and his assis- 
tants. September 2, 1846, the chief and his assistants were given 
exclusive authority to direct the action of all firemen. 

Act of Incorporation of 1862. — April 2, 1862, an act was passed 
by the legislature incorporating all persons belonging to the several 
fire companies in a body politic, by the title of " The Fire Depart- 
ment of the City of Schenectady," for the term of thirty years. 
With a few changes, this act is similar to the act of incorporation of 
1828. 

First Steam Fire Engine. — The first steam fire engine was pur- 
chased at Portland, Maine, by the city, February 14th, 1864, for 
$5,000, but was not received and accepted until the following year. 
It was named the A. W. Hunter engine, in honor of the presiding 
mayor at that time. It was placed in engine house No. 4, upon its 
arrival, and is still used for the extinguishment of fires. The first 
engineer was John Schermerhorn ; assistant engineer, Jeremiah Ten- 
broeck ; fireman, Vedder Peters. The salary of the fireman was 
fixed at $500 a year, and that of the engineer at $100. In 1867 
another steam fire engine was purchased for No. 3 engine house, 
called the Andrew McMullen steamer, and in 1869, a steamer for 
No. 1 engine house, called the A. A. Van Voast. Thomas Carroll 
was appointed engineer of steamer No. 3, and John J. Hart for 
steamer No. i. 

These three steamers were used until the year 1872, when the 
completion of the Schenectady water works, and the arrangements 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 209 

made with this company for supplying the city with water for the 
extinguishment of fires, made their use unnecessary. Steamers 
Andrew McMullen and A. A. Van Voast were withdrawn from ser- 
vice immediately and subsequently sold. Steamer No. i (A. W. 
Hunter), was retained and is still used. 

In 1872, in consequence of the adoption of the new system of fire 
protection, the entire fire department was reorganized by the com- 
mon council. Companies Nos. i, 3 and 4 were disbanded, but soon 
after reorganized. Company No. i, which retained the steamer A. 
W. Hunter, was the first to be enrolled. Companies Nos. 3 and 4 
were soon after reorganized as hose companies. A hose depot was 
established this year in the building used by Company No. i. and 
has been used ever since for such purpose. 

Superintendent of Hose. — In 1872 the office of superintendent of 
hose was established. James W. Clute was the first superintendent 
appointed. The present incumbent is John H. Shaffer. This 
officer is obliged to inspect, and keep all the hose used by the 
department in serviceable condition, to keep the steamer in running 
order, and to accompany and regulate it when its use is required. 

The history of the volunteer fire department, from the incorpora- 
tion of this city to the present time, has ever been a credit to the 
city and an honor to the men who composed it. 

Schenectady has been remarkably free from any extensive con- 
flagration in many years, and credit for this fact can be attributed 
solely to the self-sacrificing spirit, intelligent labor and praiseworthy 
exertions of its firemen. The present efficient force ' has been ever 
ready to respond to the call of duty, and by zealous united efforts 
has saved much valuable property. 

History of the different fire companies. — The first year from which 
we can get a connected history of the different fire companies 
organized in this city is 1824. 

Following will be found the history of each company since 1824 
not previously mentioned, down to the present time : 

Company No. i. — From 1824 to 1858, when it was disbanded, this 
company was known simply as Engine Company No. i. It was 
reorganized in 1858 with twenty members, under the name of Protec- 



2IO SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

tion Hose Company No. i, and retained this name until it was dis- 
banded, by order of the common council, September 24th, 1872. It 
was reorganized with twenty-eight members September 27, 1876, as 
Ellis Hose Company No. i. It disbanded May 2, 1886, but reor- 
ganized two days from this date as Protection Hose Company No. i. 
This company is still in existence. 

Company No. 2. — From 1824 to May 16, 1855, this company was 
known as Engine Company No. 2. It was reorganized March 4, 
1857, ^s the Deluge Company No. 2. It subsequently disbanded 
and did not reorganize until 1873, when it assumed the name of Van 
Vranken Hose Company. 

Company No. 3. — This company, from 1824 to 1835, when it was 
disbanded, was called Engine Company No. 3. March 1 8th, 183 5, it was 
reorganized, but a few years after disbanded. March 3, 1857, it was 
reorganized as Niagara Company, No. 3, which name it retained to 
October 9, 1867, when it was reorganized with twenty-seven mem- 
bers, as Rosa Hose Company No. 3. It was disbanded by the com- 
mon council, September 24th, 1872, and reorganized with thirty- 
three members, January loth, 1876, as the Cain Hose Company No. 3. 
It disbanded September i6th, 1879, and reorganized October 14th, 
1879, as Neptune Hose Company No. 3. 

Company No. 4. — From 1824 to December 15th, 1847, this com- 
pany was known as Engine Company No. 4. It was disbanded in 
1847, ^^d reorganized January ist, 1848, and again disbanded May 
2, 1856. It was reorganized August i6th, 1856. October 6th, 1857, 
the name was changed to Neptune Hose Company No. 4. June i6th) 
1867, it was reorganized with twenty-eight members, as the Hatha- 
way Hose Company No. 4. September 24th, 1872, it was disbanded 
by the common council, but immediately reorganized with nineteen 
members,, as the Stanford Hose Company. May 3d, 1876, it was 
again disbanded, and reorganized with twenty-five members, June 
13th, 1876, as the J. D. Campbell Hose Company. 

Company No. 5. — This company was organized with thirty-six 
members, November i8th, 1835. It at one time was the Mohawk 
Hose Company. August 28th, i860, it was disbanded, and not reor- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 21 r 

ganized until July 21st, 1876, when it was called the E. W. Paige 
Hose Company. 

Company No. 6. — This company was organized with forty-eight 
members, November 20th, 1838, and existed for many years, when it 
was disbanded. January 14th, 1878, it was reorganized with thirty 
members, as the J. S. Myers Hose Company. It disbanded in 
1881, and reorganized March 13th, 1884, with nineteen members, as 
the Elmer Ellis Hose Company. 

Ax, Hook and Ladder Company. — The first ax, hook and ladder 
company was organized in 18 14, and continued to exist until dis- 
banded, June 5th, 1856, but was reorganized on the same date. It 
was disbanded August 17th, i860. 

July 8th, 1862, Hook and Ladder Company No. i was organized 
with fifty-five members, and continued in the service to December 
24th, 1867, when it was disbanded, since which time another com- 
pany has been reorganized and is now existing. 

F'ire Guards. — A company called the Fire Guards was organized 
September 6th, 1836, from the supply company, which disbanded at 
that time. The F'ire Guards disbanded August 5th, 1845, and have 
never been reorganized. 

Eagle Hose Company. — A company called the Eagle Hose Com- 
pany was organized from the members of the Fire Guards, August 
5th, 1845. It was disbanded January 4th, 1851, and has never been 
reorganized. 

Following is a list of Chief Engineers of the fire department since 
1862 : James Babcock, Patrick Kelly (three terms J; Thomas H. 
Kennedy, Edward Ellis (four terms) ; William E. Walker (two terms); 
Ezra McCue, Francis Cain (four terms); George B. Swartfigure, 
Martin Eagan, William J. Anthony, Arden W. Weller, John A. 
Vedder. 



212 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

CHAPTER XXIII. 

The Fight For Water. 

Schenectady is fringed and honey-combed with springs. Until 
about twenty years ago, creeks of pure water oozed out under the banks 
along the base of Prospect Hill. This hill is now being levelled and 
sold as a sand heap and disappearingunder the names of East Liberty, 
Landon Terrace, Prospect street and some other new streets under 
process of development. A hydraulic ram fed by a large spring fur- 
nished water for Union College as long ago as 1848. It was imme- 
diately in the rear of the Schenectady Brewing Co's plant and gave 
a generous supply. Under the bank below Veeder avenue, along 
South Center street, the earth was once honey-combed with springs 
and it is a damp country yet. 

As long ago as May 7th, 1799, a firm composed of Wright Tryar, 
James Case and Oliver Bull, obtained consent from the common 
council to supply the city with water by aqueducts if they could get 
consent of the owners, the works to be at the disposal of the com- 
mon council should they be needed. Nothing seems to have been 
done under this resolution. 

On July 6th of the same year, the common council passed the fol- 
lowing resolution : 

Resolved, That Henry R. Teller, Richard Rosa and Remsen R. 
Teller be permitted to lead the water works through any of the city 
lands from a certain spring which heads at the road leading to Gerrit 
S. Veeder's, upon condition that this board shall have the use of the 
tubes to be made use of by them in case they should at any time be 
necessary for the purpose of conducting water to the city for public 
uses ; the said persons, however, in such cases, to have the use of 
the water so to be conducted to the city, in common with other citi- 
zens. Adopted. 

No trace of the works can be found. 




^'z^.i'!f£:GP>i 



FIGHT FOR WATER. 213 

Subsequently, about the year 1836, Jabez Ward, a well known and 
much respected citizen, established a system of water delivery by 
tapping springs along Veeder avenue and the base of the hills there. 
The water was conducted by the gravity system through wooden logs 
which were of white pine and about one foot in diameter. The 
water was conveyed through a bore of not much more than two or 
three inches in diameter. It went to State street, down through 
State to Washington avenue with a branch at Ferry street, thence 
into Union. It seems also to have been made from Ferry to Front. 
Any quantity of these logs were taken up at the building of the 
water works by the Stanford Company in 1885. The tubes or logs 
were connected by cylinders of iron of an ingenious construction ; 
plenty of them are in possession of many citizens now. It was a 
very scant supply and accommodated but a small territory. It was a 
private enterprise and probably abandoned because it did not pay. 
Many of the logs are in use in the cemetery to hold the bank where 
support is needed. The work about the Potter tomb is upheld by 
them. 

No other efforts seem, from all we can learn, to have been made 
for a regular city supply, until the late Senator Stanford organized a 
company to supply the city with water. He began operations in 
1872. His plan was to take water directly from the river, not a 
good source then, but far better than now, when the river, in open 
and flagrant violation of the law, is an open sewer for all the manu- 
factories from Utica down. He built the present power house at the 
foot of Front street, supplying it by the use of Holly engines. The 
city was piped, hydrants established at the corners of the streets and 
the water began to flow. But the Senator had trouble from the start. 
Sand, silt and grit of all kinds cut the machinery, causing stoppages, 
delays and no end of trouble. So an intake was built at the east 
end of the second pier of the old bridge. The water there is very 
deep, about twenty-six feet. The pipes leaked, and, still persevering, 
a new intake was built on piles where it now remains in use in times 
of emergency in front of Mr. Yates' boat house. Schenectady, 
meanwhile, had obtained possession of the plant. 



214 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

But tlie water was foul, in freshets too muddy even for the bath, 
and the city frantically struggled for pure water. For years. Cow- 
horn Creek, running from the cemetery westward under Lafayette, 
Barrett and White (now Clinton), and under State, through the 
lower bouwery to the river, had been a horror. Investigation had 
long shown that a dead line ran along its bank, within which pesti- 
lence did its fiercest work, and where typhoid fever held a terrible 
dominion. All efforts to prevent sewage into its open stream failed, 
and the city began to get a bad name. On the fiats, south of the 
city, it was joined by the creeks from Schermerhorn's and Veeder's 
ponds. The culvert under the canal became clogged. Assembly- 
man Yates succeeded in passing a bill in the legislature by which 
the state opened the culvert and diverged the streams in a direct 
line to the Mohawk. It was a tremendous relief, but the malarious 
swamps still existed south of the city along between the banks of 
the D. & H., and the N. Y. C. R. R. 

Meanwhile, the sewage of the city increased, and the mains lead- 
ing to the Mohawk below the " poor pasture " were built in a day 
when no such monstrous growth was expected, and the town had to 
be dug up again. 

The chemists and doctors were getting in fine work all these 
years and sounding the tocsin of alarm. And they were right. 
Less than a quarter of a century ago this city was in a deplorable 
condition. Rigid ordinances were passed compelling connection 
with the city mains in all new buildings, removing all pestiferous 
outhouses, closing up bacterial and baccilic wells. And all united 
in denouncing the vileness of the water supply. 

The " city fathers " did their best. They made every effort to 
obey the demands of the Board of Health, of which the late Dr. 
Van Zandt, the present Dr. W. T. Clute and Livingston Swits were . 
and are such efficient members. 

The search for better water began. An attempt had been made 
by Senator Stanford to build wells at the foot of Ferry street, under 
the power house. It failed. Then great wells were dug opposite on 
the Glenville side. These were abandoned because the water was 
not there. 



FIGHT FOR WATER. 215 

Then the city went to the head of Van Slyck's Island at the con- 
fluence of the Frog Alley and the main river, and began a plan of 
building wells there and established the power station on the south 
side of the canal. The wells were dug and the water tested. The 
water supply was still insufficient and the beautiful pond in Scotia, 
known as Sander's Lake, was harnessed into service to see if it could 
not help the town, which began by this time to be pretty dry. The 
water was known to be of exceeding purity, in fact one vast spring, 
and fed by others all around its edge. A dam was built across its 
outlet and a steam pum.p set at work to test the capacity of the sup- 
ply. After two weeks' steady pumping, the lake was reduced three 
feet in depth and the surrounding springs were rivulets of magni- 
ficent, but insufficient water pouring from an elevation where the 
receding waters had left them, and despair began to settle down on 
the hydraulic engineers. The people were getting fretful and impa_ 
tient with what was called a monstrous waste of money in mere 
experiments. Thompson Lake, Warner's Lake in the Heidleberghs, 
Marie Lake and Mariaville Pond in Duanesburgh and even Ballston 
Lake were suggested and measurements and estimates made. The 
streams running out from every one of the sources of supply were 
found inadequate. 

All this time the Hon. Simon Schermerhorn and other prominent 
citizens of Rotterdam, who knew the lay of the land and the waters 
under the earth, had been insisting that the hillside back of the first 
and second locks No. 21,622 was a watershed of sufficient volume to 
supply all the city needed and give as good and pure water as could 
be found on earth. 

So wells were dug and relief came at last. Magnificent water in 
abundance, from a source that seemed to be an underground river, 
was discovered by George Ingersol, the present superintendent. To 
his indefatigable efforts Schenectady owes as much as to any other 
man. He was in the business of discovery from the very beginning, 
and was given charge of the work. The present water station and 
power house in Rotterdam were built, water led two and one-half 
miles into town and the first power house retained for an emergency. 

The creeks have been arched and culverted, the New York Cen- 



2i6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

tral completing the work by burying- them beneath its new freight 
houses. Schenectady is to-day one of the healthiest cities in the 
state. It is an astonishing fact, but absolutely true, that while we 
use the water of Rotterdam, the city is positively free from typhoid 
fever. When an emergency arising from accident, drives us to a few 
hours use of the river water, typhoid appears. In every instance, 
and they have been very few, this fact has been demonstrated. 

The water is of surpassing clearness and purity, decidedly blue in 
shade, while the river water is yellow. Its temperature is 46° Fahr. 
all the year around, a trifle hard for the toilet and laundry but fully 
available, and the finest table water east of the Alleghanies. 

Its present supply is 8,826,000 gallons per twenty-four hours. Our 
needs and use at present are five and one-half million gallons in 
twenty-four hours. It will not admit of wasteful use with our 
increasing population. It is believed that the supply exists for miles 
east and west, and that a greater demand can be met without impov- 
erishing the present wells. 

It has cost $400,000 to find a well, half a million to get rid of the 
river water, but no one now begrudges the money. 



CHAPTER XXIV. 
Genealogy. 



The full credit for all the wonderful research of this chapter must 
be accorded to Professor Pearson ; to the aid of the distinguished 
archivist, the Hon. John Sanders has added his valuable contribution 
derived from research, personal knowledge and the history that comes 
reliably down from father to son. Wherever a family has died out 
and their blood no longer flows here, its name has been left out. It 
is intended in this chapter to give those families only whose blood 
still runs in the veins of descendants. 

First we give the descendants of the original proprietors. 



GENEALOGY. 217 

The Van Curler blood is no longer in Schenectady. Brouer left 
no children. Van Velsen's whole family was massacred. There is 
no trace of any descendant of Peter Adrian. De Winter left no 
children. Catalina Bradt, widow of Arent Andrias Bradt, for whom 
he was attorney, was the real owner of the premises held in his 
name, and her genealogy can be easily traced in these pages. The 
Schermerhorns, one of the oldest and certainly the most eminent of 
the early settlers, is mingled with the name of her well known 
husband. 

The descendants of Glen are as follows : 

Jacob Alexander Glen, the eldest, of Albany, born in 1645, ^i^^ 
October 2d, 1685, aged forty years ; he died a little more than one 
month previous to the death of his father. He left surviving him 
three sons and two daughters, viz : 

John Glen, born 1675, who married Jane Bleecker of Albany, 
December nth, 1698, and died in 1707, leaving two sons and one 
daughter, viz : Jacob Alexander, John Alexander and Catharine 
Glen. 

Jacob Alexander Glen, Jr., was born October 7th, 1703, and mar- 
ried Elizabeth Cuyler, December 29th, 1732 ; died April i6th, 1746. 
This was the father of our distinguished citizen, John Glen, who 
was quartermaster during the French and Revolutionary wars, sta- 
tioned at Schenectady, and who built and occupied the venerable 
mansion situated on Washington avenue, now modernized. He was 
born in July, 1735, and died in Greenbush at the residence of his 
son-in-law, John J. Van Rensselaer, September 23d, 1828, aged ninety- 
three years. Jacob A. Glen was also the father of Col. Henry Glen 
of Schenectady, who was member of Congress from this, then 
Albany district, from 1794 to 1802. Colonel Glen was born July 
13th, 1739, and died January 6th, 1814, aged nearly seventy-five 
years. 

Both of these Glens were ardent and stirring patriots of the Revo- 
lution and highly esteemed personal friends of General Washington. 
On all occasions, when the older brother was quartermaster, the 
younger brother was his deputy. 



2i8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

Anna, the eldest daughter of Jacob Alexander Glen, Sr., born in 
1677, married Harmanus Wandell, 

Jacob, the second son of Jacob Alexander Glen, Sr., born in 1679, 
and Helena, his youngest daughter, born November 21st, 1683, mar- 
ried Jacob G. Lansing in 17 10. 

Alexander Glen, the third youngest son of Jacob Alexander Glen, 
Sr., was born November 15th, 1685, removed to Schenectady, and on 
the 1 8th of December, 17 14, married Rebecca, daughter of Isaac 
Swits, He died November 2d, 1763, and was buried in the old 
Dutch church cemetery at Schenectady. He had several children, 
and is represented in this community by many lineal descendants. 
His son Jacob Glen, born December 8th, 171 7, married Folica, 
daughter of Jan Barentse Wemple, and widow of Barent H. Vroo- 
man. She died April i6th, 1749. His daughter, Susanna, born 
August 4th, 1722, married Abraham Fonda, February 2 2d, 1755, 
and died March 21st, 1773. Abraham Fonda owned and lived in 
the house No. 27 Front street in 1752 and now occupied by Mr. 
Hansen V. Yates. 

Alexander Glen, the second son of Alexander Lindsey Glen (com- 
monly called Captain Glen), born in 1647, lived in the village of 
Schenectady, and married Anna, daughter of Jan Barentse Wemp, 
(now called Wemple), who received, in 1662, in company with 
Jacques Cornelise Van Slyck, the Indian title for the great island 
lying immediately west of Schenectady, and owned a house and lot 
in the village, on the west side of Washington street, a little north of 
State street. He owned a large bouwery (farm) at Lubbude's land 
(Troy), but was never called a proprietor of Schenectady, not being 
one of the original petitioners. He died soon after 1662, and his 
widow, Maritie Mynderse, in 1664, married Swear Teunise Van 
Velsen, one of the original proprietors. 

Captain Alexander Glen was a justice of the peace for the county 
of Albany ; but in the troublesome times of 1689, when most of the 
citizens of Schenectady belonged to, or sided with, the Leslerian 
faction, Jacob Lesler appointed Myndert Barentse Wemp, a brother- 
in-law of the Captain, a justice in his stead. Wemp was killed at 
the burning of Schenectady in 1690, and his son John, with two of his 



GENEALOGY. 219 

negro men, carried into captivity. John subsequently returned, mar- 
ried a daughter of Ryer Schermerhorn, June 15th, 1700, and became 
one of the trustees of the Schenectady patent. 

Mr. Glen died in 1695, aged about thirty-eight years, leaving his 
widow Anna, surviving him, but no children. 

John Alexander Glen, the third and youngest son of Alexander 
Lindsey Glen, (commonly called Major Coudre, his designation by 
the French and Indians), was born November 5th, 1648, and died 
November 6th, 1731, at the advanced age of eighty-three years. Mr. 
Glen was twice married. First, on the 2d day of May, 1667, to 
Anna, the daughter of John Peek, an early settler of New Amster- 
dam, and from whom the creek at Peekskill takes its name. He 
was living at Scotia when Schenectady was burned in 1690. She 
died on the 19th day of December in that year. On the 21st of 
June, 1 69 1, he married Deborah, the daughter of Evert Jans Wen- 
dell, and widow of Myndert Wemp, a justice of the peace, appointed 
by Liesler, who was killed at the massacre of 1690. So it will be seen 
that Captain Alexander Glen and Major John A. Glen, his brother, 
married sisters-in-law. 

From his two marriages, John Alexander Glen had thirteen child- 
ren, some of whom died in infancy, and are not particularly noticed 
here. 

Catharine, his eldest child, born March 23d, 1672, on March loth, 
1698, married Gerrit Lansing, Jr., died, February 15th, 1731. 

Jemima, his second child, born May 9th, 1674, married November 
9th, 1694, James Van Dyck, a physician of Schenectady, where he 
practiced until his death. He is the ancestor of the gallant Col. 
Cornelius Van Dyck, who was lieutenant-colonel of the First Vete- 
ran New York regiment in the Revolutionary War, commanded by 
Colonel Goosen Van Shaick, and after Van Shaick's promotion, 
became its colonel during the remainder of the war. Mrs. Van 
Dyck died February 6th, 1731. 

Alexander, his third child, born November 30th, 1676, died off the 
island of Madagascar, December 17th, 1696, as surgeon on board a 
ship of war, aged about twenty years. 

Maria, his fourth child, born March 21st, 1678, married Albert 



220 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Vedder, December 17th, 1699. He was carried away captive by the 
French and Indians, February 9th, 1690. She died March 13th, 
1753, aged nearly seventy-four years. Her husband died August ist, 
1753, aged eighty-two years, two months and twenty-one days. 

Helena, his fifth child, born November 2d, 1681, married July 9th, 
1699, John Baptist Van Eps. He, too, was carried away captive to 
Montreal by the French and Indians, in 1690, but, after a bondage 
of three years, made his escape. 

John, his sixth child, born November 28th, 1683, died December 
5th, 1709, unmarried. 

Jacob Glen, his eighth child (commonly called Colonel Glen), was 
born December 29th, 1690, and on December i.sth, 171 7, married 
Sarah Wendell, daughter of Captain Johannes Wendell of Albany. 
He inherited from his father the Scotia mansion and a considerable 
portion of his original estate, but added largely to his possessions 
before his decease, which occurred at his residence, in Scotia, Aug- 
ust 15th, 1762. His wife died three days afterwards, both from 
malignant ship fever, contracted through some emigrants whom they 
had charitably housed a short time previous. At the time of his 
decease Colonel Glen was aged seventy years, eight months and four- 
teen days ; at his wife's decease she was aged seventy-three years, 
nine months and eleven days. 

Colonel Glen was a man of much influence in the community ; 
an extensive agriculturalist, a noted surveyor, had been several times 
a member of the provincial legislature, and held the command of all 
the militia forces west of Albany, constituting a regiment at one 
time numbering 3,000 men. 

The Veeder lineage is as follows : 

Peter Veeder, on the 9th day of June, 1704, married Naeltie, 
daughter of Class Van Der Volgen ; left three sons and one daughter 
surviving him, but was not living, Jime 26th, 1709, when his youngest 
son, Peter, was born. His father gave him lands on the Norman's 
Kil. 

Gerrit Veeder, second son of Simon Volkertse, married, October 
3d, 1690, Tryntje (Catharine), daughter of Helmer (William) Otten. 
She was the only child of Otten, who died in 1676. His widow, 



GENEALOGY. 221 

Ariantie (Harriet), daughter of Arent Andreas Bradt, called the 
Norman, subsequently, about nine months after his decease, married 
Ryer Schermerhorn. Gerrit Veeder died in 1755, and left surviving 
him five sons, respectively named Helmers, Wilhelmus, Hendricus, 
Simons and Cornelis ; and four daughters, named Engletie, married 
to Johannes Vedder ; Ariantje, married to Daniel Danielse Van Ant- 
werpen ; Annatie, married to William Bancker, and Hellena, mar- 
ried to John Bancker. 

Gerrit owned the land about Veeder's mill, early in the eighteenth 
century, and had lease from the Church of the mill privilege, in 
1 7 18. Through his wife, Catharine, he obtained possession of lots 
in the village, on the north and west corners of Union and Church 
streets, which she inherited from her father, Otten. 

Otten had, in 1670, purchased from Peter Adriance, called Soge- 
makelyk, also as original proprietor, twenty-six morgans of land, 
which afterwards became the old Schermerhorn mill farm, now in 
Rotterdam ; also a village lot, two hundred feet square, located on 
the southwest corner of Union and Church streets. These his 
daughter Catharine did not inherit, for it seems at his death John 
Van Eps owned and occupied the village lot, and Ryer Schermer- 
horn, who married his widow, as stated, owned the twenty-six 
morgans. 

Mr. Schermerhorn was always a prominent actor in the early days 
of Schenectady. He was the oldest son of Jacob Janse Schermer- 
horn, who was the ancestor of all the Schermerhorns in this country, 
born at Waterland, Holland, in 1622. We find Jacob- Janse a pros- 
perous brewer and trader at Beverwyck, as early as 1648. 

In that year he was arrested at Fort Orange, by Governor Stuyve- 
sant's order, on a charge of selling arms and ammunition to the 
Indians. His books and papers were siezed, and himself removed a 
prisoner to Fort Amsterdam, where he was sentenced to banishment 
for five years, with the confiscation of all his property. 

Jacob Janse made his will. May 26th, 1688, and soon after died at 
Schenectady. Notwithstanding his losses by confiscation in 1648, 
his estate, amounting to 56,882 guilders, was large for the times. 



222 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY, 

He left surviving him five sons, named Ryer, Symon, Jacob, Corne- 
lius and Lucas ; also three daughters, named Machtelt, Jannette and 
Neeltie. 

Ryer Schermerhorn, this oldest and remarkable son of Jacob 
Janse, in July, 1676, married Ariantje, daughter of Arent Arentse 
Bradt, and widow of Helmer Otten, of Albany ; immediately after 
marriage Ryer settled in Schenectady, upon bouwery No. 4, on the 
flats, heretofore known as " Schermerhorn's Mill," which, after being 
in possession of the family for two hundred years, has lately passed 
to other owners. This property came to Ryer through his wife, 
Ariantje, whose first husband, Otten, purchased it of the original 
proprietor, Peter Adrianse (Sogemakelyk). 

Ryer Schermerhorn was one of the first patentees of the town- 
ship of Schenectady, granted in 1684, and was the sole surviving 
patentee of the township in 1705, when he was complained of as 
exercising arbitrary power over the town affairs, and rendering no 
account of his proceedings. Of this more will be subsequently 
written. In 1690, he was a member of the Provincial Assembly 
from Albany county, and also a justice of the peace. In 1700 he 
was appointed an associate judge of the Court of Common Pleas, 
He made his will April 5th, 1717, and died February 19th, 1719. 
His wife, Ariantje, died in 1717. He left surviving him three sons, 
John, Jacob and Arent ; also two daughters, Catalina, wife of Johan- 
nes Wemp, and Janneke, wife of Volkert Simonse Veeder. 

The writer, for the present, would have continued the Schermer- 
horn line no further, except to correct impressions held by some, 
confounding the two Ryers, grandfather and grandson, both shrewd 
and remarkable men. 

John, the eldest son of Ryer Schermerhorn, inherited the home- 
stead farm at the " Schuylenberg " Mills, etc., and on the 8th of 
April, 171 1, married Engeltie, daughter of Jan Hendrickse Vrooman. 
He died in 1752, and his wife in 1754. He left surviving him six 
sons, Ryer, the eldest, born September 24th, 1716, so often in tra- 
ditional data confounded with his distinguished grandfather. Of 
this grandson Ryer, more will be written hereafter. The other sons, 
brothers of Ryer, were named John, Simon, Bartholomew, Jacob and 



GENEALOGY. 223 

Bernhardus Freeman. John also left six daughters ; Ariantje, mar- 
ried to Nicholas DeGraff ; Gezina, married to Phillip Van Patten ; 
Catalina, married to John Dodds ; Neeltje, married to Class Viele ; 
Magdalena, died unmarried, and Jannetje, married Barent Veeder, 

After this, as it is claimed, justifiable digression, we return to 
Simon Volckertse Veeder's line. 

John Veeder, his third son, on the 19th of November, 1697, mar- 
ried Susanna, daughter of Myndert Wemp, and for his second wife, 
June 3d, 1 718, married Susanna Wendell of Albany. He died in 
1746, and left surviving him two sons, named respectively, Myndert 
and Simon ; also three daughters, Engeltie, married to Jacobus La 
Grange, Maria and Debora, married first to Ryer Wemp, secondly to 
Dowe Fonda. 

Volckert, his fourth son, August 6th, 1693, married Jannitie, 
daughter of the elder Ryer Schermerhorn. By his father's will he 
inherited farm No. 9 on the bouwelandt (flats). 

He died August 12th, 1733, and left surviving him four sons, 
respectively named Simon, Ryer, John and Hendricus, and three 
daughters, Ariantje, married to William Daasen ; Susanna, married 
to Harmanus Vedder, and Catalyntje, married to Simon Veeder. 

Folica, a daughter of Simon Volkertse, married Barent Janse 
Wemp, (Wemple), who was appointed captain of a company of foot 
by Jacob Leisler in 1690. 

Gertrude, also a daughter, July 4th, 1680, married John Hendrickse 
Vrooman. They left many descendants, and their son Peter, born 
October 2d, 1688, was killed at the Buekendahl massacre, three miles 
northwest of Schenectady in 1748. 

Magdalena, another daughter, married William Appel, who was 
severely wounded at the burning of Schenectady in 1690, as was 
also his brother, John Appel. 

The Van Slyck lineage is as follows : 

Hillitie, the eldest daughter of Cornells Antonisen Van Slyck, 
married Peter Danielse Van Olinda of Niskayuna. She was for 
many years employed as provincial interpreter with the Indians by 
the government at ^50 per annum. The Mohawk sachems in 1667, 
gave her the great island in the Mohawk river at Niskayuna. She 



224 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

and her husband sold the island in 1669 to Captain Johannes Clute. 
The sachems also gave to her land at the Willow Flat, below Port 
Jackson ; and at the boght on the Mohawk in Watervliet. She died 
February loth, 1707, leaving three sons, Daniel, Jacob and Matthew. 
The last died unmarried. 

Daniel, the oldest son, June nth, 1696, married Lysbeth Krigier, 
a granddaughter of the old burgomaster Martinus Krigier, and left 
surviving him three sons, Peter, John and Martin. 

Jacob, the second son, married Eva, daughter of Class DeGraff, 
and left four sons, named Peter, William, Martin and Nicholas ; also 
one daughter, Helena, who on the i6th of June, 1723, married 
Johannes Quackenbos. 

Leah, the youngest daughter of Cornells Antonisen, married, first, 
Class W'illemse Van Coppernol, who hired the farm of William 
Teller at Schenectady, and subsequently settled on land of his wife 
at the Willegen, below Port Jackson. He died in 1692, leaving one 
son named William. She subsequently, July 24th, 1693, married 
Jonathan Stevens, who had leased Lysbeth Brower's farm at the 
Hoeck in Scotia, in 1697. He came from New England, and was 
born in 1675. Before his death he owned a home lot in Schenec- 
tady, and a farm about four miles northeast of the town, on the 
north side of the Mohawk river. At his death he left surviving two 
sons, named Hendricus and Arent, also two daughters, named Annatje 
and Dina. 

Hendricus, the oldest, born November loth, 1697, married. May 
29th, 1730, Maria Phoenix of New York. He resided there, and on 
his decease left two sons surviving him, viz : Arent and Johannes. 

Arent, the youngest son of Jonathan, born July 26th, 1702, mar- 
ried, first, Maritje, daughter of William Hall, February 3d, 1726; 
second, jNIary Griffiths, widow of Lieutenant Thomas Burrows, Feb- 
ruar}-' 4th, 1749. Arent died May 17th, 1758. For more than 
twenty 3^ears before his decease he acted as Indian interpreter, and 
was often employed by Sir William Johnson in negotiations with the 
different tribes. He had by his two marriages six sons and four 
daughters, respectively named Jonathan, William, Nicholas, John, 



GENEALOGY. 225 

Jacobus, Richard, Catrina, Maria, Lea and Anna. There is only 
proper room to particularize one of them. 

Jonathan, his oldest child, born December ist, 1726, who, as first 
lieutenant under Captain William McGinnis, with eighty-nine men 
of Schenectady, was at the battle of Fort George, September 7th, 
1755, where both officers were killed, and the company then deci- 
mated ; this was the preliminary ambush fight with Baron Dieskaw, 
where the great King Hendrick and the gallant Colonel Ephraim 
Williams (the munificent founder of Williams College, and after 
whom it was named) were killed. According to Sir William John- 
son's official report, the Schenectady officers and men " fought like 
lions." 

Jonathan Stevens was less than thirty years of age and unmarried, 
at the time he was killed. Captain McGinnis married Margaret, 
daughter of Peter Veeder, February 21st, 1751, and left an only 
child, Alexander, who died February 13th, 1770. 

The descendants of William Teller, ninth proprietor, are as 
follows : 

John, the oldest child of William Teller, born in 1641, settled in 
Schenectady as early as 1659, and on the i8th of August, 1686, 
married the daughter of Captain Johannes Wendell of Albany. In 
1690, on the burning of Schenectady, he was carried away captive 
by the French and Indians to Montreal, but was ransomed and 
returned after several month's detention. In 1700 his father, Wil- 
liam, in consideration that John had sustained heavy losses by the 
destruction of Schenectady in 1690, conveyed to him "his bouwery 
and farm at that place. John died May 28th, 1725, aged about 
eighty-four years, leaving three sons and three daughters, viz : 

William, born October 4th, 1695, was married on the 5th of 
March, 1731, to Catharine, daughter of William Van Allen of 
Albany. He lived on the Teller bouwery. No. 5, next west of Tel- 
ler's Killitie and died April 25th, 1757. 

John, second son of John, died unmarried. 

Jacobus, third son of John, born July 15th, 1698, probably died 
unmarried. 



226 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Margaret, a daughter of John, born February 19th, 1693, married 
Jacob Schermerhorn. 

Maria, another daughter, born December 25th, 1700, married 
Abraham Glen of Scotia. 

Anna, also a daughter, born February 20th, 1704, married Har- 
manus Veeder. 

John, son of William, Jr., married Jane, daughter of John Dela- 
mont. 

Jacobus, also a son of William, Jr., married Maria, daughter of 
Joseph R. Yates. In 1764 he was an Indian trader in company with 
John and Henry Glen, and was killed by the Indians at Detroit, 
September 27th, 1784. This was the father of William Teller, a 
talented and prominent lawyer of Schenectady, who died July 19th, 
1 81 5, aged forty years, and who was the first surrogate of Schenec- 
tady county. 

William, also a son of William, Jr., married Helena, daughter of 
Jacobus Van Eps. 

Thus, from the line of his son, John Teller, the blood of the old 
proprietor, William Teller, circulates through several channels in 
this community. 

Catalina Bradt, widow of Arent Andreas, sent down the following 
posterity so that the blood of the old proprietor, Arent Andries, still 
courses in the veins of many of Schenectady's sons and daughters. 

For, of their remaining children, Aeffie, (Eve) married Nicholas 
Van Patten, who came to Schenectady in 1664, and in 1668 pur- 
chased the bouwery of Cornelise Van Esselstyne, lying next west of 
the farm of Ryer Schermerhorn, who was his brother-in-law. This 
farm remained in the Van Patten family for several generations. 
They each lived to an advanced age. He died October 3d, 1728, 
aged eighty-seven years and five months ; she died January 23d, 1728, 
aged seventy-eight years. In 1690 he was appointed a justice of the 
peace by Leisler. 

Arent, the oldest son of Nicholas, April loth, 1703, married Jan- 
netje, daughter of Philip Coyn of Albany. 

iVndries, another son of Nicholas, December 26th, 1712, married 
Muike, daughter of Jacob Ten Eyck of Albany. 



GENEALOGY. 227 

Nicholas, also a son of Nicholas, Sr., April 20th, 171 2, married 
Rebecca, daughter of Simon Groot, Jr. 

Deborah, another daughter of Nicholas, Sr., April ist, 1700, mar- 
ried Cornelius Viele, Sr., who was the first Viele settled at Maalyck, 
on the north shore of the Mohawk river, about two miles above the 
Reform church in Scotia. 

Catalynje, also a daughter of Nicholas, Sr., November 8th, 1694, 
married Tennis Dirkse Van Vechten of Lunenburg (now Athens), 
Greene county. 

Gertrude, alsQ a daughter of Nicholas, Sr., April 17th, 1687, mar- 
ried Lourens Class Van Der Volgen. At the destruction of Schenec- 
tady, in 1690, he was carried away captive to Canada by the Indians, 
with whom he remained several years — so late as 1699 — acquiring a 
perfect knowledge of their language. After his return he was 
appointed interpreter of the province for the Five Nations, at a 
salary of ^60 per annum, which office he held until his decease in 
1740. 

Harriet, another daughter of Catalina Bradt, and widow of Helnier 
Otten, in July. 1676, married Ryer Schermerhorn, son of Jacob Janse 
Schermerhorn. Their immediate children have been hereinbefore 
noticed. But it is deemed proper to note some particulars about 
their grandson, a son of their son John, named Ryer, who was a 
man of remarkable perseverance, energy and determination. 

Ryer Schermerhorn was born on the 24th of September, 17 16. 
June 8th, 1746, he married Maria, daughter of Corset Vedder, and 
secondly Maria, daughter of Ryckert Van Vranken, June 8th, 1750. 
He died March 6th, 1795, and had always resided at Schuylerberg 
(the Mills). 

Richard, son of Ryer, born March 9th, 1755, married Annatje 
Van Vechten. His daughter Maria, July i8th, 1779, married Don we 
J. Clute, and his daughter Helena, November 8th, 1781, married 
Nioholas P. Clute. 

Maria, a daughter of Ryer, born November loth, 1752, married 
Peter Van Guysling, in 1770. 

Gerrit, a son of Ryer, born October 23d, 1763. On May i8th, 
1787, married Mariatje, daughter of Arent Schermerhorn, Jr. He 



228 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

died in Rotterdam, March 24th, 1848, in his eighty-fifth }'ear, leav- 
ing the following children: Jacomyntje, born August loth, 1790; 
Maria, born March 27th, 1792; Jacob, born May 28th, 1794; Cath- 
aria, born September 27th, 1796. 

Engeltie, a daughter of Ryer, born August nth, 1762, married 
Class Schermerhorn, She died October 6th, 1834, aged seventy- 
three years, one month and Iwenty-five days. 

Bartholomew, another son of Ryer, born August 24th, 1757. On 
the loth day of July, 1785, married Annatje, daughter of John Tel- 
ler. He died at his country seat in Rotterdam (the Mills), July i6th, 
1845, aged eighty-seven years. His wife died May 4th, 1844, in her 
seventy-seventh year. 

Ryer, their oldest son, was a printer, born December 8th, 1786. 
He married Gertrude Abel, and died November nth, 1850. 

John, their second son, born October 12th, 1787. On the 6th of 
April, 1806, married Gertrude, daughter of Andries Van Patten. 
He died February 29th, 1872. 

Bartholomew Teller, born March 26th, 1807. 

Andrew Vedder, born April i8th, 1809. 

Ann Maria, born December i8th, 181 1. 

William, born June 30th, 1814. 

Angelica, born February 25th, 1819. 

Barnardus Freeman, born February 4th, 18 12. 

Abram Van Patten, born July 9th, 1823. 

Simon , born October 4th, 1824. 

James , born February 17th, 1827. 

Bartholomew, their son, was born December 8th, 1789. 

Jane, their daughter, born April i6th, 1792, married Nicholas 
Viele of Glenville. She died November 17th, i860. He died 
November 24th, 1861. 

Maria, a daughter of Bartholomew Schermerhorn, Sr., born July 
26th, 1794, died April 5th, 18 16. 

Annatje, also a daughter, born August 14th, 1799, married Jacob 
DeForrest, Jr., of Rotterdam, and died April 27th, 1851, aged fifty- 
two years. 



GENEALOGY. 229 

Bernardns Freeman, also a son of Bartholomew, born December 
22d, 1 801, died suddenly, August 25th, 1871, at a religious meeting in 
the First Dutch Reformed church of Schenectady. 

Catherine, a daughter of Bartholomew, born October 9th, 1804, 
married James B. Schermerhorn of Rotterdam. 

Eliza Margaret, the youngest daughter of Bartholomew, born 
October 13th, 181 1, married Martin DeForrest of Schenectady, Sep- 
tember 19th, 1832. 

It has been said that Ryer Schermerhorn, the father of Bartholo- 
mew, and grandson of the first Ryer, was a man of remarkable per- 
severance, energy and determination. An illustration cannot be out 
of place at this point. It is handed down by well established autho- 
rity, that shortly after the termination of the Revolutionary War, 
when the long contested suit of Ryer Schermerhorn against the 
Trustee of the Schenectady Patent was pending in our Supreme 
Court, Ryer Schermerhorn, the plaintiff, was unexpectedly informed 
by his counsel. Judge James Duane, that certain documents, then in 
the hands of one Appel, at New York, must be in court at Albany, 
within eight days from that time, or his cause would be greatly 
endangered. Bear in mind there were then no telegraphs, no steam- 
boats, no stage routes, miserable roads, only a weekly mail, the 
sloops took generally two weeks, sometimes three, to accomplish the 
distance between Albany and New York. Nothing daunted, Scher- 
merhorn started single-handed, in a canoe from Albany, went to New 
York, procured the necessary documents, and on the morning of the 
first session of court, much to the surprise and gratification of his 
counsel, delivered him the desired papers. This certainly would be 
called something of a feat for a young man of the present day. 

Samuel Bradt, another son of Arent Andreas and Catalina, mar- 
ried Susanna, another daughter of Jacques Cornelise Van Slyck. 

Arent, their oldest child, built and resided in the ancient brick 
house, now standing southwest of the first lock above the city. He 
married Catrina, daughter of Jan Pieterse Mabie. She died in 1773, 
aged eighty-two years, two months and seventeen days. They had 
five sons and five daughters. Their youngest child, Angelica, born 

16 



230 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

August 26th, 'i'/SS, married Daniel Campbell of Schenectady. 

Margaret, a daughter of Samuel, born April 26th, 1686, married 
Captain Daniel Toll, who, on the i8th of July, 1748, was murdered 
by the French Indians, at a place (in the present town of Glenville), 
called the Cleykuil, less than half a mile north of Beukendahl, 
where, on the same day, Nicholas DeGraff and twenty-four others 
were killed by the French and Indians. They had two sons and five 
daughters. Their second daughter, Elizabeth, born January 14th, 
1 721, married the Rev. Cornelius Van Santvoord. Their youngest 
daughter, Gertrude, born August 7th, 1729, married Jellis Clute. 

Jacobus, second son of Samuel, born January 3d, 1695, married 
Margaret, daughter of Johannes Clute, They had five sons and 
three daughters. Their daughter Bata, born January 30th, 1732, 
married Abraham Watson. 

Catalyntje, another daughter of Samuel, born December 21, 1701, 
married Jacobus Van Slyck, September 2d, 1732. He was colonel 
and ccir.manding officer at Schenectady in 1754. He was a member 
of assembly in 1750 and 1771. He left two sons, Harmanus, born 
August 5th, 1733, and Samuel, born March 17th, 1738 ; and two 
daughters, Gertrude, born November ist, 1734, and Jannetje, born 
June 13th, 1736. This last married Philip Riley. 

Susanna, also a daughter of Samuel, born January 2d, 1704, mar- 
ried Bartholomew Vrooman, March nth, 1726. 

Andreas, another son of Samuel, born October 28th, 1705, mar- 
ried Anna DeGraff of Esopus, January 29th, 1743. 

Samuel, son of Samuel, born April 30th, 1707, married Catharia, 
daughter of Arent Van Patten, October loth, 1732. They had four 
sons and six daughters. 

Ephraim, also a son of Samuel, born February 12th, 171 2, mar- 
ried Clara, daughter of Philip Borsie, and widow of Cornelius Viele, 
Jr., in May, 1751. They had three daughters of whom Susanna 
married David Siger ; Cornelia married ISIartin Van Benthuysen and 
Margaret married Nicholas Van Patten. 

Dirck Bradt, another son of Arent Andrease and Catalina, born in 
1661, married INIaritie, daughter of Jan Baptist Van Eps. He inher- 
ited his step-father's, Van Bockhoven's farm in Niskayuna (Van Bock- 



GENEALOGY. 231 

hoven was the third husband of his mother, Catalyiitje). They had 
three sons and four daughters. Catalina, born June 27th, 1695, mar- 
ried in 1725, William Berrit. Maria, born September 22d, 1698, mar- 
ried Rykert Van Vranken. John, born May 22d, 1704, married, Feb- 
ruary loth, 1732, Margaretta, daughter of Gerrit R. Van Vranken- 
Dirck, born July 20th, 1710, married, November 5th, 1732, Annatje, 
daughter of Arent D. Van Antwerpen. 

Catalina, this venerable woman, the daughter of Andreas DeVos, 
deputy director of Rensselaerwyck and Veeders, hereinbefore noticed, 
was thrice married. First, in 1648, to Arent Andrease Bradt, to whom 
she bore all her children, except one to her second husband, Van 
Ditmars. Arent Andrease dying in 1662, on the 12th of November, 
1664, she married Barent Jans Van Ditmars, who, with his son Cor- 
nelius, their only child, was killed at the massacre in 1690. Corne- 
lius had married Catharina, a daughter of John Alexander Glen of 
Scotia, who, after his death, married Gerrit Lansing, Jr. In 169:, 
Catalina married Class Janse Van Bockhoven, her third husband. 
He made his will January nth, 1698, devising his whole estate 
equally to the six Bradt children of his wife Catalina. She survived 
him and died in 1712, aged about eighty-four years. 

It has been stated that Andries Arent Bradt (brewer, son of Cata- 
lina), and one of his children, were killed at the massacre in 1690 ; 
but he left two children surviving him, Bathsheda, a daughter subse- 
quently married to Charles Burns, and Captain Arent Andrease Bradt, 
a son, who, under then existing laws of the colony, was the right of 
his grandfather, Arent Andries, one of the first settlers of Schenec- 
tady. 

There are no means of ascertaining accurately when Captain 
Andrees was born, but with the knowledge that his father, Arent 
Andrees, was killed in 1690, at the age of thirty-seven years, and 
that Captain Bradt was married March 4th, 1705, to Jannetje, daugh- 
ter of John Hendrickse Vrooman, (brother of the heroic Adam 
Vrooman, the bold defender of his home in 1690), it is quite safe to 
assume approximately that he was born about the year 1680, and, as 
he died in 1767, he must have been, at the time of his death, about 



232 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

the age of eighty-seven ; tradition hands it down as about ninety 
years. 

Captain Bradt was one of the most remarkable citizens of Schenec- 
tady's olden time, and was distinguished for marked decision and 
probity of character. He was a member of the Provincial Assembly 
in 1745, ^^^ ^ trustee of the township of Schenectady from 17 15 to 
1767, when he died, (a period of fifty-two years), being for many 
years sole surviving trustee. Well knowing the legal difficulties and 
contentions which had previously existed, through the claims of 
Ryer Schermerhorn, his relative and a former surviving trustee, to 
ownership, to prevent a recurrence of such claims and litigation, he, 
with great care and solemnity, executed a will of date March nth, 
1765, which was admitted to probate at Albany, November 19th, 
1770. 

It became the sheet-author of Schenectady's common land inter- 
ests in subsequent legal conflicts with Ryer Schermerhorn, and a 
fictitious set of trustees, appointed by him as the successor of his 
father, John, and his grandfather, Ryer, Sr., the old surviving 
trustee. 

Captain Bradt built and occupied, until his death, an ancient 
house with a brick front, standing on the north side of State street, 
near Washington avenue (on his ancestral village lot), being the 
building once occupied by Mr. J. W. McMillan for his marble works. 
Its appearance was truly venerable. Its unpretentious Dutch gable 
fronting on State street was erected of brick said to be imported 
from Holland. The building was deep in proportion to its frontage, 
its pitch-pine timbers were immense, and apparently not affected by 
age, unless as they seem hardened and solidified. It was taken down 
a few years ago. 

This was unquestionably the oldest building remaining in the 
city of Schenectady, but precisely when erected, cannot now be 
determined. Old settlers have long called it the oldest dwelling, and 
unless it be the Scotia mansion, erected by John Alexander Glen, in 
1713, (Mr. Glen was thirty years older than Captain Bradt, and a 
contemporary with him), the Bradt building was probably the oldest 
dwelling standing in the former province of New York, unless we 



1 



GENEALOGY. 



2Z2> 



also except the old Pemberton building standing on the corner of 
North Pearl and Columbia streets, in the city of Albany, believed to 
have been erected in 17 lo, now taken down. 

The following is the lineage from Jan Barentse Wemple, four- 
teenth proprietor. He was an inhabitant of Beverwyck as early as 
1643. Having purchased the interest of Martin Maurice Van Slyck 
in 1662, he recovered, as joint owner with Martin Maurice's brother, 
Jacques Cornelise, a patent for the Great Island, lying immediately 
west of Schenectady, which interest was subsequently owned by 
Swear Teunise Van Velsen, who had married Wemp's widow. 
Wemp also had a house lot in the village, on the west side of Wash- 
ington street, a little north of State street, with a front of 200 feet 
on Washington street, running down with equal width to the strand 
on the main Bennekill. He died in 1663, and left the following 
named children surviving him, viz : 

Myndert, born in 1649, married Deborah, daughter of Evert Janse 
Wendell of Albany. He was appointed a justice of the peace of 
Schenectady, by Leisler, in 1689. He was killed in the massacre of 
February, 1690, and his son John, with two of his negro slaves, was 
carried into captivity. This son John, after his return, married Cat- 
alina, daughter of Ryer Schermerhorn, June 15th, 1700, and sec- 
ondly, on the 1 6th of October, 1709, married Ariantje, daughter of 
Isaac Swits. He was one of the trustees of the Schenectady patent. 

Barent, the second son of Jan Barentse, born in 1656, married 
Folkje, daughter of Symon Volkertse Veeder. He 'was appointed 
captain of a company of infantry, by Leisler, in 1690, and died in 
1705, leaving a numerous family of children, from whom many of 
the inhabitants of this valley are descended. 

Maria, his daughter, born in 1688, married Hendrick Vrooman. 

Engeltie, his daughter, born in 1695, married Nicholas Hansen. 

Margaret, his daughter, born in 1697, married Simon V. Veeder. 

Anna, a daughter of Jan Barentse, born in 1653, married Captain 
Alexander Glen of Schenectady, a son of Alexander Lindsey Glen of 
Scotia. 

Alida, another daughter, married Jan Cornelise Van der Heyden of 
Beverwyck. 



234 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Jacques Cornelius Van Slyck was the fifteenth and last proprietor. 
He was possessed of a large landed interest, made his will on the 8th 
day of May, 1690, and died soon afterwards, aged fifty years, leaving 
a widow, Margaret, daughter of Harman Janse Ryckman of Albany, 
who, on the 2rst day of February, 1692, married her brother-in-law, 
Adam Vrooman, who so gallantly defended his dwelling, when his 
wife, Angelica (the sister of Margaret), with her infant child, were 
killed, and two of his sons, Barent and Walter were carried into 
captivity. 

Harman, the oldest son of Jacques, born March 26th, 1704, mar- 
ried Jane, daughter of Adam Vrooman. He was captain of a Sche- 
nectady company in 17 14, and Indian trader in 1724. He received 
a grant of three hundred morgans of land, at Canajoharie, from the 
Mohawks, because " his grandmother was a right Mohawk woman," 
and " his father born with us at Canajoharie." He also inherited a 
farm from his father on the first flat. He left a numerous family of 
children, and made his will November ist, 1731. He died December 
20th, 1734, leaving to his sons, Adam, James and Harmanus, one- 
half of his 2,000 acres of land at Canajoharie, known as Van Slyck's 
patent. 

Cornelius, second son of Jacques, born on the loth day of Febru- 
ary, 1696, married Clara Janse Bradt of Albany. He lived upon the 
first flat. 

Hendrick, son of Cornelius, born June 6th, 1729, married Cath- 
arina, daughter of Cornelius Slingerland ; they had one child, Clara, 
who married Johannes J. Vrooman, 

Anthony, son of Cornelius, born November 19th, 1730, married 
Margaret Van Slyck ; they had one child, Cornelius, born i2th of 
April, 173', who was the father of Harmanus Van Slyck, formerly a 
sheriff of Schenectady county. This Harmanus married Annatje, 
daughter of John Haverly, October 28th, 1798, and was the father of 
Anthony H. Van Slyck, born June 2 2d, 1800, who was, for one term, 
sheriff of Schenectady county, and died January 6th, i8ro. He 
married Wemple Haverly. 

Adrian, son of Cornelius, October 17th, 1736, married Jannetje 
Viele; for his second wife, Bregie, daughter of Carel Hansen Toll, 



GENEALOGY. 235 

November 26th, 1741. Adrian was killed July iStli, 1748, in the 
Beiikendahl massacre. Their daughter Clartje, November 7th, 1742, 
married Anthony Van Slyck. 

Harmanus, son of Cornelius, August i6th, 1729, married first, 
Lydia, daughter of Harmanus Vedder ; secondly, in 1738, Sarah 
Vischer. He was an Indian trader. He left surviving him four sons 
and six daughters, of whom his daughter Elizabeth married Gerrit 
Van Slyck, and his daughter Maria married Peter Symonse Veeder. 

Cornelius, son of Cornelius, trader, March nth, 1733, married 
Jannetje, daughter of Abraham Truax. He left surviving him 
several children, of whom his daughter, Gertrude, married John Lam- 
bert, the renowned schoolmaster of Schenectady, who taught the 
boys of a generation, now all passed away, how to become men. 
Some of his pupils subsequently became distinguished as men of 
mark in church, law and state. 

Albert, son of Cornelius, September 17th, 1733, married Sarah, 
daughter of Jan Danielse Van Antwerpen. They had three daugh- 
ters, viz : Clara, Agnes and Lena. 

Peter, son of Cornelius, August 30th, 1734, married Angelica, 
daughter of Dominie Reinhard Erickson, pastor of the Dutch church 
of Schenectady from 1728 to 1736. They had three sons and four 
daughters, of whom their son Cornelius, March 30th, 1764, married 
Catarina, daughter of Peter Veeder ; and their son Adrian married 
Annatje, daughter of William Lighthall. Their daughter Clara 
married John Steers, and their daughter Annatje married Johannes 
Barhydt. 

Col. Jacobus (James), son of Captain Harman, the oldest son of 
Jacques, was born May 28th, 1704. He married Catalina, a daughter 
of Samuel Bradt, September 2d, 1732. He was commanding officer 
of Schenectady in 1754, a member of the provincial assembly in 
1750, also in 1771. His son Harmanus, born August 5th, 1733, 
married Anna, a daughter of Alexander Glen, September 26th, 1767. 
His daughter Annatje, married Philip Ryley. 

Adam, another son of Captain Harman, born March 5th, 1721, 
married September 19th, 1747, Catharina, daughter of Jan Baptist 
Van Eps, and their son Harmanus married Maria, a daughter of Isaac 



236 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY^ 

Vrooman, December 5th, 1771, by whom he had a son named Adam, 
who removed to Montgomery county. 

Adam also left a daughter, a sister of Harmanus, named Helena, 
born August 5th, 1759, who married Samuel Thorn, Esq. They 
were the parents of Jonathan Thorn, a gallant lieutenant in the 
United States navy, who distinguished himself under Decatur in the 
war with Tripoli ; and was one of the daring party that retook and 
destroyed the frigate Philadelphia under the guns of the Tripolitan 
batteries. He lost his life in the command of the exploring expe- 
dition sent out by John Astor to the Columbia river. (For particu- 
lars, see Irving's history of that memorable adventure.) They were 
also the parents of Herman Thorn, the millionaire of New York, 
and several other much-respected children. 

Marten, the third son of Jacques Cornelise, married, March 23d, 
1 701, Margaret Gerritse Van Vranken. They had several children, 
viz : Jacob, Margaret, Ariantje, Susanna and Petrus, the last born 
October 30th, 1709, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Jesse De 
Graff, April 9th, 1738. He was a captain in Colonel Abraham 
Wemple's company of the Revolutionary War. 

During the eighteenth century there came to Schenectady these 
men whose names were gathered by Prof. Pierson from the church 
records of Schenectady and Albany, and to whose distinguished ser- 
vice the historian, Judge Sanders, has rendered just and generous 
tribute. 

Johannes Quackenbos, son of Peter of Albany, born in 1662, mar- 
ried, October 20th, 1700, Anna, daughter of Johannes Clute of 
Niskayuna. 

Caleb Beck, settled at Schenectady in 1703. Some of his descen- 
dants became distinguished for talents and high literary attainments, 
among the noblest sons of our state. He married Ann Harley, at 
New York, November 2d, 1703. His house and lot was on the 
southeast corner of Church and Union streets, where he kept a hotel, 
and, after his death in 1733, his wife, at the same point, continued 
the business, together with trade in groceries and dry goods until 
her decease. He was the ancestor of Theodore Romeyn Beck, 



GENEALOGY. 237 

Isaac Van Valkenburg, son of Joachim of Albany, married May 
1 2th, 1705, Lydia, daughter of Jacques Van Slyck. On the 6th of 
September, 1712, he received a conveyance from Carl Hansen Toll 
of a lot on the south side of Union street, including the Court House 
lot, 100 feet front by 210 feet deep, for the sum of ^50, some evi- 
dence of the comparative value of real estate and money in those 
honest, early days. He left surviving him several children, but all, 
except his son Isaac, seemed to have removed to Albany county. 

Peter Clement was a step-son of Benjamin Roberts. In 1707 he 
and his brother Joseph received, under their step-father's will, each 
one-half of seventy-six acres of land at Maalwyck, including Bent's 
Island, In 17 10 Peter sold his half of the farm to Cornelius Viele 
for ^445. On the 26th of November, 1707, he married Anna Ruy- 
ting, and secondly, July 28th, 1721, married Anna, daughter of Arent 
Vedder. 

Class Gerritse Van Vranken came to the province of New York at 
a very early date ; the precise time cannot now be determined. He 
had two sons, Gerrit and Rykert. 

Gerrit Class, the oldest son, married Ariantje Uldrick, and as his 
widow married Geraldus Camberfort (Comfort) October i6th, 1692, 
we reach the conclusion that he did not live to a very advanced age. 
He left two sons and one daughter, Class, Uldrick and Maritje. He 
and his brother Rykert, in company with Class Jansen Van Bock, 
hoven, purchased land in what is now the town of Clifton Park, then 
known by the Indian name of " Canestigione," applied to a consider, 
able tract on both sides of the Mohawk river, in 1672, for 550 skip- 
pies of wheat. There Gerrit Class resided until his decease. 

Class Gerritse, oldest son of Gerrit Class, Jr., born in 1680, mar. 
ried, December 3d, 1704, Gertruy Quackenbos. He is the first Van 
Vranken that is. found settled in Niskayuna on the south side of the 
Mohawk river, where he bought land of Johannes Clute, March 6th, 
1709. 

Of the Vrooman family we have given the record of Adam and 
his sons, Parent and Walter. The rest of the lineage of this distin- 
guished and remarkable man is as follows : 



238 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Adam Vrooman was married three times. First, in 1678, to Eng- 
eltie, daughter of Harman Janse Ryckman ; second, in 1691, to 
Gretje Ryckman, his first wife's sister, and widow of Jacques Corne- 
lise Van Slyck ; thirdly, January 13th, 1697, to Grietje Takelse 
Heemstret in Albany. His descendants are very numerous, extend- 
ing far and wide throughout the Union, but mostly settled in the 
Mohawk and Schoharie valleys. He had nine sons and four daugh- 
ters, most of whom survived him. 

Barent, his oldest son, born in 1679, was carried captive to Can- 
ada in 1690. He married, June i8th, 1699, Catrina Heemstreet of 
Albany. He had a brewery on the north side of Union street, near 
to or upon the present crossing of the New York Central and Hud- 
son River railroad. He lived on the north corner of Centre and 
State streets. He died in 1746, leaving one son, Adam, and one 
daughter, Kngeltie. 

Wouter married, September 24th, 1707, Marytje, daughter of Isaac 
C. Hallenback of Albany. He died October 26th, 1756, leaving sev- 
eral children, of whom I can only particularize that his son Adam, 
born in 1708, married June 29th, 1742, Susanna, daughter of Jacob 
Swits. Adam, in 1757, lived in the ancient brick house at the 
Brahdywine Mills. He died July 30th, 1759, aged forty-three years. 

Isaac, son of Wouter, born November 13th, 1712, married, in 1744, 
Dorothea Van Boskerken of Bergen, N. J. He was a surveyor, 
judge of the court of common pleas, member of the provincial 
assembly in 1759, and member of assembly under the first state con- 
stitution in 1779, and died June ist, 1807, on his farm at the Brandy- 
wine Mills. 

Barent, another son of Wouter, born December 24th, 1725, mar- 
ried, January 12th, 1760, Alida, daughter of David Van Der Heyden 
of Albany. He became minister of the Dutch church, at Schenec- 
tady in 1754, and died November i6th, 1784. His widow died in 
1833, aged ninety-nine years. 

Engeltie, a daughter of Wouter, born June 12th, 1709, married 
Cornelius Veeder. 

Dorothea, another daughter, born October 5th, 17 14, married Gil- 
lis Truax. 



GENEALOGY. 



239 



Rachel, another daughter, born May 31st, 1724, married, first, 
Abraham Wemp, secondly, Abraham Fonda. 

Elizabeth, another daughter, born May 7th, 1732, married Abra- 
ham Switz. 

Pieter, the third surviving son of Adam, born May 4th, 1684, mar- 
ried, February 2d, 1706, Grietje, daughter of Isaac Van Alstyne of 
Albany. He settled with his father on what was called Vrooman's 
land in Schoharie. He died in 1771, having seven sons and five 
daughters. Pieter was the ancestor of all, or nearly all, the Vroo- 
man's living in Schoharie, Otsego and Montgomery counties. 

Parent, a son of Pieter, born P>bruary 19th, 1709, married Engel- 
tie, daughter of Tennis Swart; he died in 1782, leaving surviving 
six sons and three daughters. 

Engeltie, a daughter of Pieter, born May i8th, 1713, married 
David Ziele. 

Gertruy, also a daughter of Pieter, born September 3d, 1725, mar- 
ried Josias S warts. 

Catharina, also a daughter of Pieter, born March 29th, 1728, mar- 
ried Johannes Eawyer. 

Hendrick, son of Adam, (commonly called Captain Hendrick), 
born in 1687, married Maria, daughter of Parent Wemp. He was 
boss of " the carpenters who built the Second Dutch church of 
Schenectady in 1732, at seven shillings per day. This building was 
erected in the center of Church street, at the intersection of Church 
and Union streets. 

Parent, oldest son of Hendrick, born January 15th, 1710, married 
Volkie, daughter of Jan Parentse Wemple. After his death, in 1746, 
his widow married Jacob Alexander Glen, and lastly, she married 
Johannes Simonse Vrooman. Parent left but one child, called 
Angelica, born June 17th, 1747. 

Adam, second son of Hendrick, born April 2d, 17 16, married 
Anna, daughter of Abraham Mebie, February 7th, 1740. He removed 
to the banks of the Mohawk above Amsterdam, and left several chil- 
dren surviving him. 

John, third son of Hendrick, born April 4th, 17 19, married Jan- 
netje, daughter of Jacob Swits, November 26th, 1757. 



240 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Hendrick, son of Hendrick, born August 4th, 1722, married 
Neeltie, daughter of Peter Veeder, and left two children, Piecer and 
Maria. 

Maria, a daughter of Hendrick, born October 14th, 1705, married 
Isaac Swits. 

Volkie, another daughter, born March 29th, 1725, married Isaac 
Jacobus Swits. 

Jannetje, also a daughter, born 1779, married Simon Van Patten. 

Bartholomew, another son of Adam, born December 22d, 1700, 
married, October 7th, 1738, Catharina, daughter of Cornelius Slinger 
and widow of Hendrick Van Slyck. 

John, son of Bartholomew, born January 13th, 1745, married, 
March 28th, 1767, Margarita, daughter of Seth Vrooman. 

Engeltie, a daughter of Bartholomew, born September 3d, 1742, 
married Johannes Clute. 

Gezina, also a daughter, born April ist, 1746, married Albert 
Mebie. 

Seth, another son of Adam, born Jamiary 7th, 1705, married first, 
Gertruy Van Patten; second, January 25th, 1745, Eva, daughter of 
Jesse DeGraff, 

Adam, son of Seth, born March 5th, 1754, married first Engeltie, 
daughter of Simon Schermerhorn, by whom he had two da'ughters ; 
one, his daughter Alida, born December 24th, 1774, married Josias 
Swart. He died March 30th, 1852. His other daughter, Hiligonda, 
born October 27th, 1776, married Caleb Van Vorst. She died March 
25th, 1858. Adam married second, Nancy Van Vranken, sister of 
our old deceased citizen, Mans Van Vranken, by whom he also had 
two daughters. The oldest, Angelica, married Harman Bradt, the 
youngest, Harriet, married Daniel Barringer. 

Jacob Meese, another son of Adam, born July 3d, 1707, married 
"Sara," a daughter of Myndert Mynderse, October 3otli, 1742, seems 
to have left no issue. 

Christina, the oldest daughter of Adam, born October iStli, 1685, 
married Tennis Swart; Maria, another daughter of Adam, born 
September i, 1699, married Douw Fonda. 

Eva, also a daughter, married Joachim Kettlehuyn. 



GENEALOGY. 241 

Janneltie, another daughter, married March 26th, 1704, Captain 
Harman Van Slyck. 

John, the second and youngest son of Hendrick Meese and brother 
of Adam, married July 4th, 1680, Geesje, daugliter of Simon Vedder. 
He lived on the site of the depot of the New York Central and Hud- 
son River railroad ; he died in 1732, having had ten sons and six 
daughters, of whom the greater number survived him. 

Simon, the oldest son of Jan, born February 25th, 1681, married 
Eytje (Margaret), daughter of Jacob Delamont. He bought, in 17 10, 
of William Appel, the lot lying on the west side of the canal, 
between State and Liberty streets, the property belonging to the 
estate of John Jacob Vrooman, deceased. Simon left two sons, John 
and Jacob, and two daughters, Catharina and Maria. John Jacob 
Vrooman, born April 5th, 1763, was the grandson of Simon, and 
married x^niy Hicks, the widow of Peter Rowe, who had died April 
20th, 1806. 

Peter, son of John, born October loth, 1688, married in 17 16, 
Agnietje, daughter of Arent Vedder. He was killed at the Beuken- 
dahl massacre in 1748. He left surviving him several sons and 
daughters. 

Hendrick, son of John, born September 9th, 1690, married, Octo- 
ber 1 7 18, Engeltie, daughter of Cornelius Slingerland. In 1723 he 
owned a lot on the east corner of State and Washington streets, 
forty-five feet by 190 deep, which passed to his son Cornelius, who 
sold it to Samuel Arentse Bratt. 

Cornelius, son of Hendrick, born February 4th, 1722, married 
Margarita, daughter of Samuel Arentse Bratt, December i6th, i753- 

Simon, son of Hendrick, born in 1740, married, August 14th, 
1767, Margaret, daughter of Jacques Peek. They left several sons 
and daughters. 

Gezina, a daughter of Hendrick, born September 7th, 17 19, mar- 
ridd Simon Johannes Veeder. 

Eva, another daughter, born September 24th, 1724, married Johan- 
nes Pieterse Van Antwerpen. 

Jannetje, also a daughter, born November 3d, 1727, married Jellis 
Fonda. 



242 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Maria, another daughter, born January 30th, 1732, married Ahas- 
ueras Marcellis. 

Jacob, another son of Jan, born December 28th, 1698, married, 
October 17th, 1725, Maritje, daughter of Abraham Groot. His 
house lot was on the north side of State street at the crossing. Being 
a carpenter, he was sent by Sir William Johnson to Onondaga, to 
build a fort for the Indians. He died April 20th, 1774. 

John, his son, born January 8th, 1726, married Clara, daughter of 
Hendrick Van Slyck. Hester, a daughter, married Jacobus Heem- 
street. Rebecca, another daughter, married Arent Marselis. Gessie, 
also a daughter, married Peter Steers. 

Maria, a daughter of Jan, the brother of Adam, born October 31st, 
1696, married Gysbert Van Brakel. 

Jannetje, also a daughter, born July 3d, 1682, married Arent Bratt. 

Engeltie, another daughter, born December 2 2d, 1692, married Jan 
Ryer Schermerhorn. 

Catharina, also a daughter, born May 12th, 1701, married Jacob 
Mebie. 

The following is the Van de Bogart stock, thoroughly colonial and 
Revolutionary. His people now living are as follows : 

Surgeon Van de Bogart left surviving him two sons and one 
daughter. 

Myndert, his oldest son, born May 3d, 1648, married Helena, 
daughter of Jacob Janse Schermerhorn, and sister of Ryer Schermer- 
horn, Sr. He came to Schenectady in 1680, and was a very active 
partisan in Leisler's time, who appointed him justice of the peace in 
1690. 

In 1686, in company with Robert Sanders of Albany, he pur- 
chased 12,000 acres of land in Dutchess county, including the site of 
the city of Poughkeepsie, and soon after removed with his family 
and settled upon the tract. 

Fraus, youngest son of Surgeon Van de Bogart, born August 26th, 
1643, married Ametje Tyerkse, and settled at Schenectady in 1680, 
where he was killed February 9th, 1690, by the French and Indians. 
His widow, March 25th, 1692, married Philip Harris of Albany. 

Fraus left surviving him two sons. Class and Tjerk. 



GENEALOGY. 243 

Class, the oldest son of Fraus, married December 31st, 1699, Bar- 
bara, daughter of Tekel Heemstreet of Albany. 

Fraus, sou of Class, born August 22d, 1703, married November 
8th, 1726, Hesther, daughter of Abraham Groot. 

Takerus, another son of Class, born March 23d, 171 7, married 
February 2d, 1744, Neeltje, daughter of Arent DeGraff. He lived 
on the north side of Front, opposite the north side of Church street, 
where the residence of Henry Rosa, Esq., now stands. Takerus 
died in 1799, a Colonial and Revolutionary soldier, among the best 
of the military engineers of his day. 

Class, another son of Class, born June nth, 1727, married, August 
8th, 1752, Rachel, daughter of Joseph Yates. He left four children: 
Nuna, born September 12th, 1753, married to Abraham Lighthall ; 
Fraus, born February 23d, 1755 ; Joseph, born November 2:st, 1756, 
and Class Frausen, born March 4th, 1759. 

Anna, a daughter of Class, born November lotli, 1700, married 
Abraham Lighthall. 

Maria, another daughter of Class, born October 28th, 1705, mar- 
ried Pieter Veeder. 

Margaret, also a daughter of Class, born February 9th, 1709, mar- 
ried Alexander Vedder. 

Jillistje, also a daughter of Class, born March 6th, 17 n, married 
Johannes Hall. 

Sara, another daughter of Class, born February 28th, 17 14, mar- 
ried xA.rent A. Vedder. 

Tjerk Frausen, son of Fraus, Sr., married Margaret, daughter of 
Harmanus Veeder. 

Harmanus Fraus, son of Tjerk, born July 21st, 1721, married May 
i8th, 1745, Catharina, daughter of Daniel Danielse Van Antwerp. 

Nicholas, a son of Harmanus, born December nth, 1751, seems to 
have left no issue. 

Margaretta, a daughter of Harmanus, born July 6th, i755) mar- 
ried first Adam Kittle, who was killed in the Revolutionary War^ 
and secondly, one Williams. She then removed to Upper Canada. 

Nicholas, another son of Tjerk Frausen, born May nth, 17231 
married January 9th, 1747, Ariantje Schermerhorn ; secondly, in 



244 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

July, 1753, married Anna Van Voast. He left surviving him two 
sons, Tjerk and Fraus, and two daughters, Rachel and Margaret. 

Jan Pieterson Mebee who came in 1684 had the following descen- 
dants : 

Jan Pieterse Mebie came to Schenectady in 1684. He married 
Anna Pieterse, daughter of Pieter Jacobse Borsboon, one of the origi- 
nal proprietors of Schenectady. His home in the village was on the 
east side of Church street, next north of the Dutch church lot, cover- 
ing the premises now severally owned by Mrs. John A. Washington 
and Mrs. Benjamin. He also owned land on the third flat, on the 
south side of the Mohawk river, eight miles above Schenectady. 

In 1697, Rode, called by the Christians, Dirk, a Mohawk sachem, 
with the consent of all the other Mohawks, granted a piece of 
ground containing eighty acres, lying on both sides of Schoharie 
creek, commonly known by the name of " Kudarodae," to Jan' 
Pieterse Mebie, in consideration that his wife " is something related 
to the Mohawk castle." 

Jan Pieterse died April 8th, 1725, leaving surviving him three 
sons and five daughters. 

Pieter, the oldest son of Jan, born January 20th, 1696, married, 
June 1 2th, 1 72 1, Susanna, daughter of Arent Vedder. He settled 
on the north side of the Mohawk river, on the north side of " Arent 
Mebie's Kil," just north of the stone bridge on the New York Cen- 
tral and Hudson River railroad. He left surviving him several sons 
and daughters. 

Jan, son of Pieter, born January loth, 1728, married, December 
13th, 1755, Alida, daughter of Simon Toll. He died November 
24th, 1796. He left surviving him several sons and daughters. 

Harmanus, son of Pieter, born October 9th, 1737, married, Janu- 
ary 8th, 1 76 1, Susanna, daughter of Barent Wemple. He left one 
son, Peter, and two daughters, Debora and Margaret. 

Arent, son of Pieter, born in 1739, married, December 2 2d, 1764, 
Sarah, daughter of Josias Swart, and left three children, Pieter, 
Josias and Susanna. 

' Peter, a son of Pieter, born November 14th, 1742, married, July 
nth, 1767, Alida, daughter of Harmanus Peek. They became, by 



GENEALOGY. 



245 



removal, a Schoharie family. He left one son, Harmanus, and two 
daiio-hters, Sarah and Maria. 

Abraham, the second son of Jan Pieterse, born June 26th, 1695, 
married, June loth, 1718, Annatje, daug-hter of Albert Vedder. He 
secondly married, March 30th, 1752, Catalina Roseboom of Albany. 
He was a blacksmith, and lived on the lot next northerly to the 
Dutch church, before mentioned, as belonging to his father, Jan. It 
was in his barn, the identical one now standing on the premises of 
Mrs. Park Benjamin, where, on the i8th day of July, 1748, Colonel 
Jacob Glen of Scotia, and his rescuing party of about eighty citizens, 
deposited twenty-six of their friends, slaughtered at Beukendahl, in 
two parallel rows, to be claimed and removed by their friends and 
relatives. 

Albert, son of Abraham, born February 20th, 1738, married 
Engeltie, daughter of Bartholomew Vrooman, December 20th, 1760. 
He had several children, but the family removed to Tryon county, 
to that part now known as Montgomery county (old Canajoharie). 

Catharina, a daughter of Abraham, born August 6th, 1720, mar- 
ried Johannes Volkertse Veeder. 

Anna, another daughter, born September ist, 1722, married Adam 
Hendrickse Vrooman. 

Maria, another daughter, born November 23d, 1724, married Abra- 
ham Fonda. 

Eva, third daughter, born April 20th, 1727, married Gerrit Van 
Antwerpen. 

Engeltje, another daughter, born April 13th, 1735, married Hen- 
drick Van Dyck. 

Margarietje, fifth daughter, born August 23d, 1740, married 
Johannes R. Wemple. 

Jacob, the third son of Jan Peterse, born March ist, 1698, married 
August 7th, 1725, Catharina, daughter of Hendrick Vrooman. He 
inherited, by his father's will, one-half of the old homestead farm on 
the third flat, on the south side of the Mohawk. His house, still 
standing, is occupied by his great grandson, Simon Mebie. Jacob 
died April i8th, 1755, leaving three sons and three daughters. 



U6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

John, his oldest son, born May ist, 1738, married, December 26th, 
1760, Cornelia Hagadom. He died July nth, 1763, apparently 
without issue. 

Cornelius, his second son, born in March, 1741, married Novem- 
ber 19th, 1767, Hesther, daughter of Abraham Groot. He died, 
leaving surviving two sons and five daughters. 

Major Jacob C, oldest son of Cornelius, born May 31st, 1772, 
married, January 20th, 1793, Eva, daughter of Simon Van Patten. 
He lived on the old homestead in Woestyne. He was killed Decem- 
ber 4th, 1823, "^y hi^ loaded wagon passing over his body on the 
way to Albany." The Major left several children, but we will only 
mention his oldest son, Simon, born August 31st, 1805, married, 
May 7th, 1827, Hannah Marlett, and now resides upon the old home- 
stead. 

Abraham, the third son of Jacob, Sr., born January 4th, 1778, 
died September 2 ist, 1810, without issue. 

Catharina, the oldest daughter of Jacob, Sr., born July 17th, 1768, 
married Nicholas J. Van Patten. 

Willemjsie, another daughter, born February 4th, 1774, married 
Johannes J. Bratt. 

Margarita, third' daughter, born March 3d, 1776, married Nicho- 
las A. Bratt. 

Annatje, another daughter, born February 20th, 1780, married 
Nicholas P. Van Patten. 

Hester, fifth daughter, born JMay 9th, 1782, married Jellis Swart. 

Johannes Clute, ancestor of all the Clutes in this county, who 
settled in Niskayuna in 1684, has the following lineage : 

Johannes Clute settled in Niskayuna in 1684, on lands he received 
by will from his rich uncle. Captain Johannes Clute of Albany. He 
married Baata, daughter of Gerrit Van Slichtenhorst and grand- 
daughter of Brant Arantse Van Slichtenhorst, who was director 
(head man), of the colony of Rensselaerwyck in 1646, and whom, I 
have had occasion to remark, proved to be a foeman worthy of Gov- 
ernor Stuyvesant's most bitter animosity. She was also the grand- 
daughter of the indomitable Colonel Philip Pieterse Schuyler. In 
1692, her husband Johannes, being a prisoner in Canada, this remark- 



GENEALOGY. 247 

able woman, with great adroitness, managed all his business affairs. 

Johannes Clute died November 26th, 1725, and was buried in Nis- 
kayuna. He left surviving him three sons and five daughters. Clute 
is a prominent name in Schenectady. 

Jacobus, his oldest son, married, April 12th, 1707, Gertrude Van 
Vranken. 

Nicholas, his son, born May 20th, 1725, married Clartje, daugh- 
ter of Johannes Heemstreet. 

Johannes, another son, born November 15th, 17 19, married, Octo- 
ber 6th, 1752, Jannetie Ouderkerk. 

Gerrit, also a son, born July loth, 1709, married, September 22d, 
1732, Maritje Heemstreet. 

Peter, another son, born August 12th, 1722, married, May 7th, 
1 761, Lea Hagadorn. 

Gerrit, another son of Johannes Clute, born January ist, 1697, 
married, May 28th, 1725, Machtelt Heemstreet. 

John, his son, born July loth, 1726, married, January 17th, 1754, 
Catrina, daughter of Abraham Lansing of Albany. 

Jacob, another son of Gerrit, born January i8th, 1736, married, 
June 1 2th, 1 761, Maayke Lansing. 

Dirk, also a son of Gerrit, married, April 6th, 1760, Annatje, 
daughter of Johannes Heemstreet of Albany. 

Gerardus, another son of Gerrit, born October 19th, 1735, married 
Alida, daughter of Nicholas Visscher of Albany. 

John, another son of Johannes Clute, born May 12th, 1700, mar- 
ried, September 5th, 1727. 

John, his son, born September 15th, 1728, married, September 
27th, 1752, Sarah, daughter of Abraham Van Arnham. 

Frederick Clute came to Niskayuna from Esopus, Ulster county, 
in 1703, and bought land of old Johannes Clute. What relationship 
(if any) existed between them, is unknown. He married Francytje 
Du Monds. 

John, oldest son of Frederick, married, December nth, 1726, 
Tanneke, daughter of Gillis Fonda of Schenectady. 

Jacob, second son of Frederick, married, November i6th, 1727, 
Maria Brower, in Albany. 



248 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

Pieter, another son of Frederick, born April 26th, 17 12, married 
Ariantje, daughter of Nicholas Van Vranken. 

Frederick, also a son of Frederick, married, May 22d, 1742, Mach- 
telt, daughter of Johannes Pieterse Quackenbos. 

Waldren, another son of Frederick, married Anna, in 1721. 

Margaritje, a daughter of Frederick, married Andries DeGraff. 

Anna Barbara, also a daughter, married Abram Fort. 

Helena, another daughter, married Johannes Quackenbos, Jr. 

Anna Catrina, also a daughter, born December 8th, 17 16, married 
Martin Van Olinda. 

Gerrit Marcellus, the right and original spelling of this name of 
the Spanish conquest, and who will be remembered as the Marselis 
whose wife and child were killed in the massacre, left no descendants 
in Schenectady that can be discovered from record. Ahasueras, his 
brother, came here in 1698, and was a cordwainer. As he had 
descendants in the Colonies and Revolutionary wars, his lineage is 
here given. 

Gerrit Marselis, son of Janse Marselis of Albany, married Bregie 
Haus in 1687, and the same year came to Schenectady. He, with 
his wife and one child, was killed in the massacre of February 9th, 
1690. One child, named Myndert, was saved, and was living at 
Schenectady in 1709. He married Fitje Oothout of Albany, May 
23d, 1 7 13. They had three sons and four daughters. This is yet a 
well known name in Schenectady. 

Ahasueras Marselis, brother of Gerrit, above named, moved to 
Schenectady in 1698. In 1697 he married Sara, daughter of Takel 
Heemstreet of Albany. He was by occupation a cordwainer. 

John, oldest son of Ahasueras, was born June 26th, 1698. He 
married, January 12th, 1725, Sara, daughter of Class DeGraff. He 
was a merchant, and owned the house and lot No. 23 Front street. 
He must have died before 1753, for his widow then occupied the 
property. 

Ahasueras, the oldest son of John, born June 26th, 1726, married, 
January ist, 1749, Maria, daughter of Hendrick Vrooman. 

Henry, a son of Ahasueras, born May 25th, 1753, hiarried Corne- 
lia Pootman, December ist, 1793. He died August 12th, 1821. 



GENEALOGY. 249 

She died January 3d, 1837. He lived on the north side of Front 
street, on the lot now occupied by his granddaughter, Mrs. J. W. 
Harman. Henry Marsellus left only one child, Maria, who married 
Hon. Richard McMichael, for the term of four years a senator of 
the State of New York. 

Nicholas, a son of Ahasueras, born August 15th, 1766, married, 
September 14th, 1788, Matilda, daughter of Isaac Rosa. He died 
August 1 2th, 1848, aged eighty-two years. 

John A., another son of Ahasueras, born June 8th, 1777, married, 
January 5th, 1800, Catharina, daughter of Jacob Schermerhorn. He 
died October 12th, 1845, aged sixty-eight years, leaving no issue. 
He was a Quaker, beloved by everybody, and died deeply regretted 
by all. 

Sarah, a daughter of Ahasueras, married, October 9th, 1763, Wil- 
liam lyighthall. 

Angelica, also a daughter, married Harmanus H. Van Slyck. 

Class, another son of John, Sr., cordwainer, married, April 30th, 
1757, Lena, daughter of Dirk Merselis. He is said to have been 
killed by lightning in 1766, while crossing the Mohawk river in a 
canoe. 

John, oldest son of Class, born January 27th, 1760, married Catha- 
rina, daughter of Isaac Vrooman. He lived in Ferry street, directly 
opposite of the Episcopal church, and died December 15th, 1833. 

Nicholas, his oldest son, born March, 1792, was a minister of the 
Reformed Dutch Church, and married Jane, daughter of Colonel 
Henry R. Teller. 

Laurence, another son of John, born February 23d, 1795, was liv- 
ing until recently, and was a very much respected gentleman in 
Montgomery county. 

Elizabeth, a da:ughter of John, born November 27th, 1785, mar- 
ried Jacob J. Clute. 

Lena, another daughter, born December nth, 1789, married Silas 
Andrews, a publisher, of Hartford, Connecticut. 

Sarah, also another daughter, born September 12th, 1800, married 
Rev. Aaron A. Marselis. 



250 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Nicholas, a son of Class, born September 14th, 1766, married, 
April 17th, 1795, Sarah, daughter of Petrus Clnte. He died Novem- 
ber 28th, 1845, aged seventy-nine years. She died March 28th, 1872, 
aged ninety-four years, five months, twenty-one days. They had 
children. 

Dirk, born May 6th, 1797, died September nth, 1832. 

Peter, born June 3d, 1801, father of Richard Marselis, Esq., of 
Schenectady. 

Helena, born August 2 2d, 1806, died young. 

Catharine, born January 22d, 181 1, married Jacob F. Clute, Esq.^ 
of Schenectady; died April 12th, 1846. 

John, born November 2d, 1816, who recently died and who, with 
much attachment, occupied the old homestead on P'ront street. 

Dirk, second son of Ahasueras, Sr., born January 5th, 1700, mar- 
ried, July 26th, 1726, Lysbet, daughter of Jan Baptist Van Eps. 

Helena, Dirk's daughter, born March 4th, 1732, married Class 
Marselis. 

Catharine, another daughter, born February 15th, 1736, married 
Pieter Clute. 

Gysbert, also a son of Ahasueras, Sr., born June 4th, 1704, mar- 
ried, May 31st, 1730, Elizabeth, daughter of Arent Van Antwerpen. 

Arent, oldest son of Gysbert, born November 26th, 1732, married, 
December 23d, 1758, Rebecca, daughter of Jacob Vrooman. 

Captain Ahasueras, also a son of Gysbert, born April 12th, 1740^ 
married, September ist, 1765, Hester, daughter of Nicholas Visscher 
of Niskayuna. 

Takel, another son of Gysbert, born January ist, 1709, married, 
March i6th, 1738, Jacomyntje, daughter of Jan Baptist Van Eps. 

Isaac, also a son of Gysbert, born June 29th, 1723, married, August 
5th, 1748, Sarah, daughter of Wouter Swart. He was a merchant. 

Sara, a daughter of Gysbert, born June 9th, 1734, married 
Jacobus Van Sice. 

Class Andrease DeGrafF, 1688, left the following well authenticated 
lineage : 

Abraham, the oldest son of Class Andrease, born November 14th, 
1688, married, August 17th, 1725, Rebecca, daughter of Abraham 



GENEALOGY. 251 

Groot. He lived in the old red house, standing on the margin of 
the Sacandaga turnpike, near the residence of Phillip R. Toll, Esq., 
and his burying-ground lies not far from the rear of the house. 

In his family Bible, still in tolerable preservation, are transcribed 
the following entries on the fly-leaf, which entries are well sustained 
by traditionary history : 

" 1746, October 30th, Abraham DeGraff and his son William, were 
taken captive to Canada." 

" 1747, June 1 2th, Abraham DeGraff, died at Quebec, in Canada, 
and was buried there." 

" 1748, July 1 8th, Nicholas DeGraff, (son of Abraham), and twenty- 
six others, were murdered at Beukendahl by the savage Indians." 

Nicholas, the oldest son of Abraham, born May 26th, 1726, mar- 
ried Ariantje, daughter of John Schermerhorn, We have seen, by 
the Bible entry, that he was killed at Beukendahl, when only a little 
more than twenty-two years old. He left surviving him an infant 
son, Abraham, who, on the 29th of January, 1774, married Mar- 
garetta, daughter of William Schermerhorn. Desolate as his father's 
family was left, Abraham died June ist, 1810, leaving surviving him 
the following children : 

Elizabeth, a daughter, born July 23d, 1775, married Thomas 
Chapman. 

Tenneke, also a daughter, born' November ist, 1778, married Cor- 
nelius Viele. 

Rachel, another daughter, born March nth, 1781, died unmar- 
ried. 

Abraham, a son, born December i6th, 1790, died at the advanced 
age of nearly eighty-eight years. 

Lawrence, also -a son, born May 25th, 1793, is lately deceased. 

All the children of Abraham left numerous descendants, except 
Elizabeth and Rachel. 

Abraham, another son of Abraham, who died at Quebec, born 
August 24th, 1732, married, August 4th, 1753, Rachel, daughter of 
Johannes Clute. He died January 19th, 1756, leaving an only child, 
Abraham, born April 20th, 1754. 



252 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Cornelius, another son of Abraham, born November 23d, 1738, 
married, September i6th, 1769, Rebecca, daughter of Frederick 
\^an Patten. He was for thirty-two years Voorleger of the Dutch 
church of Schenectady, and stout lungs his old admirers claim for 
him. He lived on the south side of State street, in a house next 
west of Mrs. x\bel Smith's house and owned the lot on which her 
dwelling stands. In 1800 he removed to his farm in Glenville, near 
the location of the Beukendahl massacre, where he died July nth, 
1830, aged ninety-one years, seven months and seven days, having 
had three sons and three daughters. Albert W. Vedder, Esq., of 
Glenville, an aged citizen, was one of his grandchildren. 

William, also a son of Abraham, Sr., born November 20th, 1734, 
who was carried, with his father, captive to Canada, never returned. 
He probably died there, as his father did. 

Hester, a daughter of Abraham, Sr., born April i8th, 1728, mar- 
ried Philip Ryley. 

Jesse, son of Class Andriese, born August 4th 1688, married, 
October 20th, 1705, Aaltie Henmon in New York. He was carried 
away captive to Canada at one time, but returned. 

Daniel, son of Jesse, born May 26th, 1708, married, June 26th, 
1735, Gezina, daughter of Simon Swits. He died March 12th, 
1790, aged nearly eighty-two years. She died January 22d, 1801, 
aged eighty-eight years. 

Jesse, son of Daniel, born Januar>' 13th, 1745, married, November 
19th, 1774, Rachel, daughter of Abraham Fonda. They had only 
one child, Daniel, who died young. 

Simon, son of Daniel, born April 6th, 1753, married, December 
6th, 1779, first, Annatie, daughter of Simon Schermerhorn. She 
died September 21st, 1783, leaving one child, Gezina, who died 
young. He secondly married, April 12th, 1787, Jannete, daughter of 
Harmanus Bradt. Their children were : 

Daniel, born August 12th, 1788, who married a daughter of the 
old surveyor, Josias Swart ; also a son named Harmanus, born Janu- 
ary 8th, 1 791 ; also a daughter named Annatje, born August 23d, 
1794, and now the widow of Alexander Van Eps, and residing in 
Schenectady. 



GENEALOGY. 253 

Simon DeGraff's first wife, Jannete, was a sister of Maus and John 
Schermerhorn, deceased, aged citizens so long and favorably known 
in this commnnity. 

Isaac, son of Daniel, born November i6th, 1757, married, Decem- 
ber 19th, 1779, Susanna, daughter of John Baptist Van Eps. He 
died December 21st, 1844, aged eighty-seven years, one month and 
five days. 

Daniel, oldest son of Isaac, born June i6th, 1780. 
John, the second son of Isaac, born October 2d, 1783, died July 
2 2d, 1848. He was several times mayor of Schenectady, was for 
many years a successful merchant, and one of the firm of Walton & 
DeGraff, large contractors with the United States government, both 
by land and water, to forward supplies, ammunition, stores and 
necessities to its armies on the frontiers, and its navies on the western 
lakes. He also served the district in which Schenectady is located 
two terms in Congress. He died unmarried. 

Jesse, another son of Isaac, born January 9th, 1801, married 
Gerzena, daughter of Harman Vischer of Caughnawaga, Montgom- 
ery county. 

Gezina, oldest daughter of Isaac, born January 13th, 1788, married 
Abraham Oothout. This was the mother of our much esteemed 
citizen, G. Lansing Oothout, Esq. 

Susanna, another daughter of Isaac, born March 29th, 1793, mar- 
ried the late Peter Bancker. 

Annatje, also a daughter, born March loth, 1795, married Philip 
Toll, son of Carl Hansen Toll. 

Susanna, a daughter of Daniel, born May 5th, 1737, married 
Andreas Truax. 

Gezina, another daughter of Daniel, born November 6th, 1747, 
married Colonel Frederick Vischer of Caughnawaga. 

Alida, also a daughter, born March 9th, 1750, married Johannes 
Vedder. 

Arnout (Arnold), another son of Charles Andreas, born in 1694, 
married. May 13th, 17 15, Ariantje, daiighter of Class Vander Volgen. 
He died March 27th, 1731, after which his widow married Harmanus 
Vedder. 



254 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Class, son of Arnout, a carpenter, born March 14th, 17 16, married, 
first, Leah Gonsahis ; secondly, married Caty, daughter of Abraham 
Truax, February ist, 1754, in Albany. 

Manuel, his oldest son, and by his first wife, born February loth, 
1 751, married Rebecca Gonsalus. He was one of the first settlers of 
Amsterdam, Montgomery county. His farm was situated two miles 
east of that village. He has been succeeded on that farm by his son 
Manuel, born January 24th, 1789, and he by his son Manuel, the 
present owner. Manuel, the second, died in Amsterdam, July ist, 
1844, leaving several children. Philip Toll, Esq., of Glenville, mar- 
ried one of his daughters. 

Isaac, also a son of Class Andrese, born August 4th, 1691, mar- 
ried, August 18th, 1725, Debora, daughter of Jeremiah Thickstone. 
He was a carpenter and lived on the north side of Front street, a 
little east of Church street. 

Jeremiah, son of Isaac, born October 21st, 1727, married Annatje, 
daughter of Johannes Quackenbos, and left surviving him several 
sons and daughters. 

John, also a son of Isaac, born April, 1740, married, first, Novem- 
ber 1 2th, 1763, Rebecca, daughter of Gerrit Van Vranken ; secondly, 
married, July ist, 1769, Annatje, daughter of Harmanus Peek. 
He left surviving him three sons, respectively named Gerrit, Isaac 
and Harmanus. 

Andries, another son of Class Andries, born in 1699, married 
Neeltje, daughter of Daniel Van Antwerpen. He left but one child, 
Lysbeth, who married, February 5th, 1726, Philip Groot. 

Antje, a daughter of Class Andrese, born August 27th, 1693, mar- 
ried Cornelius Christianse. 

Sara, another daughter, born January 8th, 1696, married John 
Marselis. 

Eva, also a daughter, married Jacob Van Olinda. 

Elizabeth, another daughter, married Nicholas Stensil. 

Margarita, also a daughter, married Robert Yates. 

Frederick Gerritse, farmer, and Elizabeth Christianse, his wife, 
were residents of Schenectady in 1687. On September 9th, 1689, 
he conveyed to Myndert Wemp ten acres of land at Maalwyck and 



GENEALOGY. 



255 



Bent's Island, formerly belonging to Benjamin Roberts, always called 
by the old settlers " Bent Roberts," from which circumstance, the 
island in the Mohawk, three miles above the city and opposite the 
Viele farms, was so called. 

The lineage of the old war horse Stevens runs as follows : 

He was the great grandson of Jonathan Stevens of Connecticut. 
Nicholas Hendricus, oldest son of Jonathan, born November loth, 
1697, married, May 29th, 1730, Maria Phoenix. They had several 
children, but all died young and unmarried, except Arent and 
Johannes. 

Arent, the oldest son of Nicholas Hendricus, married, November 
20th, 1768, Jennetje DeSpitzer. He died in 1784, leaving surviving 
him the following named children : 

Jonathan, born January 27th, 1770. 

Thomas, born March 2 2d, 1772. 

Margaret, born May i8th, 1777. 

Maria, born December 31st, 1780. 

Hendricus, born April 27th, 1782. 

Nicholas, born February 26th, 1783, after his father's decease, 
and died in Schenectady, i8th of October, 1863. 

Arent, second son of Jonathan, born July 26th, 1702, married, first, 
January 3d, 1726, Maria, daughter of William Hall; she died 
December 23d, 1739, aged forty-two years. He married, secondly, 
February 4th, 1749, Mary Griffiths, widow of Lieutenant Thomas 
Burrows of the British army; she died July 2d, 1794, aged seventy- 
five years. Arent, himself, died May 15th, 1753- He owned lands, 
and for some time resided at Canajoharie. He often acted as Indian 
interpreter, and was also employed by Sir William Johnson in 
negotiations with the different tribes. 

Captain Jonathan Stevens, the oldest son of Arent, born December 
I St, 1726, was killed at the battle of Lake George, September 
8th, 1755, a few miles from the fort, in a disastrous ambuscade, 
where the noble King Hendrick, the chivalric and generous Colonel 
Ephriam Williams, the founder of Williams College, and the brave 
Captains McGinnis and Stevens, both of Schenectady, fell, almost 
side by side. 



256 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

It was of the two last that Sir William Johnson, in his official 
report of the battle and the capture of Baron Dieskaw, wrote : 
" Maginnis and Stevens fought like lions." Captain Jonathan was 
only twenty-eight years old when he so desperately lost his life, and 
was unmarried. 

Arent's other children were named as follows : 

Catarina, born August ist, 1729, died August 27th, 1790. 

William, born September loth, 1732. 

Nicholas, born November 14th, 1734. 

Johannes, born July 31st, 1736. 

Jacobus, born December 13th, 1739. 

Second set of children : 

Maria, born October 20th, 1750, married John Stuart. 

Richard, born December 10th, 1752, died in 1800. 

Anna, born April 22d, 1755, married Philip Franskel. 

The Van Dykes are as follows : 

Jacobus Van Dyck, physician and surgeon, son of Cornelius Van 
Dyck of Albany, also a physician and surgeon, married, October 25th, 
1694, Jacomytje, daughter of John Alexander Glen of Scotia, where, 
upon, immediately after that, he settled at Schenectady. He was 
surgeon of the fort there. His house and lot were on the west side 
of Church street, fifty feet north of State street. 

Cornelius, son of Jacobus, born August 28th, 1698, became also a 
physician and surgeon, and married, first, November 12th, 1721, 
Maria, daughter of Jan Pieterse Mebie, and secondly, Margaret, 
daughter of Arent Bratt, March i6th, 1738. He died February 15th, 
1759, aged about sixty-one years. He left surviving him several 
children, viz : 

Elizabeth, born September 8th, 1722, married Harmanus Bratt. 

Johannes, born May 24th, 1724, removed to Canajoharie. 

Jacobus, born March 17th, 1726. 

Hendricus, born August 29th, 1731, married Engeltje Mebie, 
daughter of Abraham INIebie, June 8th, 1753. 

Jacomyntje, born September i6th, 1733, married John Baptist 
Wendell. 



GENEALOGY. 257 

Cornelius, born October 8th, 1740, married, February 20th, 1762, 
Tannake, daughter of Joseph Yates. In the Revohitionary War he 
was lieutenant-colonel of the First New York Regiment of Conti- 
nentals, commanded by Colonel Gosen Van Schaick of Albany, and 
when Van Schaick became brigadier, Van Dyck was its colonel. 
During the whole war " this veteran First " was distinguished as one 
of the best disciplined and most gallant regiments of the whole 
army, and was engaged in many battles. He is but a tame student 
of history who cannot follow it through the capture of Burgoyne, 
the storming of Stony Point, and the final assault on Yorktown. So 
great was the admiration of General Gates for the heroism of these 
veterans, that after the surrender at Saratoga, out of his whole army 
he selected Nicholas Van Rensselaer, one of its captains, to carry the 
intelligence of Burgoyne's capture to the anxious citizens of Albany. 
Colonel Van Dyck was the grandson of John Alexander Glen of 
Scotia, and lived in the old Van Dyck residence on Church street. 
He died June 9th, 1792, leaving no issue surviving him. 

Cornelius Van Dyck was with Stevens, McGinnis and others; the 
bravest that Schenectady gave to her country. 

Johannes Guderkirk, son of Janse of Albany, came to Schenec- 
tady in 1695, and on the 20th of May of that year married Neeltje 
Class, widow of Hendrick Gardenier. His wife owned a lot of 100 
feet front on the north side of Union street, one-half of which is 
now included in the Dutch church lot, and the other half owned by 
Aaron Barringer, Esq. To give some evidence of the value of lots 
for some time after the burning and desolation of Schenectady, this 
whole lot, then vacant, was valued at fifteen beaver skins, or $48. 
Guderkirk left surviving him four daughters. His descendants, it is 
to be regretted, are not on record. 

The descendants of Carel Hansen Toll, 1706, are as follows : 

Captain Daniel Toll, the oldest son of Carel Hansen, born July 
nth, 1691, married, September 8th, 171 7, Grietje, daughter of Sam- 
uel Bratt. She was born March 24th, 1686; died March 22d, 1743. 
Captain Toll made his will in 1747, and was killed July i8th, 174S5 
together with his hired man. Dirk Van Vorst, who were hunting for 
his strayed horses. They were found barbarously murdered by the 



258 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

French and Indians, at a place called the " Klaykuil," about one- 
third of a mile north of the point of the Beukendahl massacre. 
They were the first victims of that heart-rending slaughter. 

John, the oldest son of Captain Daniel, ^born August 13th, 17 19, 
married Eva Van Patten, December 23d, 1742, and died December 
31st, 1746, about two years before his father was killed, leaving sur- 
viving a son. 

Carel Hansen, born February loth, 1746, who married, January 
loth, 1768, Elizabeth, daughter of Philip Ryley. He died August 
26th, 1832. She died October 25th, 1839. 

Hesther, his oldest child, born July 14th, 1768, married, first, John 
Teller, May 25th, 1787 ; secondly, Frederick Van Patten. 

Eva, another daughter, born October 5th, 1771, married John C. 
Vedder. 

Rebecca, also a daughter, born April ist, 1778, married David 
Prime, Esq. She died December 25th, 1867, aged nearly eighty-nine 
years. 

Rev. John Toll, the oldest surviving son, born September 13th, 
1780, married January 31st, 1802, Nancy, daughter of Parent ]\Iyn- 
ders. He graduated at Union College in 1799, and entered the min- 
stry of the Reformed Dutch Church. He died on his farm, the old 
Carel Hansen homestead, October 21st, 1849, leaving surviving him 
a son, Philip Riley Toll, born February 8th, 181 1, and a daughter, 
Sarah Jane, born September 8th, 1815. 

Sarah, another daughter of Carel Hansen, born September 21st, 
1783, married Arent Marselius. 

Hannah, also a daughter, born March 17th, 1788, married Simon P. 
Van Patten. 

Philip, the youngest son of Carel Hansen, born May i6th, 1793, 
married Nancy, daughter of Isaac DeGraff, and sister of the late 
John DeGraff. He died August 17th, 1862. 

Simon, the second son of Carel Hansen, Sr., born May 8th, 1698, 
married Hester, daughter of Isaac DeGraff, June 13th, 1731. He 
died in 1777, and his wife in 1793. 

Elizabeth, his oldest child, born October 31st, 1731, married John 
Fairly. 



GENEALOGY. 259 

Carel Hansen, the oldest son of Simon, born September 2d, 1733, 
married Maria Kettle, October 2d, 17 59- He left one son and three 
daughters, none of whom seem to have remained in Schenectady 
county. 

Alida, daughter of Simon, born September 23d, 1735, married 
Johannes Mebie. 

Annake, also a daughter, born December 2ist, 1737, married Wil- 
liam Kettle. 

John, a son of Simon, born July 24th, 1743, married, December 
22d, 1764, Catharina, daughter of Arent Veeder. This was the 
father of our eccentric but respected citizen, Daniel J. Toll, a physi- 
cian, born, March 3d, 1776, who married, June 20th, 1801, Catalina 
Wemple. He died April, 1849, leaving no issue. 

Jesse, also a son of Simon, born May 18th, 1746, married Maria 
Viele, He removed to, lived and died in Saratoga county. 

Eva, another daughter, born January 15th, 1749, married Lodovi- 
cus Viele. 

Daniel, the youngest son of Simon, born October 27th, 1751, mar- 
ried, July 2d, 1775, Susanna, daughter of Isaac Jacobse Swits. This 
was the grandfather of our deceased citizen, Col. Abram W. Toll, 
and of his active brothers, Charles H. and Daniel Toll, Esq. 

Breje, a daughter of Carel Hansen, Sr., born April 18th, 1703, 
married, November 26th, 1741, Adrian Van Slyck, who was killed at 
the Beukendahl massacre, July 18th, 1748. This was a grandson of 
the old proprietor, Jacques Van Slyck. 

Lysbeth, also a daughter, born January 29th, i 706, married Pieter 
Cornee, December ist, 1734. Cornee was a Frenchman, and a car 
penter by occupation. He built the preeckstoel (pulpit) of the 
Dutch church of 1734 for /"20. He owned, in 1738, a house and lot 
on the south side of State street, where the New York Central and 
Hudson River railroad now crosses. 

The descendants of the famous Johannes Mynderse are as follows : 

Myndert, his oldest son, born January 29th, 1706, married, January 
15th, 1736, Maria, daughter of Jan Barentse Wemp. _ He inherited 
from his father, the premises now 93 State street, and land east of 
it. He died in 1763. 



26o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Barent, son of Myndert, born February 6th, 1747, married Decem- 
ber 2d, 1770, Jannetje Van Vranken. He died August 30th, 1815. 

Colonel Johannes, son of Myndert, born October i8th, 1741, mar- 
ried Annatje, daughter of Simon Vedder. He died October 29th, 
1 815, aged seventy-four years and four days. She died March 9th, 
1825. He left surviving him, Simon, a son, born June loth, 1787. 
He died unmarried. 

Barent, another son, (physician), born July 17th, 1790, married, 
first, Catharine Douw Ten Eyck of Albany ; secondly, Sarah, daugh- 
ter of Jacob Kip, leaving surviving him one son, named Aaron. Dr. 
Mynderse died March 8th, i860. 

Aaron, also a son, born September 3d, 1793, married Anna M., 
daughter of Rev. Herman Vedder, of Gallatin, Columbia county. 
He died September 24th, 1834, leaving one son and three daughters. 

Gertrude, a daughter of Myndert, born July nth, 1736, married 
Peter Van Der Volgen. 

Margaret, another daughter, born May 24th, 1744, married Tennis 
A. Swart. 

Margaret, daughter of John, the first settler, born September 28th, 
1740, married Pieter Groenendyk. 

Rynier (merchant) son of John, born October 6th, 1710, married, 
March 25th, 1743, Catharina, daughter Lourens Class Van Volgen. 
His father gave him a house and lot on State street, next east of his 
brother Myndert's lot ; also a lot on the west corner of State street 
and Mill Lane, on which stood his dwelling house in 1781. He 
made his will April 7th, 1784, and died soon afterwards. 

John, son of Rynier, born December 25th, 1743, married Catha- 
rina, daughter of Joseph R. Yates, March 18th, 1758. He died Sep- 
tember 6th, 1819, aged nearly seventy-six years, leaving surviving 
him, one son, Joseph, born September 23d, 1770, who died Septem- 
ber 17th, 1830, aged sixty years, and unmarried; also one daughter, 
Catharina, born September 6th, 1772, married to Hon. Henry Yates. 
She was the mother of our late deceased citizen, Stephen Yates, Esq. 

Susanna, a daughter of Rynier, married April i8th, 1746, Volekert 
Veeder. 



GENEALOGY. 261 

Gertrude, also a daughter, married, November 27th, 1748, William 
Mead, M. D. 

Lawreuce, another son of Rynier, born October 12th, 1751, mar- 
ried, December 8th, 1785, Christina, daughter of Nicholas DeGraff. 
He died August loth, 1789, leaving two daughters surviving him, 
named Margaretta and Catalyje. 

Jacobus (James), the third son of Johannes, born iVpril 22d, 1709, 
married, April 22d, 1743, Sarah, daughter of Robert Yates. He was 
a citizen much esteemed, and a member of the provincial assembly 
in the years 1752, 1768 and 1769. He owned the lot next west of 
his brother Rynier's, corner of State street and Mill lane, being the 
property lately owned by G. Q. Carley, deceased, and now partly 
occupied by Church street continued. He also owned the lot oppo- 
site the court house, on Union street, probably inherited by his wife 
from her father, Robert Yates. He left surviving him two children. 

Gertrude, his daughter, born September 8th, 1745, married Myn- 
dert Weniple. 

Margaret, another daughter, born May 24th, 1759, married John 
C. Yates. 

The Fonda stock from Jellis, who came here in 1700, is as follows : 

Douw, the oldest son of Jellis, born September ist, 1700, mar- 
ried, October 21st, 1725, Maritje, daughter of the heroic Adam Vroo- 
man. He removed from Schenectady in 1751, and settled at Caugh- 
nawaga. Standing on the flats between the present turnpike and the 
Mohawk river, was the large stone dwelling with a wing on each side. 
Here, in October, 1780, with a few domestics, resided this aged wid- 
ower. His three sons, John, Jellis and Adam, were living in the 
neighborhood. 

Major Fonda died June 23d, 1791, leaving a son, Douw, aged 
eighty years ; also a son Henry, who died at Caughnawaga, April 
4th, 1815, aged twenty-nine years, leaving a son and a daughter. 

Margaret, a daughter of Douw, and sister of Mary Jellis, born in 
1764, married John R. Yates, Esq., brother of Robert Yates, long a 
distinguished chief justice of the Supreme Court of the State of 



262 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

New York, and himself many years Surrogate of the County of 
Schenectady. 

Margaret Fonda was the mother of the late Giles F. Yates, and 
the grandmother of IMrs. Austin A. Yates. 

Margaretta, a daughter of Douw, born November loth, 1734, mar- 
ried Barent M. Wemple. 

Peter, another son of Jellis, the first settler, born March 6th, 171 1, 
married, June 27th, 1735, Maria, daughter of Daniel Van Antwerpen, 
and left only one child, born October 19th, 1736, named Rachel. 

Abraham, also a son of Jellis, Sr., born July 17th, 17 15, married, 
first, July 30th, 1746, Maria, daughter of Abram Mebie ; secondly, 
February 22d, 1755, Susanna, daughter of Alexander Glen; and 
thirdly, November 22d, 1774, Rachel Vrooman, widow of Abraham 
Wemp. Abraham Fonda lived in the house No. 27 Front street, 
built by himself in 1752, and now occupied by his great grandson, 
Nicholas Yates, Esq. He died Februarv' 13th, 1805, aged nearly 
ninety years, 

Rachel, his oldest child, born September 14th, 1748, married Jesse 
De Graff. 

Rebecca, another daughter, born June 7th, 1757, married, first, 
Nicholas. Yates ; secondly, Cornelius Van Vranken. She died 
March 7th, 1846, aged eighty-nine years. 

Jellis A. Fonda, a son of Abraham, born October 27th, 1759, mar- 
ried Elizabeth, daughter of Christopher Yates. He held the com- 
mission of lieutenant in Van Schaick's regiment, which he resigned 
for a captaincy in Colonel Willet's Independent Corps, under whom 
he served to the close of the war. He was for many years clerk of 
Schenectady county, and died August 27th, 1834. 

Alexander Glen Fonda, his son, born August 17th, 1785, was a 
graduate of Union College, and for many years a physician in 
Schenectady. He died INIarch 4th, 1869, aged nearly eighty-four 
years. 

Christopher, another son, died at Clairborne, iVlabama, August 
26th, 1845. 

Jane Helen, a daughter of Jellis, born March ist, 1795, married 



GENEALOGY. 263 

Rev. Nathan N. Whiting, and died at Williamsburgh, N. Y., April 
30th, 1852. 

Jacob Glen Fonda, another son of Abraham, born August 29th, 
1761, married, April 4th, 1784, Aletta Willet, in Albany. He was 
admitted to practice law in the Supreme Court as attorney, but 
abandoned that profession soon after 1800, and removed to his farm 
in Glenville. He was for many years employed as deputy clerk of 
Schenectady county, and died on his farm in West Glenville, Decem- 
ber 8th, 1859, aged ninety-eight. His son, Elbert Willet, born March 
4th, 1794, is still living. 

Jacob, another son of Jellis, Sr., born February nth, 1722, mar- 
ried, first, April 29th, 1748, Maria, daughter of Nicholas Van Patten; 
secondly, November 4th, 1758, Margaret Fort, widow of Peter Bosie. 
He died in 181 3, aged about ninety-one years. 

Rachel, his oldest child, born October loth, 1748, married Philip 
Viele. 

Rebecca, another daughter, born December 26th, 1753, married 
Gerrit Van Antwerpen. 

Major Jellis J., the only son of Jacob, born January 13th, 1751, 
married, first, November 5th, 1774, Maria Mynderse ; secondly, Cat- 
rina, daughter of Hendricus Veeder, in 1783. This was the heroic 
Jellis J., of the Revolution, one of the earliest, most stirring and 
unhesitating patriots of Schenectady. On the first report of a shot 
from Lexington, this young brave, who had already tasted military 
life, just married, and surrounded by the comforts of considerable 
wealth, immediately raised and commanded the company of Sche- 
nectady minute men, numbering more than 100 men. It is impos- 
sible in a short notice like this, to follow him in his varied exploits. 
He was always ready for duty, and prompt at the post of danger. I 
will illustrate, by one incident, the estimation in which his bravery 
was held. In 1777, when Sir William Johnson, with his Scotch 
retainers, had fortified themselves in "Johnson Hall," Generals 
Schuyler, Ten Broeck and Herkimer, with a large body of militia, 
went there to reduce them. When, out of the whole number, Gen- 
eral Schuyler selected Captain Fonda, from his known fearlessness 
of character, to command a forlorn hope of 200 men for the assault. 



264 -SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

of which his company of minute men formed one-half. The assail- 
ing forces were without cannon. But when this brave officer in the 
lead, under the eye and direction of the noble Schuyler, shouted on 
his column to the assault, with undaunted dash (for Fonda was in 
deadly earnest), Sir John immediately lowered his flag and surren- 
dered without firing a gun. Fonda was ever afterwards called, 
wherever known, one of the most fearless of men. 

Major Jellis J., died in 1839, aged about eighty-eight years. His 
wife Catrina died October 19th, 1828, aged nearly seventy-four years. 

His son Jacob, born March 2 2d, 1786, died in 181 7, leaving a son, 
whom I can trace no further. 

•Henry V. Fonda, another son, born August 20th, 1788, a graduate 
of Union College, and a successful legal practitioner at Schenectady, 
died March is.t, 1824, unmarried. 

Gerrit, also a son, born November 5th, 1790, was married and had 
several children. After his father's decease he moved west. 

ChristoiDher, his youngest son, born August 28th, 1795, was a grad- 
uate of Union College, and was admitted to the bar. He died 
unmarried in the year 1832, while temporarily engaged in some 
business south, in or near Baltimore. 

Helena, a daughter of Jellis, Sr., born April 2 2d, 1705, married 
Pieter Brower. 

Eva, another daughter, born October i6th, 1707, married Joseph 
Yates. 

Sarah, a third daughter, born May 3d, 1713, married Jacobus Van 
Vorst. 

The Quackenbos line from old Johannes of 1701, is as follows : 

Pieter, son of Johannes Pieterse, married, November ist, 1701, 
Neeltje, daughter of David Marinus, In 1773 he purchased lands of 
Edward Collins, on the Mohawk river, and removed into what is 
now Montgomery county. He died July 20th, 1748, and was the 
ancestor of the numerous Quackenboses west of Schenectady. 

David, son of Peter, born June 21st, 1702, married, May nth, 
1723, Annatje, daughter of Captain John Scott of the British army, 
the patentee of lands, running from Auries creek to the Yates and 
Fonda line, near the present village of Fultonville, containing many 



GENEALOGY 265 

thousand acres. According to tradition, David Ouackenbos was a 
man of fine personal appearance, and, for the times, of marked intel- 
ligence. 

Johannes, also a son of Johannes Pieterse, born January 4th, 1702, 
married, June 26th, 1731, Helena, daughter of Frederick Clute ; 
secondly, February 12th, 1755, Helen, daughter of Jacob Van Olinda. 
He died in 1760. 

Frederick, son of Johannes, Jr., born December 21st, 1737, mar- 
ried, December ist, 1768, Maria Sitterly. 

Francina, a daughter of Johannes, Jr., born December 25th, 1733, 
married Issac Van Vranken. 

Bata, another daughter, born October 19th, 1735, married Claas 
DeGraff. 

Annatje, also a daughter, born July 24th, 1748, married Jeremiah 
DeGraff. 

Abraham, also a son of John Pieterse, born November 3d, 1710, 
married, January nth, 1740, Bata, daughter of Pieter Ouderkirk. 
He died in 1761. His son, Johannes, born February nth, 1750, 
died July 28th, 1839, aged eighty-nine years ; his daughter Matilda^ 
born August 29th, 1761, married John Wood. 

Isaac, another son of Pieterse, born January 25th, 17 13, married, 
October 27th, 1737, Rebecca, daughter of Dirk Groot. 

Annatje, his oldest child, born July 6th, 1738, married Albert H. 
Vedder. 

Bata, another daughter, born August 2d, 1747, married Frederick 
Bratt. 

John, the only son of Isaac, born August 9th, 1750, married Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Cornelius Groot of Niskayuna. He lived at the 
junction of Lafayette and Liberty streets, where he owned a large 
section of land. He died July 28th, 1839, aged eighty-eight years, 
eleven months and nine days. His wife died May nth, 1835, in her 
seventy-ninth year. Maria, his only surviving child, born March 
i8th, 1799, married Abraham Oothout Clute, Esq., still a living link 
of Schenectady's precedent days. 

Gerardus, another son of John Pieterse, born March nth, 1721, 
married Elizabeth Van Vorst, April 25th, 1747. 



266 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

John G., son of the above, born September 9th, 1759, married 
Annatje Shannon. 

Sarah, a daughter of Gerrit, born February 7th, 1762, married 
Richard Van Vranken, Jr. 

Matilda, another daughter, born September 30th, 1764, married 
Peter Huyck. 

Rebecca, also a daughter, born August 6th, 1769, married Andrew 
Huyck. 

Angelica, another daughter, born December 27th, 1771, married 
Joseph Carley, Februaiy ist, 1789. These last were the parents of 
the late Gerardus Q. Carley, one of our distinguished merchants. 

Thomas Davids came to Schenectady in 1700. On the 14th of 
December, 1701, he married Catarina, daughter of Johannes Klein, 
and on the 14th day of May, 1731, his son, Ludovicus, married Maria, 
daughter of Peter Clement. 

Philip Bosie came to Schenectady in 1702, and September 2d, 
1704, married Margaret Bratt. 

Peter, the son of Philip, born June 30th, 1722, married, June 10th, 
1749, Margaretta, daughter of Nicholas Fort of Niskayuna. 

Maria, a daughter, born March 24th, 1751, married Fraus Veeder. 

Gertruy, another daughter, born December 26th, 1753, married 
Jesse Peek. 

The descendants of Caleb Beck, 1703, are as follows: 

Anna, his oldest daughter, born October 7th, 1704, married 
Jacobus Van Vorst. 

Elizabeth, another daughter, married John Fairly, who owned the 
lot on the east side of Church street, next south of his father-in-law's 
lot. 

Engel, also a daughter, born December 15th, 1715, married Isaac 
Abram Truax. 

Margaret, another daughter, married in 1751, John W. Brown, one 
of the first founders and a prominent member of the Episcopal 
church in Schenectady. 

Caleb, the only surviving son of Caleb, Sr., born May 24th, 17 14, 
married, November ist, 1747, Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham 



GENEALOGY. 267 

Truax. He was an attorney-at-law of considerable prominence, and 
died December 9th, 1787, aged nearly seventy-four years. 

Anna, his oldest daughter, born October 6th, 1748, married Peter 
Van Guysling. 

Angelica, another daughter, born April 5th, 1761, married Andrew 
Van Patten. 

Caleb, the only surviving son of Caleb, Jr., born October 2 2d, 
1758, studied law with his father, but never practiced ; his fortune 
was comfortable and his tastes were literary. In 1788 he was princi- 
pal of the Schenectady Academy, and died in October, 1798. His 
wife died August 23d, 1853. On the 26tli of August, 1790, he mar- 
ried Catharine Theresa, the accomplished daughter of the Rev. Dirk 
Romeyn, and in his short married life of nine years, he left surviv- 
ing him the following named sons, who all became distinguished in 
the various departments of science, law and military affairs, but are 
now resting from their labors in death. 

Theodorick Romeyn, oldest son of the last Caleb, born August 
nth, 1 791, died with a world-wide reputation as a man of science. 
He was the author of " Beck's Medical Jurisprudence." 

iVbraham, the second son, born October 2rst, 1792, after practicing 
law for some years in Schenectady, removed to St. Louis, Missouri, 
and rising high in his. profession for so short a residence, died there 
in 1821. 

John Brodhead, the third son, born September i8th, 1794, died at 
New York in 185 1. He was a distinguished physiciaii and professor 
in the New York Medical College, 

Nicholas Fairly, the fourth son, born November 7th, 1796 ; died 
June 30th, 1830 in Albany. He was a lawyer of excellent reputa- 
tion, and was at the time of his death adjutant-general of the state 
of New York, and had been since 1825. 

Caleb Lewis, (commonly written Lewis C.) M. D., born October 
4th, 1798, and died in 1852. He was professor of chemistry and 
natural history in Rutger's College, New Jersey, and is the author of 
several literary writings, and particularly of a folio volume of the 
mineralogy of New York. 



268 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The Clements (Peter, 1707) are as follows : 

Johannes, a son of Peter, born September 24th, 1732, married, 
July 24th, 1760, Jannetie Bradt. 

Peter, a son of John, born February 22d, 1761, married Alida, 
daughter of Gerrit Veeder. They had sons named Gerrit, John and 
Arent, and daughters Jannatje, Annatje and Maria. 

Joseph Clement, the brother of Peter, sold his one-half of the 
]\Iaal\vyck farm to Carel Hansen Toll for ;^400, March 17th, 17 12. 
He married Anna, daughter of Jacobus Peek. 

Jacobus, his son, born November 23d, 17 18, married, February 
27th, 1747, Jannetje Van Woert. 

Johannes, another son, born July 27th, 1723, married, December 
30th, 1753, Rachel Rudcliff of Albany. 

Lodovicus Cobes, another son, born November 30th, 1725, married 
Catalyntje Pootman. 

The numerous Van Vrankens that to-day people Niskayuna are as 
follows : As we have seen, this grand old Holland stock came to the 
New Netherlands at a very early date. The ancestor of all the 
Schenectady stock was Claas Gerritse, the first Van Vranken that 
settled in Niskayuna, and left the following lineage : 

Gerrit, son of the above named Gerrit Claas, born October 3d, 
1708, married, July 7th, 1738, Marytje, daughter of Johannes Fort. 

Abraham, son of Gerrit, born July 6th, 1750, married Gertruy 
Gout. He had one child, Elizabeth, born August 2d, 1790. 

Rebecca, daughter of Gerrit, born April 4th, 1739, married Johan- 
nes DeGraff. 

Johannes, another son of Gerrit, born October 25th, 1743, i^iarried, 
April 16, 1776, Gertrude Van Vranken. 

Ariantje, his daughter, born August 19th, 1781, married Andrew 
Yates. 

Rebecca, another daughter, married John D. Fort. 

Gerrit, also a son of Gerrit, born May 7th, 1741, married, January 
9th, 1 77 1, Gertruy Visscher. He died November i6th, 1785, leaving 
several children. 

Pieter, another son of Claas Garritse, born December 3d, i72r, 



GENEALOGY. 269 

married, May 3d, 1748, Neeltje, daughter of Dirck Groot. He died 
in 1809, having had the following children : 

Nicholas, born April 2d, 1749. 

Gerrit, born April 2d, 1758. 

Cornelius, born July 6th, 1760. 

Dirk, born January 19th, 1762. 

His daughter Elizabeth, married Eldert Tymesen, March 5th, 
1779. 

Isaac, also a son of Claas Gerritse, born May 2ist, 1726, married, 
February ist, 1754, Claartje Bradt ; secondly, he married, September 
1 2th, 1757, Francina, daughter of Johannes Quackenbos. 

Claas, son of Isaac, born August 5th, 1759, married February 14th, 
1785, Rachel Boom. He died September, 1839, aged nearly eighty 
years. 

Isaac, the son of Claas, born July 6th, 1789, married Maria Van 
Antwerp, and died August 30th, 1858, aged seventy years. 

Jacob, another son of Claas Gerritse, born June 22d, 1729, married, 
July 17th, 1758, Margarita, daughter of Cornelius Pootman. 

Claas, son of Jacob, born February 15th, 1761, married Eva, 
daughter of Cornelius Peek. He died July 20th, 1837, in his seventy- 
seventh year, and she died October 30th, 1837, in her seventy-seventh 
year. Jacob, their son, born March 15th, 1784, died May 24th, 1861, 
aged seventy-seven years, two months and nine days. 

Abraham, also a son of Claas Gerritse, married, November 19th, 
1742, Debora, daughter of Samuel Cregier. 

Claas, his son, born September 4th, 1743, married Gertrude Groot, 
and lived on his father's homestead farm on the Consaul road. 

Ariantje, a daughter of Claas Gerritse, born October 30th, 1710^ 
married Peter Clute. 

Magtelt, another daughter, born April 30th, 17 12, married Fraus 
Bovie. 

Maria, also a daughter, born December ist, 1723, married Johannes 
Claase Fort. 

Rykert Claase, the second son of Claas Gerritse, the first emigrant, 

married Hillegenda . He owned a house and lot in North 

Pearl street, Albany, which he sold in 1684, to Johannes Wendell. 



270 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

He and his brother Gerrit, in company with Van Boekhoven, in 1672, 
purchased land in what is now the town of Clifton Park. 

The Yateses, of English in name and origin, have by intermarriage 
become almost entirely Hollandized. All of the old stock in this 
valley came from Joseph Yates, who came over with Nichols, the 
English commander to whom Stuyvesant was compelled to surren- 
der. Yates came to Albany and was pensioned as a soldier of the 
king. He seems to have been purve^-or of Fort Orange, as he makes 
most earnest plea for his pay for wood, furnished to Fort Orange. 
Yates in Albany May 20th, 1730. Here will be traced only the 
Schenectady lineage of this old soldier of the king. Joseph was the 
progenitor of a numerous race now surviving in Albany, Montgomery 
and Schenectady counties and scattered from them all over the 
United States, 

The Schenectady descendants of Joseph can be therefore traced as 
follows : 

He left surviving him six children : Christoffel, born April i6th, 
1684; Robert, November 4th, 1688; Selia, born May 7th, 1693; 
Joseph, born March 17th, 1698, and Abraham, born March ist, 1704. 

Robert, son of the above Joseph, born November 4th, 1688, set- 
tled at Schenectady in 171 1, and on the 15th day of February, 1712, 
married Margaret, daughter of Claas De Graff. He was a merchant 
and also had a tan-yard on Mill Lane. He died March 4th, 1748, in 
his sixtieth year. His grave is in Vale Cemetery not far from State 
street entrance. 

Joseph, son of Robert, born July r2th, 17 14, married, September 
5th, 1737, Maria, daughter of John Dunbar. 

Robert, the oldest son of Joseph, born March 17th, 1738, married^ 
in 1765, Jannetje Van Ness in Albany, where he settled as an attor- 
ney-at-law, and became a member of the committee of safety, 
during our Revolutionary struggle for independence, and was a 
devoted patriot. He was a member of the convention that adopted 
the state constitution in 1777 ; was one of the first judges of the 
Supreme Court of this State and eventually its chief justice. He 
was a member of the Federal Convention of 1787, and of the State 
Convention called to ratify the Federal Constitution. He died Sep- 



GENEALOGY. 271 

tember 9th, 1801, aged sixty-three years, five months and twenty-four 
days. He left surviving one daughter, Maria, married to James 
Fairly, for many years clerk of the Supreme Court of the State of 
New York, and in the Revolutionary War was an aide-de-camp to 
Baron Steuben ; and three sons, one of whom, John Van Ness Yates, 
was a talented lawyer, residing in Albany, and was Secretary of State 
for the State of New York from April 24th, 1818, to February 14th, 
1826. He died January loth, 1839. 

Nicholas, another son of Joseph and Maria Dunbar, born Decem- 
ber 20th, 1752, married Rebecca, daughter of Abraham Fonda. He 
lived at No. 5 Church street. After his death his widow married 
Cornelius Van Vranken. Nicholas left surviving him four sons, 
respectively named, Abraham Fonda, Robert N., Isaac Glen and 
Joseph. 

Abraham, born February 7th, 1788, after his marriage, removed to 
Oswego county, and died there, leaving no offspring. 

Robert N., born November nth, 1789. During the War of 181 2 
this young man was appointed lieutenant in a rifle regiment of the 
United States army, and stationed at Fort Erie in Canada, when that 
fort was in possession of the Americans, under command of General 
Edmund P. Gaines, who sent him out from the fort at the head of 
a reconnoitering party, which was attacked by the enemy. In the 
skirmish he repulsed the enemy, but at the sacrifice of his own life. 
His body was brought back to the fort and forwarded to Schenec- 
tady for interment, where it is now deposited in the old Dutch 
church burying ground, sleeping with honor beside those of his pat- 
riotic ancestors. 

In the report of his death to the war department. General Gaines 
regrets his loss, and gives him the character of a brave, promising 
and excellent officer. 

Isaac Glen Yates, born August 23d, 1793, married a daughter of 
Frederick Rees of Glenville. He had several daughters and only 
one son, named Jacob, who removed to and settled in Illinois. Isaac 
was accidentally killed in Michigan, by falling from a railroad car 
while on his way to visit that son. 



272 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Joseph Yates, the youngest son of Nicholas, was the father of 
Nicholas A. Yates, and of Arthur Yates, scenic artist of the New 
York Central, and Hansen Yates of Front street. 

John, also a son of Joseph and INIaria Dunbar, born June 12th, 
1760, married Margaret, daughter of Jellis Fonda of Caughnawaga. 
He was the second surrogate of Schenectady and held the ofhce for 
many years, until his decease in 1826. 

Joseph, his oldest son, born October 4th, 1786, died June 12th, 
1837, unmarried, 

Giles Fonda, also a son, born November 8th, 1798, died unmar- 
ried. He was an attorney-at-law and an accomplished antiquarian. 
He succeeded his father in the office of surrogate, and held it for 
twenty years. 

Jane, a daughter of John, born in 1794, married Giles Yates, Esq., 
and died July 20th, 1848. 

Elizabeth M. Yates, born December ist, 1808, married John 1. 
Yates, Esq., who died December 3d, 185 1. This was the mother of 
Mrs. Austin A. Yates and ]\Iiss Elizabeth M. Yates, preceptress in 
Union school. 

Elizabeth, a daughter of Robert, the first Yates who settled at 
Schenectady, born January 7th, married Ephraim Smith. 

Maria, another daughter, born January 25th, 171 8, married Gerrit 
Van Antwerpen. 

Sarah, also a daughter, born August 19th, 1721, married Jacobus 
Mynderse. 

Joseph, the grandson of Joseph the ancestor, and son of Christoffel 
(Christopher) of Albany, married, January 17th, 1730, Eva, daughter 
of Jellis Fonda, and settled in Schenectady in 1734. He owned a 
large plantation reaching from Aesplaus Creek to Freeman's bridge, 
and was the largest slave owner in the count}'. 

Christopher, his oldest son, born July 8th, 1737, commonly called 
Colonel Stoeifel, married, October i6th, 1761, Jannetje, daughter of 
Andreas Bradt. He was a surveyor by profession ; served as a cap- 
tain under Sir William Johnson, and was wounded ; lieutenant- 
colonel of Second Regiment of New York under Colonel Abraham 
Wemple ; detached as assistant deputy quartermaster-general under 



GENEALOGY. 273 

Phillip Schuyler, and as a member of his staff retired with him at 
Saratoga when Gates took command. He was a member of the 
Provincial Congress of the Committee of Public Safety and of the 
first Board of Regents. He died in 1785. 

Joseph, his eldest son, born November 9th, 1768, married, first, 
September 3otli, 1791, Ann, widow of James Ellice ; secondly, Maria, 
daughter of John Kane, of Schenectady, and thirdly, Elizabeth 
De Lancey, daughter of John De Lancey, Esq., of Westchester 
county. He was originally an attorney-at-law of extensive practice ; 
was the first mayor of Schenectady, a state senator in 1807, judge of 
the Supreme Court in 1808, governor of the state in 1823-24, and 
died March 19th, 1837, full of honors, and with a distinguished 
reputation for industry and integrity. He had three children, all 
daughters. 

Helen Maria, the oldest, born September 28th, 1797, married 
Colonel John K. Paige, and died January 25th, 1829, before the 
decease of her father. 

Anna Alida, another daughter, born September 14th, 1806, mar- 
ried John D. Watkins, a citizen of Georgia. 

Jane Josepha, also a daughter, born November 6th, 181 1, married 
Samuel Niel of New^ York. 

Henry, also a son of Colonel Christopher, born October 7th, 1770, 
married Catharine, daughter of Johannes Mynderse, October 24th, 
1 79 1. He was an attorney-at-law, for several terms a state senator, 
and at one time a member of the council of appointme±-it, a man of 
excellent business qualifications and habits. He died in Albany 
March 20th, 1854, at the advanced age of eighty-three years. Mrs. 
Yates died in New York September 28th, 1841, aged sixty-nine 
years. 

Henry Christopher, his oldest son, born June 13th, 1799, graduated 
at Union College in 1818, and died May 12th, 1847, unmarried. 

Edward, another son, born October 21st, 1801, graduated at Union 
College in 1819, and died in 1833. 

Stephen, also a son, born July 12th, 1805, graduated at Union Col- 
lege in 1825, and died June 1st, 1875. 



274 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Charles, another son, born March ist, 1808, graduated at Union 
College in 1829, ^^^ '^^^^ September 26th, 1870. 

Mary, a daughter, born August 17th, 1795, and Jane Anne, another 
daughter, born February 29th, 18 16, married Edward Satterlee of 
Albany. Both daughters are now deceased. 

Andrew, another son of Colonel Christopher, born January 17th, 
1773, married, first, Mary Austin ; secondly, Hannah A. Hocker, who 
died October 2 2d, 1859, aged seventy-six years. Dr. Yates was a man 
of much study and literary attainments. He was a minister of the 
Reformed Dutch Church, esteemed as possessed of eminent piety, as 
a true friend of feeble churches and organization. Without great 
sensational eloquence, he was a sound divine, and often preached 
with great power. While teaching he was always engaged, more or 
less, in preaching the gospel. He graduated from Yale College in 
1793 and studied theology under John H. Livingston, D. D., S. T., 
Professor. He was professor of I^atin and Greek in Union College 
from 1797 to 1 801 ; pastor of the East Hartford Congregational 
church from 1801 to 1814; professor of Mental and Moral Philoso- 
phy in Union College from 1814 to 1825, ^^^ prmcipal of the 
Polytechnic at Chittenango from 1825 to 1836. He died at Day, 
Saratoga county, while on a visit to his sister. Miss Yates, October 
14th, 1844, in his seventy-third year. 

John Austin Yates, a son by his first marriage, born May 31st, 
1801, graduated at Union College in 1821. He was professor of 
oriental literature in that institution from 1823 to the time of his 
decease, August 27th, 1849, ^^^ much distinguished for genial 
qualities and ready eloquence. He was the father of John B. Yates, 
colonel of the First Michigan Engineers under General William 
Tecumseh Sherman; superintendent of railroads in Tennessee, under 
President Johnson, and died October 13th, 1899, and of Austin 
A. Yates, an attorney-at-law, ex-judge of the county of Schenectady, 
and of Arthur R. Yates, who died November 4th, 1891, a captain in 
the United States Navy. 

John B., another son of Colonel Christopher, and his youngest 
child, born February ist, 1784. In 1802, at the early age of eigh- 
teen years, he graduated at Union College with much honor, and 



GENEALOGY. 275 

immediately thereafter entered the law office of his brother, Hon. 
Henry Yates, as a law student. In 1805 he was admitted to the bar, 
and during the seven following years applied himself with great 
industry to the labors of that profession, and acquired much reputa- 
tion as an ingenious and forcible advocate. But a short time pre- 
vious to the War of 181 2, inheriting the patriotic spirit of his father, 
he was commissioned a captain by Gov. Tompkins, and raised a large 
volunteer company of horse artillery. With this company he joined 
the army of General Wade Hampton, and served under him on the 
northern frontier of this state, in the campaign of 181 3. After the 
discharge of his company from service under Hampton, Governor 
Tompkins appointed him one of his aides-de-camp, and sent him to 
the Niagara frontier with orders to call out the militia for the relief 
of General Brown and his army, who were closely besieged in Fort 
Erie by a superior force. At the expiration of his military service, 
he was elected a member of the Fourteenth United States Congress 
from the thirteenth (Schenectady and Schoharie) district, for the 
years 181 5-1 6, in which he took a prominent and active part, much 
distinguished for ability and firmness. After the close of his con- 
gressional term, he removed to Utica, where he resumed the duties 
of his legal profession, but soon changed his home to Chittenango. 
Governor Tompkins, on retiring from office in 181 7, to assume 
the duties of Vice-President of the United States, on account of his 
confidence in Mr. Yates' integrity and ability, appointed him sole 
manager of the "Literature Lotteries " of the State of. New York. 
In consequence of the acceptance of his trust, he removed to the 
city of New York, and did not resume his residence in Chittenango 
until 1S25 '1 b^^t during his residence in New York he frequently 
visited Chittenango to examine and direct the conduct of those in 
charge of his large estate there, which consisted of about 2,000 acres 
of land, with flour mills, saw mills, lime and plaster mills, woolen 
factory, stores, dry dock and yards for building and repairing boats, 
polytechnic school and various residences and buildings. At times 
as many as one hundred and fifty men were in his employ. 

The result of his management of the lotteries was that he brought 



276 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

them to a successful termination before the expiration of the time 
limited by the Legislature. 

He also became deeply interested in the commercial importance of 
the Welland Canal, when its stockholders were nearly sinking for 
want of funds, and by an investment of $137,000, and his great per- 
sonal influence and exertions in his native state and in England, 
carried it into successful operation. In this he was largely aided by 
the Duke of Wellington. 

Mr. Yates was a man of large and liberal views, and of great 
public spirit, an early and devoted friend of the Erie canal, and of 
all schemes devoted to civilization and public progress. He was for 
many years judge, and first judge of the county of Madison, which 
last office, and that of member of assembly, he held at the time of 
his decease. 

Elizabeth, a daughter of Colonel Christopher, born May 7th, 1763, 
married Jellis A. Fonda. 

Eva, another daughter, born January 13th, 1764, married William 
Johnson Butler of Niagara. 

Helena, also a daughter, born November i6th, 1766, married 
Colonel McDonald, an officer of the British army stationed in 
Canada. 

Anna, also a daughter, born March 12th, 1773, died April 17th, 
1850, aged seventy-six years and unmarried. 

Jellis, another son of Joseph Yates and Eva Fonda, and brother of 
Colonel Stoeffel, born April 22d, 1744, married, March i6th, 1768, 
Ariantje, daughter of x'\ndries Bradt. He died in Glenville, Novem- 
ber 13th, 18 1 2, in his sixty-ninth year. He was a gallant young 
lieutenant in the Revolution, rising from a private in his brother's 
regiment and serving throughout the war; 

Joseph, his oldest son, born August 7th, 1768, married, December 
14th, 1788, Annatie, daughter of Isaac Roosa. He died in Glenville, 
September 13th, 1838, in his seventy-first year. 

Isaac J. Yates, his oldest son, born in Glenville, February 2 2d, 
1797 ; long a resident of the city of Schenectady ; the holder of sev- 
eral offices of important trust in this community, and a brigadier 
general of militia, died on his farm in Greenfield, Saratoga county, 



GENEALOGY. 



277 



September 13th, 1848, aged fifty-one years. This was the father of 
Mrs. James Fuller and of the late mayor, Peter B. Yates. 

Giles, another son of Joseph, born May 6th, 1801, died April nth, 
1853, in his fifty-second year. 

John J., also a son, born March 5th, 1803, for many years an enter- 
prising citizen of this community, and for several years postmaster 
of Schenectady, died December 3d, 1851, aged forty-eight years. 
This was the father of Mrs. Austin A. Yates and Mrs. Alexander J. 
Thompson. Andrew J., another son of Joseph, born November 25th, 
1806, belonged to the Class of 1834, at Union College, and died 
October, 1873, ^^ his country seat near Fulton ville, Montgomery 
county, aged sixty-five years. He left no issue. 

Andrew, another son of Jellis, born July 14th, 1782, died in Glen- 
ville, August 25th, 1846, in his sixty-fifth year. Harriet, his wife, 
died September 4th, 1850, in her seventieth year. 

Eldert Tymensen, son of Cornelius Tymensen of Albany, born 
December 13th, 1691, married, November 7th, 1709, Hester, daugh- 
ter of Bastian Visscher. He soon after settled in Niskayuna. 

Bastian, son of Eldert, born February ist, 17 18, married, July 7th, 
1743, Mayke Ouderkirk. 

Eldert, his son, born September 2d, 1750, married, December loth , 
1774, Catalyntje, daughter of Jan Baptist Van Eps. 

Bastian, his son, died in New York, March 24th, 1825, i^ his 
fiftieth year. 

Peter Tymensen, son of the second Cornelius, of Albany, born 
June 26th, 1748, married, June 2rst, 1771, Gertruy, daughter of Mar- 
timus Cregier. Cornelius, their son, was born March 12th, 1772. 

Eldert, another son of the second Cornelius of Albany, born October 
14th, 1753, married Elizabeth, daughter of Pieter Van Vranken. 

Cornelius, his oldest son, born April 7th, 1782, married Elizabeth 
Clute. He died January 4th, 1842 ; his wife died August 3d, 1844. 
Peterj another son of Eldert, born November i6th, 1789, married 
Maria, a daughter of Cornelius Van Vranken of Niskayuna. He 
died September 16th, 1 861, leaving four sons and one daughter. Jan, 
the daughter, married Thomas Shannon of Schenectady. 

19 



278 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The Liglithalls were great fighters in the Revolution. Their 
names spelled all kinds of ways ( it seems to have been very tough 
orthography for the Dutchmen to handle ), are in many a roll in the 
State archives. The following is the lineage : 

Abraham Lighthall came to Schenectady in 1719. Soon after- 
wards he married Anna, daughter of Claas Van der Bogart. William, 
his oldest son, born February 3d, 1722, married, November 20th, 
1748, Elizabeth, daughter of Johannes Marselis. 

Abraham, son of William, married Annatje, daughter of Claas 
Frans Van der Bogart ; he left surviving several children. 

Claas, another son of Abraham, born March 7th, 1724, married, 
January 14th, 1749, Margaret Idich. 

Jacobus, his oldest son, born May 14th, 1758, married Charity 
Page. He was sexton of the Dutch church from 1799 to the time of 
his death, April 22d, 1829, aged seventy-one years. He left surviv- 
ing him two sons, Nicholas and William, and two daughters, Eliza- 
beth and Maria. 

William, another son of Claas, married Sarah, daughter of iVhas- 
ueras Marselis. He died October 5th, 1822. He held a commission 
of lieutenant in the War of the Revolution, and was highly distin- 
guished for his bravery in the battle of Bennington, under General 
Stark. Besides Ahasueras, he had an older son, Nicholas, who died 
unmarried before his father's decease. 

Ahasueras, his son, born March 12th, 1799, married, September 
loth, 1820, Margaret Peek. 

Lancaster, also a son of Claas, born May loth, 1761, married 
Hester Kittle, and had three sons, Nicholas, Douwe and Abraham ; 
also a daughter, Annake. 

Jacobus, also a son of Abraham, born January 3d, 1726, married, 
first, Margaret, daughter of Pierre Benoit ; secondly, Sara, daughter 
of Johannes Van Vorst, November 12th, 1752. He died July 19th, 
1 791. She died March 14th, 1807. 

John, a son of Jacobus, born F'ebruary 18th, 1759, married Annatje, 
daughter of Cornelius Van Slyck, April 23d, 1793. ^^ ^^^^ "^ 
Glenville, August 4th, 1835, aged seventy-eight years. 



GENEALOGY 279 

Nicholas, another son of Jacobus, born May 19th, 1767, married 
Elizabeth Wageman, For many years he was ferryman on the 
Glenville side of the Mohawk river, near the present Mohawk bridge, 
representing the interest of John Sanders, deceased. While a ferry- 
man on the opposite shore, he represented the interest of Hon. 
Joseph C. Yates and Jan Baptist Van Eps, Esq. After the bridge 
was completed in 1809, he kept an inn on Water street, near the 
bank of the main Binnekill. He died January 27th, 1838, in his 
eighty-eighth year. His wife died October 20th, 1836, in her eighty- 
seventh year. They left two sons, Nicholas and William ; also two 
daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth. 

John, also a son of James, born February 12th, 1755, married, 
April 23d, 1793, Annatje, daughter of Cornelius Van Slyck. He died 
in Glenville, August 4th, 1835, aged seventy-eight years. 
The Steers family is as follows : 

St. John Steers, came as a soldier to Schenectady in 1720. He 
soon after married Catharine McGregor. In 1756 he had the grant 
of a lot of land in Green street, near the fort. 

John, a son of St. John Steers, born October 15th, 1732, married, 
November 3d, 1759, Clara, daughter of Peter Van Slyck. He 
inherited the Green street lot from his father, which descended 
to his son Cornelius, and was possessed by him until his death in 
1863, at the age of eighty-six years. John Steers died February 
i2th, 1811. Gertruy, a daughter of John, born August i6th, 1767, 
married John Lambert, the noted schoolmaster. 

Samuel, also a son of St. John, died at an advanced age, unmar- 
ried. 

The Condes distinctly trace their lineage from the great Conde of 
France and they have occupied eminent places among their fellow 
citizens in this county. 

Adam Conde was high constable of Albany in 1724; from thence 

he removed to Schenectady, and November 30th, 1736, married 

Catharine, daughter of Jesse DeGraff. He was killed at the Beuken- 

dahl massacre, July i8th, 1848, and left surviving him two sons. 

Jesse, the oldest son, born March 13th, 1743, on the 8th of July, 



28o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

1762, married Parthenia, daughter of Jonathan Ogden, and removed 
to what is now the town of Charlton, Saratoga county. He left sur- 
viving him the following children : 

Alida, born January i6th, 1763, married James Boyd, once a mem- 
ber of assembly for Schenectady county, and a prominent politician 
and citizen of Glenville. 

Jonathan, a son, born December 14th, 1766. This was the father 
of Wilnert, subsequently Mrs. Carpenter, a widow, well knowu to 
our citizens. The father died in Charlton, March 3d, 1843. 

Albert, also a son, born June 9th, 1771, married Esther, daughter 
of Daniel Toll. 

Isaac, another son, born August 21st, 1785. 

Jesse, also a son, born September 4th, 1791, all of whom are 
deceased. 

Adam, the other son of Adam, Sr., was born September 25th, 
1748, and married, July ist, 1770, Catalyntje, daughter of Peter 
Truax, and a granddaughter of Dominie Cornelius Van Santvoord. 
In 1770 he lived on the west corner of Church and Front streets, on 
the property, or a portion of it, now belonging to the estate of Jere- 
miah Fuller, deceased. He served during the Revolutionary War, 
under the gallant Captain Jellis Fonda. He died in Glenville, Sep- 
tember 2 2d, 1824, aged seventy-six years. His widow died April 
15th, 1843, i^ h^^ ninety-third year. 

Peter, son of Adam, Jr., born July 25th, 1773, married, December 
24th, 1796, Clara, daughter of Philip Van Patten. He died in 
Charlton, May 17th, 1843, leaving several children surviving him. 

Catharina, a daughter of Adam, Jr., born October 3d, 1775, mar- 
ried Charles Taylor. 

Eva, another daughter, born March 26th, 1780, married Simon 
J. Van Patten. 

Cornelius Santvoord Conde, another son of Adam, Jr., born Sep- 
tember 29th, 1782, married, July 13th, 1805, Sarah, daughter of 
Abraham Truax. He resided in Glenville ; was for several years 
one of the judges of the Court of Common Pleas of the county of 
Schenectady, and subsequently, for a long term. Justice of Sessions. 
He was much esteemed by all who knew him, as a , man of strict 



GENEALOGY. 281 

integrity, sound judgment and elevated Christian character. He 
died May 13th, 1869, in his eighty-seventh year. This worthy 
couple had lived together in married life nearly sixty-four years, and 
what seems unprecedented, had in that time thirteen children, all 
sons, never being blessed with a daughter, all of whom arrived at 
mature age except one son, Andrew S., who died in 1837, aged about 
fifteen years. This case seems so remarkable that it is proper to 
insert the names and date of birth of each, as the family have so 
largely contributed to the population and prosperity of the United 
States, and some of its members are now to be found settled in 
various parts of the Union. 

John T., born January 17th, 1807. 

Adam C, born March 7th, 1809. 

Abraham T., born December 20th, 18 10. 

Peter C, born December 2d, 1812. 

Cornelius B., born December 27 th, 18 14. 

Isaac H., born November 17th, 1818. 

Piatt S., born August 20th, 1820. 

Andrew S., born August i8th, 1822, died July 5th, 1837. 

Joseph S., born July 31st, 1824. 

George M., born November 6th, 1826. 

Benjamin L., born November 7th, 1828. 

Alonzo B., born November 6th, 1832. 

John Dunbar was the ancestor of a distinguished line. He was 
born in Albany, August 31st, 1670. He married, first, Sata Winne ; 
and secondly, Maria, daughter of Johannes Van Hosen, April ist, 
1724 ; both wives were of Albany. He was in Albany a vintner or 
hotel keeper, and an important friend of the early Episcopal church 
of that place. In 17 14 he was associated with Rev. Thomas Bar- 
clay and Colonel Peter Matthews, in building the Episcopal church 
there. In 1730 he removed to Schenectady where he resided on his 
property, on the east corner of Church and Front streets. Mr. 
Dunbar died in Schenectady, May 7th, 1736, aged sixty-six years. 
He left surviving him three sons, Robert, John and Alexander , also 
three daughters, Mary, Catharine and Willempie. All the sons, and 
his daughter Catharine, settled at Albany, where they have respec- 



282 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

tively many descendants. His daughter Mary married, September 
5th, 1737, Joseph R. Yates, and was the mother of Robert Yates, 
once Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York; 
of John Yates, Nicholas and Abraham Yates, and of several daugh- 
ters, who married prominent citizens of Schenectady. She inherited 
from her father his house and lot, corner of Church and Front 
streets. 

Willempie, his youngest daughter, married, November 29th, 1736, 
Abraham Groot. She inherited from her father a large parcel of 
ground on the west corner of Union and Canal streets. 

The Hemstraats, (Hemstreets as it is now spelled), appear on Revo- 
lutionary rolls, and have few descendants of the name living here. 

Johannes Hemstraat, son of Dirk Takelse of Albany, married, 
first, Bata, daughter of Johannes Quackenbos, February 8th, 1730, 
and came to Schenectady about that time. Secondly, he married, 
March 3d, 1750, Gertruy Bosie, widow of John Marinus. 

Johannes, his son, born November 19th, 1732, married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Tennis Van der Volgen, September 3d, 1754. 

Ariantje, a daughter of John, Jr., born October 17th, 1756, mar- 
ried Nicholas Avery. 

Sarah, also a daughter, born November, 17 18, married Isaac 
I.e Roy. 

Clara, a daughter of Johannes, Sr., born July 6th, 1735, married 
Nicholas Clute. 

Annatje, also a daughter, born December 21st, 1737, married Dirk 
Clute. 

Machtelt, another daughter, born October nth, 1747, married 
Johannes Consaulus. 

The Barheyts, now Barhydt, did not come to Schenectady until 
the eighteenth century. 

John Barheyt, son of John, of Albany, born May i6th, 1703, 
settled in Schenectady, and married, August ist, 1734, Cornelia, 
daughter of Arent Footman. 

Cornelius, son of John, Jr., born December 21st, 1737, married 
Rachel, daughter of Joseph Yates. 



GENEALOGY. 283 

John, a son of Cornelius, born August 30th, 1767, married, Janu- 
ary 24th, 1790, Maria, daughter of Cornelius Van Slyck. He died 
February 20th, 1830, in his sixty-third year. 

Cornelius, a son of John, born March i6th, 1695, died July loth, 
1850. 

Jacobus, a son of John, Jr., born February 9th, 1753, i^iarried 
Maria Bovie. 

Lewis, another son, born December 21st, 1755, married Elsie Bar- 
heyt. 

Catharina, a daughter, born June 14th, 1740, married Charles 
Denniston. 

Eva, also a daughter, born November 25th, 1744, married John 
Coman. 

Jacomyntje, another daughter, married Wouter Vrooman. 

Anna, also a daughter, born June loth, 1750, married William 
Hall. 

Hieronimus (Jerome), also a son of John, of iVlbany, born March 
20th, 1709, married, April 9th, 1737, Maria, daughter of Jesse 
DeGraff. 

Johannes, his son, born January /th, 1739, married Helena, 
daughter of Jacobus Peek. 

Jacobus, a son of John, born October 2d, 1763, married Christina 
Abel. 

Jerome, also a son of John, born November 2d, 1765, married, 
January 4th, 1789, Cornelius Beeker. 

John Sanders Barheyt, another son, born March loth, 1771, mar- 
ried, June 30th, 1794, Catharina, daughter of Johannes Stevens. He 
died July 27th, 1852, in his eighty-third year. 

Hendrick, also a son, born January nth, 1778, married Catalyntje, 
daughter of Gerrit Van Slyck. 

Alida, a daughter of John, born August 9th, 1761, died unmarried. 

Phillip Ryley, of the city of New York, came here about 1742, 
and had the following lineage : 

James Van Slyck Ryley, son of Philip, born October 3d, 1761, 
married, August 19th, 1792, Jannetje, daughter of Isaac Swits. He 
died January 8th, 1848, aged eighty-six years, leaving several daugh- 



284 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

ters, one of whom married the distinguished divine, Rev. John Lud- 
low, D. D., for many years provost of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Mr. Ryley was for many years associate judge of the Court of 
Common Pleas of Schenectady County ; for a long time postmaster 
of this city, and was, on several occasions, employed as commissioner 
and interpreter by the United States Government to negotiate treaties 
with the northwestern tribes of Indians, for which position he was 
peculiarly fitted, having been, during his early life, a well-known 
trader among them. He also served several years as sheriff of 
Schenectady County. 

Alida, daughter of Philip, born July 15th, 1743, married Gerrit 
R. Van Vranken. 

Gertrude, another daughter, born October 3d, 1744, married 
William Rogers, Jr. 

The Corls were soldiers. Hendrick Corl came to Schenectady in 
1745, where he married Maria Olin. 

John, his son, born April 3d, 1757, married Susanna, daughter of 
Jan Baptist Van Vorst. He was a gallant private in Captain Clute's 
company in the Revolutionary War, and died April 24th, 1842, in 
his eighty-fifth year, leaving several children surviving. 

William, another son of Hendrick, born November i6th, 1760, 
married Maria Springer, July 8th, 1787. He was also a patriotic 
private in Captain Vrooman's company, in Colonel Wemple's Regi- 
ment in the Revolutionary War. He died March 19th, 1848, aged 
eighty-four years. His wife died May 5th, 1852, aged ninety-one 
years. They left several sons and daughters and many descendants 
surviving them. 

The Shannons are of Revolutionary stock. Robert Shannon, a 
Scotchman, came to Schenectady about 1750, and, on the 28th day 
of May, in that year, married Elizabeth Bowel (Bowles). 

George, a son of Robert, born March 17th, 1751, married Sarah 
Smith. He was a Revolutionary soldier, and died January 8th, 1829, 
aged eighty years, leaving several children surviving him, among 
them a son, John, born April 9th, 1791, a citizen well and favorably 
known in Schenectady county. 



GENEALOGY. 285 

Thomas, also a son of Robert, born December 20th, 1752, married 
Margaret, daughter of Abraham Schermerhorn, and left several 
children surviving him, among them one son named Aaron, born 
April 26th, 1795, the father of the late Thomas Shannon. 

John, another son of Robert, married, July 4th, 1781, Margaret, 
also a daughter of Abraham Schermerhorn. He served as a patri- 
otic soldier in the War of the Revolution, and died April, 1821, 
leaving children. 

William, also a son of Robert, married Jenny Smith. 

Robert, another son of Robert, married, first, Nancy McGregor ; 
secondly, in 1805, Eva Waller. 

Michael, also a son of Robert, married Susanna, daughter of 
Joseph Bracham. 

Alexander, also a son of Robert, married, April 20th, 1788, Eliza- 
beth, another daughter of Joseph Bracham. 

Margaret, a daughter of Robert, born May 14th, 1758, married 
Simon B. Veeder. 

All of the above named children left descendants, so it is evident 
that the healthy blood of the honest, old Scot circulates extensively 
in our community. 

John Brown, whose tablet is in St. George's church, of which he 
was a father, married, in May, 1751, Margaret, daughter of Caleb 
Beck, and immediately thereafter settled at Schenectady. Mr. Brown 
was born in 1727, and died June 30th, 18:4, in his eighty-seventh 
year, very much respected and regretted. 

Abraham, his son, born November nth, 1762, married, first, Jane, 
daughter of Daniel Kittle ; secondly, Margaret Van Vorst. 

John, son of Abraham by his first marriage, born August 9th, 1783, 
married a daughter of Joseph Van de Bogart, by whom he had a son, 
John, who became an Episcopal minister, and a gentleman of con- 
siderable poetic note and of acknowledged literary attainments. He 
was a graduate of Union College, and was settled at Astoria, Long 
Island, N. Y., where he held a high standing, and died on the Island 
of Malta, whither he had gone for the benefit of his health, leaving 
a son named John W. Brown, and three daughters. John Brown, 



286 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

the father, also left several daughters. He was a manufacturer and 
dealer in bottles, shoes and leather, and much esteemed as a good 
and enterprising citizen. 

Daniel Campbell, the amiable Tory, came to Schenectady some 
time in the year 1754. He was a native of Ireland, and was pos- 
sessed of small means. On his arrival, he commenced as an Indian 
trader, with a pack upon his back, and by his native shrewdness, 
great industry and remarkable economy, in a few years extended his 
operations and at the commencement of the Revolutionary War was 
esteemed a citizen of considerable fortune. He subsec^uently became 
an extensive merchant and Indian trader, and by purchasing soldiers' 
rights, at the conclusion of peace, acquiring great wealth at Schenec- 
tady. Some years after his arrival he married Angelica, daughter of 
Arent Samuelse Bratt, by whom he had one son, named David, born 
November 15th, 1768. That son died June 29th, i8oi,in his thirty- 
third year, leaving all his property to his father. The father himself 
died August i6th, 1802, aged seventy-one years, ten months and 
twenty-eight days. Daniel Campbell was the intimate friend and 
acquaintance of Sir William Johnson, both hailing from the Emer- 
ald Isle of the ocean ; and when at Schenectady, where he often 
came, being much interested in" the progress of the infant Episcopal 
church there, Mr. Campbell's house w^as always the baronet's home. 
That house was the premises now occupied by Mr. Stewart Myers, and 
erected in 1762 for Mr. Campbell by Samuel Fuller, one of the most 
noted architects of the province at that day. 

In 1 77 1 Mr. Campbell was one of the judges of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for Albany county. He made his will July i6th, 1801, 
leaving about one-third portion of his large estate to some relatives 
in Ireland, and the remainder, unrestricted, to his wife, Angelica. 

Mrs. Campbell made her will May 27th, 181 1, leaving considerable 
sums to her various relatives, but made her great-nephew, Daniel 
Campbell Schermerhorn, her residuary de\isee and legatee, on con- 
dition of changing his name Schermerhorn to Campbell, which, after 
her decease, was accomplished by legislative enactment. 

The Oothouts were a fine revolutionary and soldierly race, but 
have all died out. 



GENEALOGY. 287 

The notorious and infamous Tory, Major John Munroe, a young 
Scotchman, settled here. His brutality to prisoners was in so direct 
a violation of the laws of civilized warfare, that he was dismissed 
from the English service. He left no descendants, at least, none 
that acknowledged the paternity. Fearing that investigation may 
discover his blood still running in a townsman's veins, his name and 
record will be mercifully dismissed from these papers. 

Samuel Fuller, one of the most distinguished architects that this 
county has produced, according to Judge John Sanders, was a lineal 
descendant of Dr. Samuel Fuller of the Mayflower. 

He first came to Schenectady during the French War, on the 28th 
day of March, 1758, and was then wholly employed in the King's 
service at Schenectady, Albany, Stillwater, the great carrying place. 
Fort Edward, Lake George and Niskayuna. He was engaged in the 
construction of boats, wagons, log houses and shelters for the use of 
the army commanded by General Abercrombie (some evidence of the 
versatility of his powers), until July 31st, 1758, after which period 
he returned to Boston, and from that place went to Halifax, where he 
arrived February 7th, 1759, and continued in the royal service in the 
navy yard there, until after the taking of Quebec by General Wolff 
in September, 1759, from whence he returned to Boston and thence 
to Schenectady, where he arrived in July, 1761, and on the 13th of 
the same month commenced the building of a mansion in this town, 
and the year following erected " The Hermitage," in Niskayuna, 
for our great ex-merchant, John Duncan, upon his extensive estate 
there. This latter building was, long after its erection, burned down, 
and is now replaced, at a point not far distant, upon a portion of the 
same domain, by a fine mansion, the residence of ex-Senator Charles 
Stanford. 

Mr. Fuller built for Sir William Johnson the Guy Park mansion, 
subsequently the residence of Sir Guy Johnson, and also the Claas 
mansion, afterwards the abode of Colonel Daniel Claas, both gentle- 
men son-in-law of Sir William. He also built the now venerable 
court-house at Johnstown, still standing in all its early proportions, 
admirably preserved with great taste, and should always be saved for 
its old associations, and as a standing witness of the severe trials of 



288 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

our Revolutionary struggle. The sight of no costly court structure 
of the present day affords to the scholar and the historian so much 
of interest and association as this sound and unique structure. Here 
Sir William Johnson and Colonel Frederick Vischer respectively 
held their courts. Here Lewis, Kent, Spencer, Van Ness, Piatt, 
Yates and Walworth, have often adjudicated causes with profound 
lore and noble impartiality. And here, too, the voices of Hamilton, 
Burr, Emmett, Van Vechten, Henry, Talcott, Cady, Reynolds, and 
many other distinguished lawyers, now resting from their labors, 
have echoed from its historic walls. 

The old Johnstown courthouse should be treasured and maintained 
as an honorable relic of New York's most honorable days. 

Mr. Fuller also built the dwelling of General Nicholas Herkimer, 
in the town which is now Danube, Herkimer ' county, and other 
prominent mansions in the Mohawk Valley. 

He did much to alter, yet improve the old Holland style of build- 
ing in Schenectady. He built the Episcopal church in 1762, (now 
the oldest Episcopal church structure standing in the state of New 
York). He built the John Glen mansion on Washington avenue, 
now owned by Mr. Swartfigure, the Ten Eyck mansion, until his 
decease, the residence of Governor Joseph C. Yates, and the Daniel 
Campbell mansion, corner of State and Church streets, now owned 
and occupied by Mrs. John C. Myers. 

The reflecting citizen cannot but feel that Schenectady owes much 
to the early architectural skill of Samuel Fuller. 

Jeremiah Fuller, the son, and only surviving child of Samuel 
Fuller, born October 26th, 1766, married Mary, daughter of George 
Kendall, January 23d, 1790. They were the parents of fourteen 
children, ten sons and four daughters, all of whom reached majority 
except one son, Samuel, and one daughter, Anna, who died in 
infancy. Mr. Fuller was a man of marked decision of character, of 
great integrity and business energy ; no one more highly estimated 
the advantages of a liberal education than he, or more generously 
prized the efforts of learned men. Born at a time when educational 
advantages were few, he, in a long life, saw more each day its value 
and social importance, and a remarkable circumstance, that of nine 



GENEALOGY. 289 

sons who survived him, each was a graduate of Union College, and 
in the various walks and professions of life, have worthily sustained 
its literary and practicable reputation ; nor was the education of his 
daughters by any means neglected. As a whole, Mr. Fuller, like his 
father, was one of the most remarkable citizens. He died June i8th, 
1839, in the seventy-third year of his age. His estimable wife, Mary, 
died November 9th, i860, at the ripe age of eighty-five years, six 
months and nineteen days, beloved by all who knew her. 

General William Kendall Fuller, the oldest surviving son of Jere- 
miah, was born November 24th, 1792. He was educated in the 
schools of Schenectady, graduated at Union College in 1810, studied 
law in the office of Henry and John B. Yates, then the most promi- 
nent practitioners of Schenectady county, and was admitted to prac- 
tice in the Supreme Court of the State of New York in 1814. Soon 
after his admission he entered into partnership with Hon. John B. 
Yates. In the summer of 181 4 they moved to Utica, Oneida county, 
at that time a village of about 1,300 inhabitants; opened an office, 
practiced law there until the spring of 1816, when they removed to 
Chittenango, Madison county, then merely a hamlet of 100 inhabi- 
tants, where, and m the vicinity, the senior partner, Mr. Yates, 
owned large landed interests. 

The public seems to have entertained the most perfect confidence 
in the integrity and abilities of Mr. Fuller. Soon after his settle- 
ment at Chittenango, unsolicited on his part, office clustered upon 
him. He seemed an idol at Chittenango, and in Mad-ison county, 
then sparsely and newly settled, being only organized as a county in 
1806. 

All this flattering tribute from his constituents culminated in the 
year 1823, i^^ his appointment by Governor Yates to the position of 
adjutant-general of the State of New York, serving through his 
whole administration, and during several months of the succeeding 
term of Governor Clinton, with so much acceptance, that on retiring 
from the office Governor Clinton issued a "general order" com- 
plimentary to Mr. Fuller's services as adjutant-general. 

In 1823, ^t the time of his appointment as adjutant-general. Judge 
Fuller relinquished the practice of the law. After the expiration of 



290 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

his office as adjutant-general, he returned to Chittenango, and 
became greatly interested in the management of valuable real estate 
there, and in that vicinity ; was a commissioner under legislative 
acts, to drain the Canaseraga marsh, and was one of the directors and 
the secretary and treasurer of the " Side-Cut " from Chittenango to 
the Erie canal, which was completed under his superintendence, 
simultaneously with the middle section of the Erie canal, at a much 
less cost than the capital subscribed. This lateral canal, with its 
four locks, was abandoned in consequence of the adoption of a new 
route for the Erie canal, at the time of its enlargement, by which 
the latter was brought to the northern limits of the village. 

Madison county elected him member of assembly for two succes- 
sive terms (1829-30), and he was elected twice in succession a mem- 
ber of Congress from the twenty-third district, then composed of the 
counties of Madison and Onondaga, his last term ending March 3d, 
1837. He died at Schenectady. 

Samuel, also a son of Jeremiah, born April i6th, 1795, was a 
graduate of Union College, completed his medical studies in the city 
of New York, and established himself as a physician and surgeon in 
Chittenango, Madison county, in 181 8, where he continued to prac- 
tice with much success and reputation until 1866, when, with his 
family, he removed to the city of New York, where he died the 
following year, in the seventy-third year of his age. 

George Kendall, another son, born January 29th, 1799, was liber- 
ally educated, possessed of sound judgment, clear preceptions, great 
moral courage and generous temper. He came to reside in Chitte- 
nango about the year 1820, and soon became the general agent and 
superintendent of the extensive farming, mercantile and manufac- 
turing interests of Hon. John B. Yates at that place, and so con- 
tinued until the decease of that gentleman in 1836; and so highly 
were his services and fidelity appreciated, that Mr. Yates left him by 
his_will a legacy of $5,000, and appointed him one of its executors. 
He was engaged in the trust thus confided to him, until the final 
settlement of the estate, which, from unavoidable circumstances, did 
not occur until 1852. Mr. Fuller died at Chittenango, May 9th, 



GENEALOGY. 291 

1858, in his sixtieth year, unmarried, and the only son of Jeremiah, 
who was not a professional man. 

Richard, also a son, born October 28th, 1804, was a graduate of 
Union College. He was a practicing physician at Schenectady, and 
at one time demonstrator of anatomy in the medical department of 
Clinton College, at Fairfield, Herkimer county. A deep thinker and 
student, his life of promise and usefulness was cut off by insidious 
disease. May 15th, 1837, at the early age of thirty-three years, much 
regretted by those who knew his sterling qualities. 

Edward, another son of Jeremiah, born February 15th, 1807, was 
a liberally educated gentleman, and completing his medical studies 
in New York, settling at Chittenango, he became a partner of his 
brother, Samuel, in 1824, acquiring an excellent reputation for skill 
and close attention to business. He retired from the practice in 
1834, and amid the comforts of an ample fortune, died January 22d, 
1877, aged about seventy years, universally respected. 

Charles, also a son, born April ist, 1809, is a lawyer, residing and 
practicing in the city of Schenectady. Henry, another son, born 
February 2d, 1811, was an attorney-at-lavv, practicing at Schenectady 
for several years, and from thence removed to the city of New York, 
continuing his profession there until his decease, January 6th, 1875. 
He was interred at Schenectady. 

James, another son, born July 24th, 18 14, was a gentleman of 
liberal education, sound law knowledge, courteous manners, and 
an extensive legal practice in the city of Schenectady, justly 
esteemed by the community for strict integrity, and the conscientious 
discharge of professional duties. 

Robert, the youngest son of Jeremiah, born February 14th, 1822, 
also a graduate of Union College, was a practicing physician of 
Schenectady, of acknowledged skill and ability. 

Joseph Carley, a veteran of the Continental army, came after the 
Revolution, and built on Front street. 

His son was Gerardus I. Carley, the partner at one time of 
DeGraff, Walton & Co., and the father of Mr. Joseph G. Carley of 
this city. 



292 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Andrew Mitchell, a Scotchman, was a merchant here in 1765. He 
was an ardent Whig and patriot and a member of the committee of 
public safety. He was the grandfather of the late Hon. Thomas B. 
Mitchell, father of Mrs. John DeLancy Walkins. 

Of the Duanes, Waltons, Paiges, and others destined to add renown 
to the name of Schenectady, subsequent history will enforce their 
recognition. It is with Revolutionary and Colonial ancestry of the 
valley, strictly of which the record is here given for the benefit of 
their descendants. There may be, doubtless there are, many whose 
names are omitted from the roll of the honored of the old days. If 
so, it is because the historian must speak only from record and not 
from tradition. In no other way can there be certainty of authentic 
correctness. 



CHAPTER XXV. 



SCHENECTADY IN THE CIVIL WAR. 

The following schedules are intended to, and it is believed they 
do, embrace all the soldiers from Schenectady who served in the 
Civil War. Many were enlisted in the last months of the struggle 
from Canada, and from everywhere, to fill up quotas. Such men, so 
far as possible, have been carefully eliminated. It is intended in this 
history to give the names only of men who served and fought and 
suffered and died under our flag, who actually went from Schenec- 
tady. 

On the monument in honor of the dead at Schuyler\dlle, the tab- 
let that should mark the achievements and heroism of Arnold, is left 
blank because of his heroic services before he became a dishonored 
deserter. So this history mercifully leaves out, entirely, the names 
of deserters. Wherever a man is charged with desertion, we have 
simply stricken out his name. It may be that the charge against 
him was unfounded, and so many instances have occurred of restora- 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 293 

tion to the roll of innocent men, nnjustly charged with the most 
terrible crime that a soldier can commit, that we have decided to give 
all the benefit of the doubt and simply obliterate his name. Besides, 
it is libelous to charge a soldier with treason to his flag unless the 
proof can be forthcoming, and this risk the editor of this volume 
does not care to incur. 

The rolls were compiled from the records of the adjutant-general's 
office after close searching and careful investigation. 

The record is not always infallible, but it is at least the most 
reliable evidence that can be obtained. Orderly sergeants were not 
always correct in their reports, company clerks did not always under- 
stand the force and effect of what they wrote, and absolute correct- 
ness cannot be guaranteed in any case. All that can be claimed here 
is that the best, most authentic, and reliable record of the war that 
closed nearly forty years ago, has been obtained and printed here 
after diligent and industrious research. 

Actual sequence in either numbers or date of muster has been im- 
possible. The records have been gathered from everywhere and at 
different times. There is nothing in these rolls that must be taken 
to establish precedence of any kind. 



THIRTIETH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY. 

This regiment. Col. Edward Frisbie, was accepted by the state 
May 2 2d, 1861 ; organized at Troy, and there mustered in the ser- 
vice of the United States for two years June ist, 1861 ; December 
7th, 1862, a new company joined the regiment, becoming Company 
F, in place of the one consolidated with the other companies. The 
three years' men. of the regiment were transferred to the 76th N. Y. 
Vols. May 24th, 1863. 

The companies were recruited principally : A at Lansingburgh ; B 
and I at Troy ; C at Schenectady ; D, F and G at Saratoga Springs ; 
E at Poughkeepsie ; H at Hoosick Falls and Eagle Bridge, and reor- 
ganized at Troy, and K at Kinderhook. 



294 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The regiment left the state June 28th, 1861 ; sensed at and near 
Washington, D. C, from June 29th, 1861, in Keyes' Brigade, Divi- 
sion Potomac, from August 4th, 1861 ; in First, same brigade, 
McDowell's Division, A. P., from October, 1861 ; in Third, Augur's 
Brigade, same division, from January, 1862 ; in First Brigade, third. 
King's Division, First Corps, A. P., from March 13th, 1862 ; in First 
Brigade, King's Division, Department Rappahannock, from May, 
1862 ; in First Brigade, First Division, Third Corps, A. Va., from 
June 26th, 1862 ; in same brigade and division. First Corps, A. P., 
from September 12th, 1862, and was honorably discharged and mus- 
tered out under Col. Wm. M. Searing, June i8th, 1863, at Albany. 

June 23d, 1863, Col. Morgan H. Chrysler received authority to 
reorganize this regiment for mounted and three year's service as the 
Empire Light Cavalry ; later the designation was changed to Second 
Veteran Cavalry, and under that name the re-organization was per- 
fected. 

During its service, the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 
4 officers, 62 enlistd men ; of wounds received in action, 2 officers, 13 
enlisted men ; of disease and other causes, 2 officers, 31 enlisted men ; 
total, 8 officers, 106 enlisted men; aggregate, 114: of whom 3 en- 
listed men died in the hands of the enemy; and it took part in the 
following engagements : Doolan's Farm, Va., November i6th, 1861 ; 
Falmouth, Va., April 17-18; Orange Court House, Va., June 24, 
1862 ; Orange Court House, Va., July 26, 1862 ; Bowling Green, Va., 
August 5, 1862 ; Massaponax, Va., August 6, 1862 ; General Pope's 
campaign, Va., August 16 to September 2, 1862 ; Rappahannock 
River, August 21, 1862 ; Sulphur Springs, August 26, 1862 ; near 
Gainesville, August 28, 1862 ; Groveton, August 29, 1862 ; Bull Run, 
Augiist 30, 1862 ; Little River Turnpike, September i, 1862 ; Hall's 
Hill and Fall's Church, Va., September 4, 1862 ; South Mountain, 
Md., September 14, 1862; Antietam, Md., September 17, 1862; 
Fredericksburg, Va., December ii-i 5, 1862; Pollock's Mill Creek, 
Va., April 29 to INIay 2, 1863 ; Chancellorsville, Va., May 2-3, 1863. 

Bitkins, Hugh — Age 25 years. Enlisted April 26, 1^861, at Schenec- 
tady to serve two years ; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861 ; 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR 295 

mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., as 
Bitcom. 

Carlson, Henry P. — Age 24 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861. at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861; promoted November 22, 1862; mustered out with company 
June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Cassidy, Thomas — Age 25 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. A, June 
I, 1861; mustered out with company June i8th, 1863, at Albany, N. 
Y. ; subsequent service in Co. D. i6th N. Y. Artillery. 

Cramer, Abram C. — Age 19 years. Enlisted May i, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as corporal Co. C, June 
I, 1861; no knowledge of this man since regiment left Albany, June 
27, i86r. 

Cramer, Henry C. — Age 18 years. Enlisted May i, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years as private Co. C; not mustered; discharged 
June I, 1861. 

Eilez, Andrew — Age 45 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861 ; 
discharged for disabilit)^ May 15, 1862, at Falmouth, Va., as Eisle. 

Engle, Martin — Age 34 years. Enlisted April 28, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i. 1861; 
promoted corporal, date not stated; killed, August 30, 1862, at Bull 
Run, Va. 

Gordineer, Frederick W. — Age 20 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, 
at Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co C, 
June I, 1861; mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y., as Gardiner; subsequent service in Co. G, Second N. Y. Vet- 
eran Cavalry as Garding. 

Harran, Martin — Age 30 years. Enlisted May 20, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861 ; 
mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; also 
borne as Herrin; subsequent service in the i6th N. Y. Artillery. 

Harris, Thomas — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 26, i86r, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June r, 
1861 ; mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Herrin, Patrick — Age 18 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861 ; 



296 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

wounded August 29, 1862, at Bull Run, Va. ; mustered out with com- 
pany June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., as Haran. 

Hoffman, Adam A. — Age 26 years. Enlisted April 26, i86t, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861; wounded September 17, 1862, at South Mountain, Md. ; died 
of wounds November 7, 1862, at Middletown, Md. 

HoUon, Harris — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 
1861; discharged for disability August 23, 1861, at Arlington, Va., as 
Harrison Holland; also borne as Horace Holland; died September 7, 
1 86 1, at Washington, D. C. 

Hyson, John E. — Age 18 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 
1861; mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; 
subsequent service in Co. D, 13th Artillery. 

Kenney, David — Age 40 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 
i86r; killed August 30, 1862, at Bull Run, Va. 

Kugler, Conrad — Age 33 years. Enlisted April 27, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861 ; 
mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; also 
borne as Keugler. 

Maher, William — Age 31 years. Enlisted June 12, 1861, at Albany 
to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, same date; pro- 
moted corporal March i, 1862; first sergeant November 22, 1862; 
mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Manly, John — Age 19 years. Enlisted September 18, 1862, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private, unassigned, 
same date borne only on enlistment paper. 

Myers, Sidney — Age 23 years. Enlisted April 26, i86t, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 
1861; mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; 
subsequent service in Co. K, First Artillery. 

Niles, Nicholas N. — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as corporal Co. C, June 
I, 1 861; reduced to ranks, date not stated; mustered out with com- 
pany June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subsequent service in Co. G, 
91st N. Y. Infantry. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 



297 



Parent, John — Age 44 years. Enlisted April 23, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861; 
discharged for disability January 8, 1862, at Camp Keyes, Upton's 
Hill, Va. ; subsequent service in Co. C, i6th N. Y. Artillery; also 
borne as Parrent. 

Peters, William H. — Age 35 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as corporal Co. C, June 
I, 1861; promoted sergeant, date not stated; died of disease June 3, 
1862, at hospital, Georgetown, D. C. 

Read, George — Age 31 years. Enlisted September 13, 1862, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private, unassigned, 
same date ; name appears only on enlistment paper. 

Roth, Charles — Age ;i^ years. Enlisted April 26, i86r, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as first sergeant Co. C, June 
I, 1861; second lieutenant April 5, 1862; first lieutenant November 
30, 1862; mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. 
Y. ; commissioned second lieutenant May 13, 1862, with rank from 
February 28, 1862, vice E. Van Voast promoted; first lieutenant 
March 4, 1863, with rank from November 30, 1862; vice S. D. Potts, 
promoted. 

Ryan, Dennis — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 23, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861; 
discharged April 22, 1863, at Belle Plains, Va. ; subsequent service in 
Third N. Y. Artillery. 

Schermerhorn, Tunis C. — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, 
at Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, 
June I, 1861; discharged for disability September, 1861. at Arlington, 
Va., as Schermerhorn; also borne as Schoonmaker. 

Schoonmaker, Abram — Age 26 years. Enlisted April 23, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861; died of disease February 22, 1862, at Upton's Hill, Va. 

Schuster, Charles — Age 23 years. Enlisted April 23, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861 ; discharged for disability March 9, 1862, at Upton's Hill, Va., 
as Shuster. 

Sieberking, Frederick — Age 26 years. Enlisted April 26. 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861 ; mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., 
as Frederick M. Sieberking; also borne as Seiberking. 



298 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Silberking, Joseph — Age 20 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861; also borne as Silberstein and Silbersteen. 

Sitterly, Abram — Age 39 years. Enlisted April 23, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 
1861; discharged for disability January 8, 1862, at Camp Keyes, 
Upton's Hill, Va. 

Smith, Thomas — Age 26 years. Enlisted April 29, i86r, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861. 

Stanford, Harrison — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861; mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., 
as Stafford. 

Starks, Daniel, Jr. — Age 35 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as musician Co. C, June 
I, 1861; discharged for disability April 4, 1862, at Upton's Hill, Va. 

Thurber, James — Age 22 years. Enlisted May i, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861. 

Vanderbogart, James — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861; mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N.. Y. 

Van Epps, Perry — Age 24 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as sergeant Co. C, June 
I, 1861. 

Van Patten, Nicholas N. — Age 24 years. Enlisted April 26. 1861, 
at Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as corporal Co. C, 
June I, 1861. 

Van Voast, Barent — Age 29 years. Enlisted April 26. 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as captain Co. C, June 
I, 1861; cashiered February 28, 1862, at Upton's Hill, Va., by sen- 
tence of G. C. M. ; commissioned captain July 4, 1861, with rank 
from April 26, 1861, original. 

Van Voast, Edward — Age 22 years. Enrolled April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady as second lieutenant to serve two years; mustered in as 
second lieutenant Co. C, June i, 1861; first lieutenant May i, 1862; 
mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subse- 
quent service in Second Veteran Cavalry; commissioned second lieu- 
tenant July 4, 1861, with rank from June i, 1861; vice W. L. Peck, 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 299 

resigned; first lieutenant May 13, 1862, with rank from February 28, 
1862; vice M. V. V. Smith, promoted. 

Waldreth, Peter — Age 18 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 
1861; mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., 
as Wolrath; also borne as Walrath and Walwrath. 

Washburn, Stephen — Age 41 years. Enlisted April 23, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861 ; discharged for disability September 21, 1861, at Arlington, 
Va. 

White, Martin B. — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June 
I, 1861; absent, sick in hospital at Fort Schuyler since April 19, 1862, 
and at muster out of company. 

Yack, John C. — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 23, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861 ; 
killed August 30, 1862, at Bull Run, Va. ; also borne as Yeck. 

Zwang, Joseph — Age 29 years. Enlisted April 20, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. C, June i, 1861 ; 
promoted corporal March i. 1862; sergeant, November 22, 1862; 
mustered out with company June 18, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; also 
borne as Swang. 

SEVENTY-SEVENTH REGIMENT (VETERAN). 
Saratoga Regiment ; Bemis Heights Regiment. 

This regiment, Col. James B. McKean, was organized at Saratoga 
Springs, and there, November 23d, 1861, mustered in the service of 
the United States for three years. October 30th, 1862, a new com- 
pany was forwarded to the regiment, becoming Company K, the 
original company having been consolidated with Company F. At 
the expiration of the term of service of the regiment its members 
entitled to be discharged were forwarded to Saratoga, and there, 
under Col. Winsor B. French, mustered out December 13th, 1864 ; 
the regiment was continued in the service, but, November 19th, 1864, 
consolidated into five companies. A, B, C, D and E. 



300 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The regiment left the state November 28th, 1861 ; served in the 
Third Brigade, Casey's Division, A. P., from December, 1861 ; in 
Third, Davidson's Brigade, W. F. Smith's Division, Fourth Corps, 
A. P., from March, 1862 ; in the Third Brigade, Second Division, 
Sixth Corps, A. P., from May, 1862 ; and the battalion left in the 
the field was honorably discharged and mustered out, under Colonel 
David J. Case, June 27th, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 8 
officers, 58 enlisted men ; of wounds received in action, 3 officers, 41 
enlisted men ; of disease and other causes, i officer, 175 enlisted 
men; total, 12 officers, 274 enlisted men ; aggregate 286, of whom 
16 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy, and it took part in 
the following engagements : Siege of Yorktown, Va,, April 5 to May 
4; near Lee's Mills, April 5; Lee's Mills, April 16; before York- 
town, April 26 ; Lee's Mills, April 28 ; Williamsburg, Va., May 5 ; 
Mechanicville, Va., May 24 ; Golding's Farm, Va., June 5 ; 
Mechanicville, Va., June 24 ; Seven Day's Battle, Va., June 25 to 
July 2 ; Garnett's Farm, June 27 ; Garnett's and Golding's Farm, 
June 28 ; Savage Station, June 29 ; White Oak Swamp Bridge, June 
30; Malvern Hill, July i ; Harrison's Landing, Va., July 3 ; Cramp- 
ton Pass, Md., September 14; Antietam, Md., September 17; F'red- 
ericksburg, Va., December 11-15, 1862 ; Marye's Heights and Salem 
Church, Va., May 3-4 ; Deep Run Crossing, Va., June 5 ; Gettys- 
burg, Pa., July 1-3 ; Fairfield, Pa., July 5 ; Antietam and Marsh Run, 
Md., July 7; Funkstown, Md., July 11-13 ; Williamsport, Md., July 
14; Chantilly, Va., October 16; Rappahannock Station, Va., No- 
vember 7 ; Mine Run campaign, Va., November 26 to December 2 ; 
Germanna Ford, December i, 1863 ; Wilderness, Va., May 5-7 ; 
Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 8-21 ; Piney Branch Church, 
May 8 ; Landron P'arm, May 10 ; The Salient, May 12 ; North Anna, 
Va., May 22-26 ; Totopotomoy, Va., May 27-30 ; Cold Harbor, Va., 
May 31, June 12; before Petersburg, Va., June 17, July 9, Decem- 
ber-April 2, 1864-5 ; assault of Petersburg, Va., June 17-19; Weldon 
Railroad, Va., June 21-25 ; Washington, D. C, July 12-13 ; Charles- 
town, W. Va., August 21; Opequon Creek, Va., September 13; 
Opequon, Va., September 19 ; Fisher's Hill, Va., September 22 ; 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 301 

Cedar Creek, Va., October 19, 1864 ; Petersburg Works, Va., March 
25 ; Appomattox campaign, Va., March 28 to April 9 : fall of Peters- 
burg, April 2 ; Sailor's Creek, April 6 ; Appomattox Court House, 
April 9, 1865. 

Ahreets, William F. — Age 16 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. D, April 11, 1865; 
mustered out with company June 27, 1865, in defences of Washington, 
D. C. 

Benoit, Francis — Age 19 3^ears. Enlisted at Princetown to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. E, March 21, 1865; mus- 
tered out June 22, 1865, at U. S. Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Boyle, Patrick — Age 26 years. Enlisted September 10, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 19, 1864; discharged for disability February 20, 1865, at Car- 
ver Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Burgess, George — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, April 4, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 27, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Carey, Seymour A. — Age 18 years. Enlisted March 18, 1865, at 
Niskayuna to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. K, March 
21, 1865; mustered out to date June 27, 1865, at Ira Harris Hospital, 
Albany, N. Y. 

Carney, James — Age 35 years. Enlisted at Brooklyn, (near Schen- 
ectady) to serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. I, Jul)^ 
27, 1864; transferred to Co. E, November 19, 1864; died of disease, 
December 21, 1864, at Patrick Station, Va. 

Carter, James D. — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. A, April 5, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. C, 
as James S. 

Casey, William — Age 23 years. Enlisted at Glenville to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private; unassigned April 3, 1865; no 
further record. 

Caw, David J. — Age 26 years. Enrolled September 25, 1861, at 
Charlton to serve three years; mustered in as first sergeant Co. H, 
October i, 1861; as second lieutenant June i, 1862; as captain Co. E, 
October 4, 1862; transferred to Co. H, December 28, 1862; to Co. D, 
November 19, 1864; mustered in as major January 2, 1865; as lieu- 



302 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

tenant-colonel, to date December 14, 1864; wounded in action April 
2, 1865, at Petersburg, Va. ; mustered out with regiment June 27, 
1865, in defence of Washington, D. C. ; commissioned second lieu- 
tenant March 21, 1862, with rank from January 30, 1862; vice G. D. 
Storey promoted; first lieutenant September 23, 1862, with rank 
from May 31, 1862; vice G. D. Storey resigned ; captain, December 
10, 1862, with rank from October 4, 1862; vice L. Wood, dismissed; 
major December 20, 1864, with rank from November 19, 1864; 
vice N. S. Babcock promoted; lieutenant-colonel, December 24, 
1864, with rank from December 13, 1864; vice N. S. Babcock mus- 
tered out; colonel, not mustered July 6, 1865, with rank from Janu- 
ary I, 1865; vice W. B. French not mustered. 

Caw, William — Age 19 years. Enrolled at Scotia to serve three 
years, and mustered in as corporal Co. H, October 17, 1861 ; promoted 
sergeant June 18, 1863; re-enlisted as a veteran January 2, 1864; 
wounded in action May 18, 1864, at Spottsylvania, Va. ; promoted first 
sergeant Co. D, November 19, 1864; mustered in as second lieutenant 
Co. B, January 28, 1865; mustered out with company June 27, 1865, 
in defense of Washington, D. C. 

Clark, Louis — Age 20 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year, and mustered in as private, unassigned, October 3, 1864; no 
further record. 

Coffenger, William — Age 18 years. Enlisted July 20, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. B, July 
27, 1864; mustered out with company June 27, 1865, in defence of 
Washington, D. C. ; also borne as Coffinger. 

Cramer, Abram — Age 18 years. Enlisted in Scotia to serve three 
years, and mustered in as private Co. H, October 17, 1861; wounded 
in action October 19, 1864, at Cedar Creek, Va. ; mustered out with 
company December 13, 1864, at Saratoga Springs, N. Y. ; also borne 
as Craina. 

Davis, Henry J. — Age 28 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. B, August 15, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Co. D, November 19, 1864; mustered out with company 
June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. C. 

Doyle, Henry H. — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. D, April 5, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. C. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 303 

Duboise, Andrew J. — Age 28 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. B, August 15, 1864; 
transferred to Co. D, November 19, 1864; discharged for disability 
May 13, 1865, at Danville, Va., as Debois. 

Edwards, George L. — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. A, April 5, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. 

C. ; also borne as George T. 

Farmer, George — Age 37 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered iij as private Co. E, February i, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, 

D. C. 

Farrell, Andrew — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. E, April 12, 1865; mustered 
out to date June 27, 1865, at Albany, N. Y. ; also borne as Ferrel. 

Fell, Charles E. H. — Age 19 years. Enlisted November 31, 1864, 
at Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. C, 
March 3, 1865; mustered out with company June 27, 1865, at Wash- 
ington, D C. 

Gates, Stephen C. — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. C, October 8, 1861 ; 
re- enlisted as a veteran December 24, 1863; transferred to Co. A, 
November 19, 1864; mustered out with company June 27, 1865, in 
defense of Washington, D. C. 

Green, Isaac — Age 24 years. Enlisted at Duanesburgh to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. A, March 25, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, 
D. C. 

Harrison, James W. — Age 18 years. Enlisted March 21, 1865, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. C, March 
31, 1865; mustered out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of 
Washington, D. C. 

Hovey, Henry — Age 26 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. B, August 15, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Co. D, November 19, 1864; mustered out with detachment 
June 16, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. C. 

Howe, Benjamin — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. A, April 10, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. C. 



304 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Jervis, Courteen — Age 30 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. A, April 8, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. C. ; 
also borne as Coustein Jarvis. 

Johnson, William H. — (2d) Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady 
to serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. B, August 13, 1864; 
transferred to Co. D, November 19, 1864; to Co. B, 46th Infantry 
December 16, 1864. 

Krank, Joseph— Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. B, August 12, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Co. D, November 19, 1864; to Co. K, 46th Infantry May 17, 
1865. 

Mathews, Alfus H. — Age 17 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. A, April 3, 1865; 
mustered out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, 
D. C. 

McConkie, George — Age 16 years. Enlisted January 16, 1865, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. C, Janu- 
ary 17, 1865; also borne as McConkey, recruit; never joined regiment. 

McCumber, Alonzo — Age 42 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. H, October i, 1861; 
discharged for disability September 21, 1862, at Fortress Monroe, Va. 

Mero, George — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. A, April i, 1865; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 14, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Myert, Lawrence — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Princetown to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. E, March 21, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, 
D. C, as Myatt. 

Newman, Jacob — Age 30 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. K, August 29, 1864; 
transferred to Co. B, Noveinber 19, 1864; absent on furlough since 
June 19, 1865, and at muster out of company; also borne as Newnan. 

Nichels, Franklin J. — Age 27 years. Enlisted at Glenville to serve 
three years and mustered in as private Co. D, January 5, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, 
D. C, as Nichols. 

Premean, Joseph— Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. D, April 10, 1865; mus- 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 305 

tered out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, 
D. C, as Premeau. 

Quant, Frederick — Age 40 years. Enlisted August 28, 1862, at 
Schenectady to serve to three years; mustered in as private Co. H, 
Octobers, 1862; transferred to Co. D, November 19, 1864; to 23d 
Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Veteran Reserve Corps, April 22, 1865; 
mustered out July 20, 1865, at Washington, D. C. ; also borne as 
Quants. 

Quivey, Aaron B. — Age 22 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve three years arid mustered in as private Co. C, October 8, 1861; 
promoted commissary-sergeant June 6, 1862; discharged for disa- 
bility February 8, 1863, at camp near White Oak Church, Va. ; again 
enlisted and mustered in as private Co. C, January 20, 1864; killed in 
action May 21, 1864, at Spottsylvania, Va. ; also borne as Quincy. 

Rellinger, John— Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. B, April 5, 1865; inus- 
tered out v^ith compan}- June 27, 1865, i^ defense of Washington, 
D. C. 

Schoonmaker, William— Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. B, April 10, 1865; 
mustered out with company June 27, 1865, ^^ defense of Washington, 
D. C. 

Shannon, Oscar— Age 16 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, April 11, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 27, 1865, ^^ defense of Washington, D. C. 

Shaw, John — Age 24 years. Enlisted at Princetown to serve three 
years, and mustered in as private Co. C, March 21, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 27, 1865, ^^ defense of Washington, D. C. 

Stone, George — Age 28 years. Enlisted at Glenville to serve two 
years, and mustered in as private, unassigned, April 3, 1865; mus- 
tered out with detachment May 9th, T865, at Hart's Island, New 
York Harbor. 

Storms, George M. — Age 42 years. Enlisted at Duanesburgh to 
serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. E, March 24, 1865; 
mustered out with company June 27, 1865, ^^ defense of Washington, 
D. C. 

Tefft, Nathan— Age 37 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, September 7, 1864; trans- 



3o6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

ferred to Co. A, November 19, 1864; mustered out with detachment 
June 16, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. C. 

Thompson, James — Age 19 years. Enlisted at Rrookl}^, (near 
Schenectady) to serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. F, 
July 7, 1864; transferred to Co. E, November 19, 1864; mustered out 
with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. C. 

Van Steenburgh, Jacob — Age 23 years. Enlisted at Schenectady 
to serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. B, August 22, 
1864; transferred to Co. D, November 19, 1864; mustered out with 
detachment June 16, 1865, at Washington, D. C. ; also borne as 
Vansteinburgh. 

Vroman, Nelson— Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. C, March 31, 1865; mus- 
tered out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, 
D. C. 

Watson, John E. — Age 23 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year and mustered in as private Co. E, April i, 1865; mustered 
out with company June 27, 1865, in defense of Washington, D. C. 

Wilcox, Charles E. — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Niskayuna to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. E, March 21, 1865; mus- 
tered out June 16. 1865, at Baltimore, Md. 

FORTY-THIRD REGIMENT OF INFANTRY (VETERAN). 
Albany and Yates' Rifles ; Vinton Rifles. 

This regiment, Col. Francis L. Vinton, received its state designa- 
tion September 18, 1861 ; was organized at x^lbany and there mus- 
tered in the service of the United States for three years, in August 
and September, 1861. The Yates' Rifles, recruited by Colonel L. 
Ayer, four incomplete companies, A, B, C and D, were consolidated 
into two companies, and, September 18, 1861, assigned to this regi- 
ment. A company of the Manhattan Rifles, Colonel. J. M. Freeman, 
and of the United States Vanguard, Colonel William Northedge, 
were also attached to the regiment, and its organization completed. 

The companies were recruited principally : A, B and D at Albany, 
C at Albany and Oneonta, E at Canajoharie, F at Sandy Hill, G, 
Manhattan Rifles, at Schenectady, H and I, Yates' Rifles, at New 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 307 

York City, and K, United States Vanguard, at Cooperstown. The 
companies joining in October, 1862, were recruited at Albany. 

The regiment left the state September 21, 1861 ; served at and 
near Washington, D. C, from September 22, 1861; in Hancock's 
Brigade, Smith's Division, A. P., from October 15, 1861 ; in First 
Brigade, Smith's Division, Fourth Corps, A. P., from March 13, 
1862 ; in First Brigade, Second Division, Sixth Corps, A. P., from 
May, 1862 ; in the Light Brigade, Sixth Corps, during the Chancel- 
lorsville campaign ; after that in the Third Brigade, Second Division, 
Sixth Corps, A. P., and it was honorably discharged and mustered 
out June 27th, 1865, under Colonel Charles A. Milliken, at Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

The regiment lost, during the service by death, killed in action, 9 
officers, 74 enlisted men ; of wounds received in action, 4 officers, 
30 enlisted men ; of disease and other causes, i officer, 126 enlisted 
men ; total 14 officers, 230 enlisted men ; aggregate 244 ; of whom 
32 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy; and it took part in 
the following engagements, etc. : Vienna and Flint Hill, Va., Feb- 
ruary 22 ; Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 5 to May 4 ; Lee's Mills, 
April 16 and 28; Williamsburg, Va., May 5; Garnett's and Golding's 
Farms, June 27 and 28; Savage Station, June 29 ; White Oak 
Swamp Bridge, June 30; Malvern Hill, July i ; Sugar Loaf Moun- 
tain, Md., September lo-ii ; Crampton Pass, Md., September 14; 
Antietam, Md., September 17 ; Fredericksburg, Va., December 11-15, 
1862 ; Marye's Heights and Salem Church, Va., May 3-4 ; Deep Run 
Crossing, Va., June 5 ; Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3 ; Fairfield, Pa., July 
5 ; Antietam and Marsh Run, Md., July 7 ; near Leitersburg, Md., 
July 10; Funkstown, Md., July 11-13 ; Williamsport, Md., July 14; 
Auburn, Va., October 13; Rappahannock Station, Va., November 
7; Mine Run campaign, November 26-December 2, 1863; Wilder- 
ness, Va., May 5-7 ; Spottsylvania Court Hause, Va., May 8 to 21 ; 
North Anna, Va., May 22-26; Totopotomoy, Va., May 27-31 ; Cold 
Harbor, Va., June 1-12 ; before Petersburg, Va., June 18 to April 2, 
1864-5 ; assault of Petersburg, Va., June 18-19 ; Weldon Railroad, 
Va., June 21-23; Fort Stevens, D. C, July 12-13; Charleston, W. 
Va., August 21 ; Opequon Creek, Va., September 13 ; Opequon, Va., 



3o8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

September 19; Fisher's Hill, Va., September 22; Cedar Creek, Va., 
October 19, 1864; Petersburg Works, Va., March 25; Appomattox 
campaign, Va., March 28 to April 9, 1865. 

Becker, Albert — Age 32 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
September 16, 186 [; died of disease February 3, 1862, at Camp 
Griffin, Va. 

Conklin, John — Age 43 years. Enlisted October 8, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, October 9, 
1861; transferred to Company C, July 18, 1862; died July 31, 1862, at 
Harrison's Landing, Va. ; also borne as John Conklin. 

Deacon, Joseph — Age 23 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private, unassigned, July 6, 1864; no 
further record. 

Donelly, Patrick — Age 41 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years ; mustered in as private Co. G, 
September 16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; discharged 
for disability, January 30, 1863, near Yorktown, Va. ; also borne as 
Patrick Donnelly. 

Doty, Daniel E. — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 16, 1861; promoted corporal April 7, 1862; transferred to Co. 
C, July 18, 1862; captured and paroled, no dates; re-enlisted as a 
veteran December 25, 1863; killed in action May 6. 1864, at the Wil- 
derness, Va. ; also borne as Daniel K. Doty. 

Doyle, Michael — Age 32 years. Enlisted August 24, 186 1, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
September 16, 1861; transferred to Company C, July 18, 1S62; pro- 
moted corporal and returned to ranks, no dates; transferred to 
Veteran Reserve Corps December 9, 1863. 

Gilfillan, William H. — Age 19 years. Enrolled August 14, 1861, at 
New York City to serve three years; mustered in as sergeant Co. G, 
September 16, 1861; as second lieutenant January 24, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; mustered in as first lieutenant, Sep- 
tember 19, 1862; as captain Co. A, June 2, 1863; killed July 3, 1863, 
at Gettysburg, Pa. ; commissioned second lieutenant March 4, 1862, 
with rank from January 24, 1862, vice V. V. Van Patten, promoted; 
first lieutenant, October 17, 1862, with rank from September 24, 1862, 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR 



309 



vice John Fryer, promoted; captain, May 26, 1863, with rank from 
May 3, 1863, vice H. B. Knickerbocker, killed. 

Gray, John — Age 22 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve three 
years, and mustered in as private Co. G, October 17, i86r; died of 
disease April 26, 1862, at camp in the field. 

Kane, Patrick — Age 35 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years ; mustered in as private Co G, Sep- 
tember 16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; re-enlisted as a 
veteran December 24, 1863; wounded in action May 10, 1864, at 
Spotsylvania, Va. ; transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps September 
16, 1864, as Patrick Kain; mustered out July 24, 1865, at Washing- 
ton, D. C, as of Co. H, 14th Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps; also 
borne as Patrick Keain. 

Koch, Frederick — Age 35 years. Enlisted August 24, i86r, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; discharged for 
disability April 11, 1863; also borne as Frederick Cook. 

Luckey, James — Age 32 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; discharged for 
disability January 30, 1863. 

McCauley, John — Age 34 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; captured and 
paroled, no dates; transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps July 20, 
1863; also borne as John McCauly. 

McDonald, James — Age 34 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; re-enlisted as a 
veteran December 24, 1863; transferred to Co. D, December 31, 
1863; re-transferred to Co. C; no date. 

McKerlie, Cornelius — Age 18 years. Enlisted October 11, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 14, 1861 ; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; captured and 
paroled, no dates; re-enlisted as a veteran December 24, 1863; 
wounded in action May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Va., and absent at 
muster out of company. 

McReiley, James — Age 18 years. Enlisted October ii, 1861, at 

21 



3IO SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 14, 1861 ; no further record. 

Miers. John G. — Age 24 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; captured and 
paroled, no dates; re-enlisted as a veteran December 24, 1863; 
wounded in action March 25, 1865, near Petersburg, Va. ; discharged 
for wounds August 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. ; also borne as John 
Meirs, John G. Meirs and John G. Myers. 

Mullen, John — Age 42 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, September 
16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; also borne as John 
Millar. 

Neils, John — Age 30 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, September 
16, 1861; promoted corporal, no date; wounded in action June 27, 
1862, at Gaines Mills, Va. ; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; died 
of disease August 29, 1862, at Alexandria, Va. 

Rivers, Charles — Age 28 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private, unassigned, July 6, 1864; no 
further record. 

Rose, Edward — Age 19 years. Enlisted October 23, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 25, 1861; wounded in action June 27, 1862, at Gaines Mills, 
Va. ; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; discharged October 29, 1864, 
in the field. 

Seaman, Erastus — Age 38 years. Enlisted October 16, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 17, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; re-enlisted as a 
veteran December 24, 1863; transferred to Co. I, April 17, 1864; pro- 
moted sergeant April 18, 1864; wounded in action July 12, 1864, at 
Fort Stevens, Washington, D. C. ; died from wounds July 25, 1864, at 
Mount Pleasant Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Seely, Henry C. — Age 35 j^ears. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 16, 1861; wounded in action June 27, 1862, at Gaines Mills, 
Va. ; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; died October 3, 1862, at 
hospital, Washington, D. C. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 



3ii 



Seider, Carl Augustus — Age 34 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, 
at Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
September 16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July i8, 1862; captured 
and paroled, no dates; sergeant January 15, 1865; first sergeant 
March i, 1865; mustered out with company June 27, 1865, at Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; also borne as Carl A. Seider and Karl A. Seider. 

Shaver, William H. — Age 38 years. Enlisted October 17, 186 1, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 18, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862. 

Shearer, Mathew — Age 22 years. Enlisted October 3, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 9, 1861; discharged March 10, 1862, at New York City. 

Shearer, William — Age 26 years. Enlisted October 10, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 14, 1861 ; wounded in action June 27, 1862, at Gaines Mills, 
Va ; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; discharged for disability 
August 12, 1862; also borne as William Shearer. 

Smith, John — Age 35 years. Enlisted August 24. 1861, at Schenec- 
tady to serve three years; mustered in as corporal Co. G, September 
16, 1861 ; promoted sergeant Co. C, July 18, 1862; returned to ranks 
June 21, 1863; re-enlisted as veteran December 24, 1863; killed in 
action March 25, 1865, near Petersburg, Va. 

Van Eps, John E. — Age 38 years. Enlisted October 8, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 9, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; also borne as 
John E. Van Epp. 

Wait, George W. — Age ig years. Enlisted October 18, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 19, 1861. 

Walser, Mathew — Age 42 years. Enlisted October 7, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 9, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; discharged 
October 29, 1864, in the field. 

Wenzell, Andrew — Age 27 years. Enlisted August 24, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
September 16, 1861; transferred to Co. C, July 18, 1862; also borne 
as Andrew Wentzel. 



312 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

SECOND REGIMENT OF CAVALRY (VETERAN). 
Empire Light Cavalry. 

June 23d, 1863, Col. Morgan H. Chrysler received authority to 
re-organize the 30th New York Vol. Infantry, then discharged by 
reason of the expiration of its term of service, as a regiment of 
cavalry — the Empire Light Cavalry. July 20th, 1863, this designa- 
tion was changed to Second Regiment Veteran Cavalry. The 
regiment was organized at Saratoga Springs, and the companies were 
mustered in the service of the United States for three years at Sara- 
toga : A, on August 15 ; B and F, Aug. 26 ; C, September 9 ; D and 
E, September 8 ; G and H, October 10 and 16, respectively ; I and 
K, November 10; L, December 3, 1863; and at the Cavalry Depot, 
D. C, M, December 30, 1863. 

They were recruited principally : A, at Glens Falls ; B, at Albany, 
Amsterdam and Schenectady ; C, at Saratoga ; D, at Saratoga, 
Salem, Schroon, Shushan and Whitehall ; E, at Glens Falls, Albany, 
Port Henry and Troy ; F, at Saratoga and Whitehall ; G, at Sara- 
toga, Glens Falls, Addison, Bath and Schenectady ; H, at Hoosick 
Falls, Malone and Plattsburgh ; I, at Queensbury, Saratoga and 
Stony Creek ; L, at Saratoga, Chesterfield, Jay, Fort Ann, Northum- 
berland and Wilton ; and M, at New York City. 

The regiment left the state in detachments : Companies A, B and 
C, in August ; D, E and F, in September ; G and H, in October ; I 
and K, in November; L and ]\I, in December, 1863 ; and served in 
the Department of Washington, D. C, 2 2d Corps ; in the Depart- 
ment of the Gulf from February' 16, 1864 ; in the Fifth Cavalry 
Brigade, 19th Corps ; in the Fourth Cavalry Brigade, 19th Corps, 
from June, 1864 ; in the First Cavalry Brigade, 19th Corps, from 
September, 1 864 ; in the Separate Brigade, Cavalry of the Reserve, 
19th Corps, from November, 1864; in the First Brigade, Cavalry 
Division, Department of the Gulf, from March, 1865 ; and com- 
manded by Col. Chrysler, was honorably discharged and mustered 
out November 8, 1865, ^^ Talladega, Ala. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 



31: 



During its service it lost by death, killed in action, 2 officers, 10 
enlisted men ; of wounds received in action, 3 officers, 20 enlisted 
men ; of disease and other causes, 3 officers, 215 enlisted men ; total, 
8 officers, 245 enlisted men ; aggregate, 253, of whom 7 enlisted men 
died in the hands of the enemy. The large number of men reported 
drowned is owing to the loss at the foundering of the steamer North 
America off the coast of Florida, December 2 2d, 1864. The regi- 
ment, or portions of it, took part in the following engagements, etc.: 
Red River campaign. La.; Little Washington, Campti, Pleasant Hill, 
Sabine Cross Roads, Pleasant Hill, Fort Jessup, Bayou Sallina, 
Yellow Bayou, Campti Bayou, below Cloutersville, Cane River 
Crossing, Bayou Roberts, Mansura, Bayau de Glaize, Simsport, Bayou 
Fordice, Atchafalaya River, La.; Bayou Gross Tete, La.; scout near 
Morganiza, La.; Franklin, La.; Morganiza, La.; Maringuin, La.; 
Rosedale, La.; Gross Tete, La.; College Hill, Miss.; between Jackson 
and Clinton, La.; St. Francisville, La.; Bayou Sarah, La.; Fausse 
River, La.; Clinton and Liberty Creek, Miss.; State Line, Pascagoula 
River, Miss.; McLeod's Mills, La.; College Hill, Fla.; Pine Barren 
Creek, Fla.; Cotton Creek, Fla.; Bluff Springs, Fla.: Pollard, Ala.; 
Fort Blakely, Ala.; Mt. Pleasant, Ala.; Whistler's Station, Ala. 

Adams, Charles — Ag-e 27 years. Enlisted August 17, 1863, ^^ 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, ^^ serve 
three years. 

Adams, George — Age 21 years, Enlisted July 9, 1863, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, ^d serve three 
years. 

Allen, Joseph — Age 26 years. Enlisted August 17, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Anderson, Thomas — Age 20 years. Enlisted July 30. 1863, ^t 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 5, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Baker, Paul— Age 28 years. Enlisted August 21, 1863, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve three 
years; remarks on company muster out roll; discharged, no official 
notice received. 



3f4 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Ballon, Horace — Age 29 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. L, August 31, 1864, to serve 
one year; mustered out with detachment August 23, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala. 

Bennett, Othello — Age 18 years. Enlisted December 28, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private, unassigned, January 5, 1864, to 
serve three years; no further record. 

Bidwell, Homer A. — Age 18 years. Enlisted July 8, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, July 20, 1863, to serve 
three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala. 

Binck, Edward S. — Age 27 years. Enlisted August 15, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 20, 1863, to serve 
three years; appointed corporal August 26, 1863; mustered out with 
company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. ; also borne as 
Edward C. S. Binch. 

Bink, Wilhelmus — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 15, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 20, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Brougham, W. M. H. — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 12, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 14, 1863, to serve 
three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala. ; see Braugham. 

Brown, James — Age 19 years. Enlisted December 16, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. D, December 26, 1863, to 
serve three years. 

Burnham, Lansing — Age 27 years. Enlisted July i, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, July 20, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Campbell, Allen — Age 38 years. Enlisted July 24, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Carr, Joseph — Age 22 years. Enlisted August 3, 1863, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve three 
years. 

Case, Sherman A. — Age 19 years. Enlisted September 22, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, October 10, 1863, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. B, October 15, 1863; appointed first 
sergeant, date not stated; mustered in as second lieutenant May i, 



i864, 


at 


1864, 


to 


1865, 


at 


1864, 


at 


1864, 


to 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 315 

1865; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, 
Ala. ; commissioned second lieutenant January 20, 1865, with rank 
from November 13, 1864, vice Shaw, discharged. 

Castentine, Julius — Age 28 years. Enlisted December 16, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, December 17, 1863, to 
serve three years; mustered out October 30, 1865, at New Orleans as 
Julius Castenbine; also borne as James Castlebein. 

Clute, Harry C. — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 8, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years ; appointed sergeant, date not stated ; mustered out with 
company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. ; also borne as Harry 
C. Clate. 

Cole, David W. — Age 22 years. Enlisted September 2, 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, September 6, 
serve one year; discharged with detachment August 24, 
Talladega, Ala. 

Coles, Orrin S. — Age 18 years. Enlisted September i, 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, September- 1, 
serve one year; mustered out August 24, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

Combs, Dwight — Age 18 years. Enlisted July 22, 1863, ^^ Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. F, August 3, 1863, to serve three 
years; transferred to Co. C, date not stated ; discharged March 28, 
1864, for disability, at New Orleans, La. 

Dailey, Joseph — Age 21 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, September 6, 1864, to 
serve one year; discharged August 24, 1865, ^^ Talladega, Ala. 

Darrow, Daniel, Jr. — Age 22 years. Enlisted August 10, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years; appointed quartermaster-sergeant, date not stated; cap- 
tured, date not stated; exchanged May 27, 1865; discharged Septem- 
ber 4, 1865, at Albany, N. Y. 

Dean, Andrew, Jr. — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 11, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Dedrick, Henry H. — Age 18 years. Enlisted July 22, 
Schenectady; mustered in as private, Co. B, August 26, 
serve three years; mustered out November 8, 1865. 

Deere, William— Age 18 years. Enlisted August 10, 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863 



1863, 


at 


1863, 


to 


1863, 


at 


to serve 



3i6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala., as William Deree. 

Dollar, Robert G. — Age 40 years. Enlisted July 23, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years; discharged March 17, 1864, for disability. 

Donnelly, James — Age 21 years. Enlisted July 31, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Dorn, John G. — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 10, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years. Died; no official notification of death received. 

Doty, George E. — Age 29 years. Enlisted February 22, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F. February 29, 1864, to 
serve three years; absent on furlough since October 15, 1865, and at 
muster out of company, November 8, 1865; no further record. 

Duclos, Edward — Age 22 years. Enlisted February 24, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, February 24, 1864, to 
serve three. years; transferred to i42d Regiment, Second Battalion, 
V. R. C, date not stated; mustered out with detachment, November 
30, 1865, at New Orleans, La. 

Dunnigan, Patrick— Age 25 years. Enlisted July 3, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 5, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Edward, Thomas — Age 19 years. Enlisted July 30, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 5, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Farthing, Lucius M. — Age 20 years. Enlisted December 11, 1863, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. D, December 14, 1863, to 
serve three years; appointed corporal, date not stated; mustered out 
with company November 8, 1865, ^t Talladega, Ala. 

Fitzgerald, James — Age 22 years. Enlisted August 20, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, October 6, 1863, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. B, October 15, 1863; mustered out 
with company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

Fosmire, George — Age 28 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, September 5, 1864, to 
serve one year; discharged with detachment August 24, 1865. at 
Talladega, Ala. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 



317 



Garding-, Frederick W. — Age 23 years. Enlisted September 21, 
1863, at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, October 10, 
1863; mustered out with company Novembers, 1865, at Talladega, 
Ala. ; veteran. 

Gillespie, John — Age 18 years. Enlisted July 25, 1863, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 20, 1863, to serve three 
3^ears; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, 
Ala., as Gillespia. 

Godetto, Napoleon — Age 21 years. Enlisted January 27, 1864, at 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. E, February 16, 1864, to 
serve three years ; mustered out with company, November 8, 1865, 
at Talladega, Ala. 

Heyser, Jacob C. — Age 23 years. Enlisted August 10, 1863, at 
Schenectady ; mustered in as corporal Co. B, August 26, 1863, to 
serve three years; mustered out with company, November 8, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. 

Hogan, Frank — Age 18 years. Enlisted July 10, 1863, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve three 
years. 

Hogan, Isaac — Age — years. Enlisted December 14, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, December 14, 1863, to 
serve three years; mustered out July n, 1865, at New York City. 

Horton, George J. — Age 22 years. Enlisted July 13, 1863, at Sche- 
nectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years; mustered out with company, November 8, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala. 

Jacobson, Henry — Age 22 years. Enlisted August 18, 1863, at Sche- 
nectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala. 

Johnson, Charles W. — Age 21 years. Enlisted August 7, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, October 6, 1863, to serve 
three years; appointed first sergeant October 10, 1863; mustered in 
as second lieutenant, December 29, 1863, as first lieutenant and regi- 
mental quartermaster, December i, 1864; discharged August 27, 
1865, for absence without leave; conmissioned second lieutenant, 
December 14, 1863, with rank from December 5, 1863, original; first 
lieutenant and quartermaster, September i, 1864, with rank from 
September i, 1864, vice Carter, promoted. 



3i8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Johnson, Stephen E. — Age 25 years. Enlisted July 2, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years; transferred, June 22, 1864, to V. R. C. 

Ladd, George W. B. — Age 22 years. Enlisted July 2, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, July 20, 1863, to serve 
three years; appointed first sergeant, date not stated; mustered out 
with company, November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

Lake, Emmet J. — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, September 3, 1864, to 
serve one year; mustered out with detachment, August 23, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. 

La Rue, Samuel — Age 26 years. Enlisted July 14, 1863, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. B, July 20, 1863, to serve three 
years; mustered out with company, NovemlDcr 8, 1865, at Talladega, 
Ala. ; prior service Co. A, Eighteenth New York Volunteers. 

Lepper, Jacob H. — Age 24 years. Enlisted August 8, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 20, 1863, to serve 
three years; died of disease, March 17, 1864, at New Orleans, La. 

Linn, Archibald L. — Age 23 years. Enlisted July 6, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as sergeant Co. B, October 31, 1863, to 
serve three years; died of disease September 13, 1864, at New 
Orleans, La. 

Lintner, John — Age 23 years. Enlisted August 19, 1863, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 20, 1863, to serve three 
years; prior service Co. B, 32d N. Y. Vol. 

Luffman, Peter M. — Age 21 years. Enlisted July 8, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 14, 1863, to serve 
three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala. 

McCarty, James — Age ^^ years. Enlisted December 16, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, December 18, 1863, to 
serve three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. ; veteran. 

McDonald, Nelson — Age 25 years. Enlisted July 10, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, July 20, 1863, to serve 
three years; appointed saddler, date not stated; mustered out with 
company, November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. ; veteran. 

McGuire, Frank — Age 23 years. Enlisted July 27, 1863, at Schenec- 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 319 

tady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve three 
years. 

Manning, James W. — Age 31 years. Enlisted August 19, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years; appointed sergeant, no date stated; died May 5, 1864, of 
disease at New Orleans, La. 

Mathews, Clay — Age 21 years. Enlisted August 29, 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, September 5, 
serve one year; discharged with detachment August 24, 
Talladega, Ala. 

Meede, James H. — Age 20 years. Enlisted September 2, 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, September 6, 
serve one year; discharged with detachment, August 24, 
Talladega, Ala. 

Miller, William — Age 18 years. Enlisted, August 10, 
Schenectad}^; mustered in as private Co. B, August 14, 1863, 
three years. 

Miller, William J. — Age 21 years. Enlisted July 22, 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, 
three years; mustered out with company November 8, 
Talladega, Ala. 

Mills, James H. — Age 18 years. Enlisted December 14, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. I, Dec. 14, 1863, to serve 
three years; drowned at sea December 20, 1864. 

Mingo, Charles — Age 29 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. C, August 31, 1864, to serve 
one year; discharged August 22, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

Moffatt, William H. — Age 44 years. Enlisted August 13, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 20, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Murphy, John — Age 19 years. Enlisted July 30, 1863, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve three 
years. 

Penny, Francis Age 18 years. Enlisted August 27, 1863, at 

S':henectady ; mustered in as private Co. G, October i, 1863, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. B, October 15, 1863; mustered out 
with company Novembers, 1865, at Talladega, Ala.; also borne as 
Francis Perroy. 



1864, 


at 


1864, 


to 


1865, 


at 


, 1864, 


at 


. 1864, 


to 


1865, 


at 


1863, 


at 


to serve 


1863, 


at 


to serve 


1865, 


at 



320 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Perry, Frank C. — Age 21 years. Enlisted July 13, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Perry, Jacob L. — Age 21 years. Enlisted July 14, 1863, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve three 
years; appointed sergeant, date not stated; died of disease March 25, 
1864, at Cavalry Depot, D. C. 

Pierson, Orson — Age 21 years. Enlisted September 18, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, October 6, 1863, to serve 
three years; transferred October 15, 1863, to Co. B; appointed cor- 
poral, date not stated; sergeant May 5, 1865. 

Powers, John — Age 44 years. Enlisted, date not stated, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, February 29. 1864, to 
serve three years; sick in New Orleans, La., hospital since February 
28, 1865; mustered out of company November 8, 1865; no further 
record. 

Saxton, Edward — Age 38 years. Enlisted August 3, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Schermerhorn, Brey C.^ — Age 28 years. Enlisted August 10, 1863, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863. to 
serve three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. ; also borne as Bracey T. Schemehorn. 

Schermerhorn, Henry — Age 28 years. Enlisted August 13, 1863, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to 
serve three years. Prior service Co. E, i8th N. Y. Vols. 

Schneider, Frederick — Age 40 years. Enlisted July 13, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala. ; also borne as Frederick Snyder; veteran. 

Serberking, Frederick — Age 28 years. Enlisted August 20, 1863, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to 
serve three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala., as Seiberking; veteran. 

Shuster, George — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 12, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years ; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala.; veteran. 



1864, 


at 


1864, 


to 


i865, 


at 


1864, 


at 


1864, 


to 


1865, 


at 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 321 

Simpson, James — Age 33 years. Enlisted August 10, 1863, at 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years ; appointed blacksmith, date not stated ; mustered out 
with company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

Small, James N. — Age 26 years. Enlisted January 14, 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private (^o. D, January 14, 
serve three years ; mustered out with company November 8, 
Talladega, Ala. 

Smith, Elias W. — Age 29 years. Enlisted August 25, 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. B, September 6, 
serve one year ; discharged with detachment August 24, 
Talladega, Ala. 

Smith, Henry — Age 21 years. Enlisted August 20, 1863, at 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863. to serve 
three years ; died of disease September 20, 1864, at New Orleans, 
La. 

Smith, Maus V. V. — Age 22 years. Enlisted September 5, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, September 2, 1864, to 
serve one year ; mustered out with detachment August 23, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. 

Smith, Thomas — Age 30 years. Enlisted as substitute August 
II, 1863, at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, August 11, 
1863, to serve three years ; mustered out with company November 
8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

Snyder, Henry — Age 21 years. Enlisted September 12, 1863, at 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. B, October 10, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Solomon, Peter — Age 34 years. Enlisted August' 9, 1863, at 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years ; appointed bugler, date not stated ; mustered out with 
company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala.; veteran. 

Southard, Isaac B. — Age 19 years. Enlisted August 5, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years. 

Starks, Daniel — Age 36 years. Enlisted December 7, 1863, at 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. B, December 7, 1863, to 
serve three years ; died of disease October 9, 1864, at New Orleans, 
La. 



322 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Steele, William — Age ^6 years. Enlisted August 19, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, October 10, 1863, to 
serve three years ; transferred to Co. B, October 15, 1863 ; mustered 
out with company Novembers, 1865, at Talladega, Ala.; prior ser- 
vice Co. D, 32d N. Y. Vols. 

Steenson, Charles D. — Age 19 years. Enlisted August 20, 1863, at 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years ; appointed corporal, date not .stated ; mustered out with 
company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

Van Debogart, James — Age 21 years. Enlisted August 3, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years ; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talla- 
dega, Ala. ; veteran. 

Van Nostrand, Kassan — Age 18 years. Enlisted September 7, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, September 7, 1864, to 
serve one year; discharged Ausgust 24, 1865, with detachment, at 
Talladega, Ala. 

Van Patten, John — Age 44 years. Enlisted December 15, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as piivate, Co. B, December 16, 1863, to 
serve three years; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. 

Van Vranken, Edward — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 8, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years; Co. M. O. R. remarks, no official notice of discharge 
received. 

Van Vranken, N. Allen — Age 19 years. Enlisted August 8, 1863, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to 
serve three years; died June 28, 1864, of disease at New Orleans, La. 

Van Vranken, Samuel — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 12, 1863, 
at Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to 
serve three years ; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. 

Vrooman, Jesse — Age 23 years. Enlisted August 17, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years ; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. 

Vrooman, W. M. — Age 21 years. Enlisted August 17, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 323 

three years ; appointed corporal, date not stated ; mustered out with 
company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

Walker, Epaphroditus — Age 31 years. Enlisted August 23, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, September 3, 1864, to 
serve one year ; mustered out with detachment August 23, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. 

Walker, Francis R. — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 20, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, August i, 1864, to serve 
one year ; appointed sergeant, date not stated ; mustered out with 
detachment August 23, 1865, at Talladega, Ala.; also borne as Walter, 
Francis Romaine. 

Waad, Andrew J.— Age 23 years. Enlisted August 7, 1863,- at 
Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to serve 
three years ; appointed commissary sergeant, date not stated ; 
mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

Wemple, William — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 25, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, September 5, 1864, to 
serve one year; discharged with detachment August 24, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala. 

Whitamore, Alonzo P. — Age 22 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, August 31, 1864, to 
serve one year; mustered out with detachment, August 23, 1865, at 
Talladega, Ala.; also borne as Whitmore, Alonzo. 

White, Emery J, — Age 21 years. Drafted, 1863, at Schenectady; 
mustered in as private Co. L. August 11, 1863, to serve three years ; 
appointed sergeant, date not stated ; mustered out with company 
November 8, 1865, at Talladega, Ala. 

White, Frank— Age 36 years. Enlisted August 12, 186-3, at Schenec- 
tady ; mustered in as private Co. B. August 26, 1863, to serve three 
years ; mustered out with company November 8, 1865, at Talladega, 
Ala. 

Whittes, John W. — Age 28 years. Enlisted September 5, 1864, at 
Niskayuna ; mustered in as private Co. B, September 7, 1864, to serve 
one year ; discharged with detachment, August 24, 1865, at Talladega, 
Ala. ; as Whittie, John W. 

Winnie, Hiram D. — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 3, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 26, 1863, to 
serve three years. 



324 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

SIXTY-NINTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY (VETERAN). 
First Regiment, Irish Brigade. 

, This regiment, Colonel Robert Nngent, originally recruited under 
special authority from the War Department, was turned over to the 
state September 2d, 1861, and organized in New York City as one 
of the regiments of the Irish, or Meagher's Brigade, November 2d, 
1861. It was mustered in the service of the United States for three 
years between September 7th and November 17th, 1861. A large 
number of the members of the 69th State Militia joined the regi- 
ment, on their return from their three months' service, and the 
majority of the men were recruited in New York City, Company D, 
however, principally at Chicago, 111.; Company F partly at Brooklyn 
and K partly at Buffalo. June 12, 1863, the regiment was consoli- 
dated into a battalion of two companies, A and B. In February, 
1864, this battalion returned from its veteran furlough with six com- 
panies, A, B, C, F, G and K ; B and F being the former companies 
B and A ; the others being newly organized. At the expiration of 
its term of service, those entitled thereto were mustered out and the 
regiment retained in service. 

The regiment left the state November i8th, 1861 ; served at Fort 
Corcoran, D. C, from November, 1861 ; in the Irish Brigade, Sum- 
ner's Division, A. P., from December, 1861 ; in the same. Second 
Brigade, Richardson's, First Division, Second Corps, A. P., from 
March, 1862, and it was honorably discharged and mustered out 
under Colonel Nugent June 30th, 1865, near Alexandria, Va. 

During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 8 
officers, 154 enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 5 officers, 
94 enlisted men; of disease and other causes, i officer, 150 enlisted 
men; total, 14 officers, 398 enlisted men ; aggregate, 412 ; of whom 
63 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy ; and it took part in 
the following engagements, etc.: Rappahannock Station, Va., March 
29 ; Siege of Yorktown, Va., April 16 to May 4 ; Fair Oaks, Va., 
May 31-June I ; Burnt Chimney, Va., June 19 ; Seven Days' Battle, 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 325 

Va., June 25 to July 2 ; Antietam, Md., September 17 ; near Charles- 
town, W. Va., October 16-17 ; Snicker's Gap, Va., November 2 ; 
Hartwood Church, Va., November 17; Fredericksburg, Va., Decem- 
ber 11-15, 1862; Chancellorsville, Va., May 1-3; Gettysburg, Pa., 
July 1-3 ; Williamsport, Md., July 14 ; Auburn, Va., October 14 ; 
Bristoe Station, Va., October 14 ; Mine Run campaign, Va., Novem- 
ber 26 to December 2, 1863; Wilderness, Va., May 5-7; Spotsyl- 
vania Court House, Va., May 8-21 ; North Anna, Va., May 22-26; 
Totopotomoy, Va., May 27-31 ; Cold Harbor, Va., June 1-12 ; before 
Petersburg, Va., June 15 to April 2, 1864-5; assault of Petersburg, 
Va., June 15-19; Weldon Railroad, Va., June 21-23 ; Deep Bottom, 
Va., July 27-29; Strawberry Plains, Va., August 14-18; Ream's Sta- 
tion, Va., August 25 ; Hatcher's Run, Va., December 8-9, 1864 ; 
Skinner's Farm, Va., March 25 ; Appomattox campaign, Va., March 
28 to April 9, 1865. 

Allen, James — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year; mustered in as private Co. H, August 30, 1864; died of disease, 
November 2, 1864, at Armory Square Hospital, Washington, D. C. ; 
also borne as James H. Allen. 

Banigan, Patrick — Age 29 years. Enlisted August 27, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; promoted sergeant, no date; first sergeant January 
I, 1865; mustered out with detachment, June 5, 1865, near Alexan- 
dria, Va. ; also borne as Bannegan and Bannigan. 

Barker, John L. — Age 19 years. Enlisted August" 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady, to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; wounded on picket. October 24, 1864, and absent at 
muster out of company; also borne as Baker. 

Bartholomew, Chester — Age 17 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, 
at Schenectady to serve three years ; mustered in as private Co. H, 
September 3, 1864; wounded in action, April 7, 1865, at Farmville, 
Va. ; mustered out on individual roll, July 11, 1865, at Lincoln Hos- 
pital, Washington, D. C, as Bartholony. 

Bass, Isaac — Age 17 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year; mustered in as private Co. H, August 29, 1864; mustered out 



326 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

with detachment, June 27, 1865, at Satterlee Hospital, West Phila- 
delphia, Pa. ; also borne as Boss. 

Bedell, William — Age 19 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. H, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va., also borne as Berdell and Burdell. 

Bop, Isaac, C. — Age 17 years. Enlisted August 20, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private, unassigned, 
September 3, 1864; never joined regiment. 

Bowers, George — Enlisted August 29, 1864, at Schenectady to serve 
one year; mustered in as private Co. H, September i, 1864; missing 
in action October 30, 1864; no record subsequent to April 30, 1865, 
as dropped. 

Broadley, Thomas — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 27, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; never joined company; also borne as Bradley. 

Burns, Dennis — Age 22 years. Enlisted September 2, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. I, Septem- 
ber 23, 1864; captured on picket October 30, 1864, at Petersburg, Va. 
recaptured at Salisbury, N..C. no date; mustered out on individual 
roll, August 14, 1865, at New York City. 

Burns, Taylor — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. H, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment, June 5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va. 

Bushmiller, Michael — Age 17 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year; mustered in as private Co. D, August 29, 1864; mus- 
tered out June 3, 1865, at Alexandria, Va. ; as Bushmaland. 

Campbell, John — Age 36 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. E, 
September 3. 1864; wounded in action March 25, 1865, at Hatcher's 
Run, Va. ; discharged for disability November 22, 1865, at Hare wood 
Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Cams, John S. — Age 42 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; never joined company. 

Carr, Richard — Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. D, August 29, 1864; pro- 



SOLDIERvS OF CIVIL WAR. 327 

moted corporal March i, 1865; mustered out June 5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va. 

Chase, Harlow — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. E, 
September 3, 1864; mustered out on individual roll. June 13, 1865, at 
Campbell United States Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Colomar, Edwin C. — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 27, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; promoted sergeant, no date; wounded March 25, 
1865; returned to ranks, no date; mustered out on individual roll, 
June 17, 1865, at Albany, N. Y., as Collamer; also borne as Collo- 
mar and Collomer. 

Conney, John G. — Age 26 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, vSep- 
tember 3, 1864; promoted first sergeant, no date; returned to ranks, 
January i, 1865; mustered out with detachment, May 13, 1865, at 
Mower General Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa., as John J. Connery. 

Ellis, John — Age 36 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at S':henec- 
tady to serve three years; mustered in as piivate Co. H, September 
3, 1864; absent without leave at muster out of company. 

Fabien, Max — Age 21 years. Enlisted August 27, 1864, at Schenec- 
tady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. E, September 
3, 1864; mustered out with company June 30, 1865, near Alexandria, 
Va., as Fabian. 

Force, Arthur W. — Age 16 years. Enlisted August 27, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment June .5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va. 

Grapzincke, Marsh W. — Age 24 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, 
at Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. H, 
September 3, 1864; absent without leave since October, 1864, and at 
muster out of company: also borne as Grapziuke and Grapzinli. 

Groff, Thomas — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va. 

Grover, Charles — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years; mustered in as private Co. D, August 29, 1864; also 
borne as Grouse and Gruse. 



328 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Halicus; Benjamin — Age 34 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with company June 30, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va. 

Hipe, Joseph — Age 44 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at Schenec- 
tady to serve one year; mustered in as private, unassigned, Sept.. 
3, 1864; wounded in camp, March 25, 1865; mustered out July 22, 
1865, ^t New York city; also borne as Haipt. 

Howe, George W. — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year; mustered in as private Co. D, August 29, 1864; Pro- 
moted corporal, January i, 1865; mustered out June 5, 1865, at 
Alexandria, Va. ; also borne as How. 

Kimball, Adam — Age 19 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va., as Hiram. 

Lambert, William — Age 25 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. D, 
August 30, 1864; mustered out June 5, 1865, at Alexandria Va. 

Lordell, John E. — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year ; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep-' 
tember 3, 1864 ; mustered out with detachment June 5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va., as John C. 

Losee, John C. — Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year ; mustered in as private Co. D, August 26, 1864 ; promoted 
corporal January i, 1865; sergeant May 13, 1865; mustered out June 
5, 1865, at Alexandria, Va. ; also borne as Losse and Lossee. 

Lynch, Mathew — Age 27 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years ; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864 ; mustered out with company June 30, 1865, near Alex- 
andria, Va. 

Manning, John — Age 30 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years; mustered in as private Co. D, August 29, 1864: wounded 
in action October 21, 1864, in front of Petersburg, Va. ; died of his 
wounds November 9, 1864, in hospital at City Point, Va. 

Marsh, William — Age ;^8 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. H, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; captured in action October 30, 1864, Petersburg, Va. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 



329 



sent to Salisbury, N. C, November 4, 1864, and absent at muster out 
of company ; also borne as Marsch. 

Mingay, Henry M. — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve three years; mustered in as private Co. D, August 29, 1864; 
promoted sergeant March 22, 1865; returned to ranks May 13, 1865; 
mustered out v^ith company June 30, 1865, at Alexandria. Va. ; also 
borne as Henry A. 

Morris, Frederick — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va. 

Morris, Jacob — Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one year, and 
mustered in as private Co. H, August 30, 1864 ; no record subsequent 
to April 30, 1865 ; as absent, missing in action October 30, 1864. 

Mowery, Daniel — Age 18 years. Enlisted Augt;st 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year ; mustered in as private Co. H, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; discharged for disability April 14, 1865, at Albany, 
N. Y. ; also borne as Moury and Mowry. 

Osman, Gilbert R. — Age 19 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; discharged for disability July 5, 1865, at Harewood 
General Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Renzie, Michael — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year ; mustered in as private Co. H, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; promoted corporal Septembers, 1864; missing in 
action October 30, 1864, near Petersburg, Va. ; absent at muster out 
of company ; also borne as Rienzie and as Reinze .and Renzie, 
Michaels. 

Reynolds, George E. — Age 17 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. H, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864 ; mustered out with detachment June 5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va. ; also borne as G. William Reynolds; prior service in 
Co. H, 177th Infantry. 

Robinson, John — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. I, September 2, 1864 ; cap- 
tured on picket October 30, 1864, at Petersburg, Va. ; paroled, no 
date; mustered out on individual roll August 4, 1865, at New York 
City. 



330 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Sicby, Jerome — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; killed in action March 25, 1865, at Fort Stedman, 
Va. ; also borne as Sixby. 

Sullivan, Dennis — Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. D, August 29, 1864; 
wounded November 29, 1864, in front of Petersburg, Va. ; mustered 
out June 5, 1865, at Alexandria, Va. 

Sullivan, James — Age 38 years. Enlisted August 27. 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; promoted sergeant October i, 1864; mustered out 
with detachment June 5, 1865, near Alexandria, Va. 

Van Aram, Charles E. — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, 
at Schenectady to serve one year ; mustered in as private Co. H, 
September 3, 1864; captured in action October 30, 1864, at Peters- 
burg, Va. ; died January 28, 1865, at Salisbury, N. C. ; also borne as 
Charles Van Arum and Van Aurm. 

Walker, James — Age 16 years. Enlisted August 27, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve two years; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; absent without leave at muster out of company. 

Whitman, John A. — Age 17 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year; mustered in as private Co. D, August 29, 1864; 
mustered out June 5, 1865, at Alexandria, Va. ; also borne as Witman. 

Wilcox, George W. — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 26, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year ; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; wounded March 25, 1865 ; mustered out with detach- 
ment June 29, 1865, at Whitehall Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. ; also 
borne as George H. 

Williams, James — Age 21 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. H, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; absent without leave, at muster out of company. 

Williams, Robert T.^Age 44 years. Enlisted August 27, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment to date June 5, 1865, 
near Alexandria, Va. ; also borne as Robert S. 

Wise, George — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 27, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; promoted sergeant, no date; returned to ranks Feb- 
ruary 8, 1865; wounded in action March 25, 1865, at Fort Stedman, 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR 



33^ 



Va. ; died of his wounds, April 4, 1865, at Armory Square Hospital, 
Washington, D. C. 

Worden, Theodore — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. H, 
September 3, 1864; wounded in action April 5, 1865, near Petersburg, 
Va. ; mustered out August 8, 1865, at Douglas Hospital, Washington, 
D. C. ; also borne as Wordon. 

Wright, George H. — Age 19 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. E, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 5, 1865, near 
Alexandria, Va. 

EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT OF INFANTRY. 
New York State Rifles; Riflemen. 

This regiment, Col. William A. Jackson, was accepted by the 
state and received its numerical designation May 13th, 1861 ; 
organized at Albany, and there mustered in the service of the 
United States for two years May 17th, 1861. May nth, 1863, the 
three years' men of the regiment were transferred to the 121st N. Y. 
Vols. 

The companies were recruited principally : A and E at Schenec- 
tady ; B, F, H and I at Albany and immediate vicinity ; . C at Fish- 
kill ; D (Walkill Guards) at Middletown and in Sullivan county ; 
G at Canandaigua, and K at Ogdensburgh. 

The regiment left the state June 19th, 1861 ; served at Washing- 
ton, D. C, from June 21st, 1861 ; in Second Brigade, Fifth Division, 
Army N. E., Va., from July 13th, 1861 ; in Franklin's Brigade, 
Division of Potomac, from August 4th, 1861 ; in Newton's Brigade, 
Franklin's Division, A. P., from October 15th, 1861 ; in Third Bri- 
gade, First Division, First Corps, A. P., from March 13th, 1862 ; in 
the Third Brigade, First Division, Sixth Corps, A. P., from May, 
1862, and commanded by Colonel George R. Myers, was honorably 
discharged and mustered out at Albany May 28th, 1863. 

During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 3 
officers, 28 enlisted men ; of wounds received in action, i officer, 7 



1,2,2 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

enlisted men ; of disease and other causes, i officer, 35 enlisted men ; 
total, 5 officers, 70 enlisted men ; aggregate, 75 ; of whom 3 enlisted 
men died in the hands of the enemy ; and it took part in the follow- 
ing engagements, etc.: Braddock Road, Va., July 16; Fairfax Sta- 
tion, Va., July 17; Blackburn's Ford, Va., July 18; Bull Run, Va., 
Jiily 21 ; Munson's Hill, Va., August 28 and November 16 ; Spring- 
field Station, Va., December 4, 1861 ; Union Mills, Va., March 12; 
West Point, Va., May 7 ; Seven Days' Battle, Va., June 25 to July 
2 ; Burke's Station, Va., August 28 ; Crampton Pass, Md., Septem- 
ber 14; Antietam, Md., September 17; Fredericksburg, Va., Decem- 
ber 11-15, 1862; Franklin's Crossing, Va, April 29 to May 2; 
Marye's Heights and Salem Church, Va., May 3-4, 1863. 

Acker, Justice H — Age 20 years. Enlisted March 17, 1862, at Port 
Jervis; mustered in as private Co. B, same date to serve unexpired 
term of two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at 
Albany, N. Y. 

Acker, Musenon S.— Age 21 years. Enlisted May 2, 186 1, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; transferred to the Regular Army, date not stated. 

Ainsworth, James — Age 23 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, i86r, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Ames, John T. — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 22, 186 1, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Anthony, William J. — Age 22 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, i86i, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Arretts, Marcus W. — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted corporal October 11, 1861 ; sergeant September 
23, 1862; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., 
as Marquis W. Ahreets. 

Ball, James M. — Age 23 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as sergeant Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 333 

Barhydt, Andrew D. — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as corporal Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; reduced, date not stated; mustered out with company 
May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Barhydt, Dallas — Age 18 years. Enlisted May 2, 186 1, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out June 30, 1863, as Dallas G. Barhydt. 

Barringer, George C. — Age years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 

Schenectady ; mustered in as private Co. E, no date, to serve two 
years; no further record. 

Barrup, Andrew C. — Age 22 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as sergeant Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; reduced to ranks October i, 1861; transferred to Co. C, 
July 2, 1862; mustered in as second lieutenant December 7, 1862; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; com- 
missioned second lieutenant, November 10, 1862, with rank from 
July 22, 1862, vice Holden, resigned. 

Bell, Gleason — Age 20 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
died of disease December 8, 1862, in Stafford County, Va. 

Bink, Philip — Age 20 years. Enlisted April 25, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Bink, Wilhelmus — Age 18 years. Enlisted April 25, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. 
Y., as Wilhelmus L. Bink; subsequent service in Co. B, Second 
Veteran Cavalry. 

Birdsell, Peter— Age 21 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, date not stated, to serve two 
yeas ; no further record. 

Bogardus, Joseph E. — Age 24 years. Enlisted May 2, i86r, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861; to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Bovee, John N. — Age 18 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, i86r, to serve two years; 
wounded June 27, 1862, at Gaines Mills, Va. ; discharged September 
15, 1862. 



334 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Brothers, James H. — A^e 22 j^ears. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Bunton, Edward — Age 20 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted corporal November i, 1861; mustered out with 
company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Cary, Edmond — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schenec. 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May, 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out wuth company May 28, 1863, at Albany. N. Y., as 
Edward Cavey. 

Chase, John F. — Age 30 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, in Co. E, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; discharged for disability, July 8, 1861, at Washington, D. C. 

Christance, Francis — Age 27 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as corporal Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; reduced, date not stated; mustered out with company May 
28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Colby, Malan E. — Age 25 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
sent to insane asylum at Washington, D. C, February 13, 1863; no 
further record. 

Collins, Michael — Age 20 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as corporal Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; discharged for disability November 23, 1861, at Alexan- 
dria, Va. 

Conant, Gideon — Age 28 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Conway, Patrick — Age 18 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, ^t Albany, N. Y. ; subse- 
quent service in Co. D, Sixteenth Artillery. 

Cooley, William A. — Age 22 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May-17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Corrnie, Dennis — Age :^:^ years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 



335 



tady; mustered in as private Co. E, no date, to serve two years; no 
further record. 

Courtney, Robert — Age i8 years. Enlisted May 17, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, same date, to serve two 
years; wounded June 27, 1862, at Gaines Mills, Va. ; discharged 
October 9, 1862, by reason of such wounds, from hospital at Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

Crombie, Alexander M. — Age 27 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Dailey, John — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; also 
borne as John Daley. 

Daley, Daniel — Age 21 years. Enrolled April 22, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as first lieutenant Co. A, May 17, i86i, to serve 
two years; promoted captain December 9, 1862; resigned, February 
26, 1863, on account of wounds; commissioned first lieutenant July 4, 

1861, with rank from April 22, 1861, original; captain November 10, 

1862, with rank from August 14, 1862, vice Gridley, promoted. 
Dillon, John — Age 23 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subse- 
quent service in Fourth Artillery. 

Dolan, John — Age 32 years. Enlisted April 28, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subse- 
quent service in Co. E, Third Infantry. 

Douglass, Hugh — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 186 1, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Fagan, Thomas — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Failing, Andrew R. — Age 20 years. Enlisted April 28, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as sergeant Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 



33< 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Gale, John H. — Age 28 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
accidentally shot near Washington, D. C. ; died June 28, 1861. 

Geary, Thomas — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albanj^, N. Y. ; subse- 
quent service in Sixteenth Artillery. 

Getman, Albert — Age 22 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Geywinto, Byron — Age 22 years. Enlisted April 28, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as corporal Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted sergeant, date not stated; mustered out with 
company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., as Byron Gewint. 

Gill, Lawrence R. — Age 23 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as sergeant Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted first sergeant November i, 1862; mustered out 
with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Gregory, Orville — Age 21 j^ears. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; wounded June 27, 1862, at Gaines Mills, Va. ; mustered 
out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subsequent ser- 
vice in Sixteenth Artillery. 

Gridley, Joseph — Age 18 years. Enlisted May i, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady ; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; promoted corporal September i, 1861 ; mustered out with 
company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Gridley, Nathaniel P. Y. — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; killed June 27, 1862, at Gaines Mills, Va. 

Gridley, William S. — Age 22 years. Enrolled April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as captain Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; major August 14, 1862; mustered out with regiment May 
28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; commissioned captain July 4, 1861, with 
rank from April 22, 1861, original; major October 11, 1862, with rank 
from August 14, 1862, vice Maginnis, promoted. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 337 

Griepe, Harmon — Age 23 years. Enlisted April 29, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; died of heart disease, June 30, 1862, at Savage Station, Va. 

Groot, Edv^ard W. — Age 19 years. Enrolled April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as second lieutenant Co. A, May 17, 1861, 
to serve two years; discharged for disability, December 14, 1861; 
commissioned second lieutenant July 4, 1861, with rank from April 
22, 1861. original. 

Harman, Guilford D. — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Harrington, Able J. — Age 28 years. Enlisted May 2, 2861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, at Albany, N. Y. 

Harris, William H. — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted coproral, date not stated ; captured June 27, 1862, 
at Gaines Mills, Va. ; paroled, date not stated; mustered out January 
28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Hart, John — Age 30 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private ('o. A, May 17, 1 861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Hawley, Edmond B. — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 22, i86r, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as musician Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; reduced, date not stated; killed in action September 14, 
1862, at Crampton's Pass, Md. 

Hoffman, George — Age 21 years. Enlisted May 2, 1891, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861,^ to serve two 
years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; 
subsequent service in Co. F, Thirteenth Artillery. 

Holt, Anton— Age ^3 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at Albany; 
mustered in as private Co. H, same date, to serve two years; killed 
in action June 27, 1862, at Gaines Mills, Va. 

Horsefall, William — Age — years. Enrolled May 2, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as first lieutenant Co. E, May 17, 1861; to serve 
two years; captain December 27, 1861; killed September 14, 1862, at 
Crampton's Pass, Md. ; commissioned first lieutenant July 4, 1861, 
with rank from May 2, 1861, original; captain January 3, 1862, with 
rank from December 27, 1861, vice Truax, promoted. 



338 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Hour, Michael — Age 38 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; discharged for disability April 27, 1862, at Alexandria, Va. 

Howd, Samuel — Age 24 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1S91, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subse- 
quent service in Co. E, Sixteenth Artillery. 

Hungerford, Charles — Age 20 years. Enlisted April 26, 186 1, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Jenner, John — Age 30 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
musteredout with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 
■ Kalfels, Joseph — Age 39 years. Enlisted April 23, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; discharged for disability November 23, 186 1, at Alexan- 
dria, Va. 

Kane, John — Age 26 years. Enlisted April 28, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, i86r, to serve two years; 
discharged for disability September 24, 1861, at Alexandria, Va. 

Knox, Valentine — Age 22 years. Enlisted April 29, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Lamars, Barney — Age 26 years. Enlisted April 23, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; absent, sick in hospital since August 12, 1862, and at mus- 
ter out of company. 

La Que. John — Age 20 years. Enlisted May i, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

La Rew, Samuel — Age 26 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y., as Samuel La Rue; subsequent service in Co. B, Second 
Veteran Cavalry. 

Leverson, Henry — Age 18 years. Enlisted April 29, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 339 

two years; discharged May 19, 1861, by writ of habeas corpus as 
Henry Levison. 

Logan, James — Age 26 years. Enlisted April 25. 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albanj', N. Y. 

Lovett, Isaac C. — Age 23 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Manley, Michael — Age 38 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as musician Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; no further record. 

Marcellus, George H. — Age t,^ years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; no further record. 

Marlett, Giles — Age 20 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years, 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Maxwell, Legrant — Age 25 years. Enlisted April 28, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, r86i, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company, May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. ; subsequent service in Co. E, Second Veteran Cavalry. 

Mayher, Jeremiah — Age 26 years. Enlinted May 2, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; 
subsec|uent service in Co. B, Second Veteran Cavalry, as Jerry Mahar. 

McCann, John — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

McCarty, James — Age 30 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; mustered out June 2, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

McCormick, Thomas — Age 25 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as paivate Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

McGraw, Edward D. — Age 25 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 



340 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY, 

McKinney, Patrick — Age 28 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

McKinney, William H. — Age 20 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. ; subsequent service in Co. D, Sixteenth Artillery. 

McNeal, John — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; musi-ered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
discharged March 10, 1863, near Falmouth, Va. 

McNeil, James — Age 22 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
promoted corporal August 12, 1862; mustered out with company May 
28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Meyers, Robert — Age 21 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Miller, Robert J. — Age 24 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted sergeant, to date, May 17, 1861; mustered out 
with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Mitchell, A. Barclay — Age 20 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as musician Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; first lieutenant Co. C, June 16, 1861; captain October 19, 
1861; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; 
commissioned first lieutenant July 4, 1861, with rank from June 14, 
i86i, original; captain November 15, 1861, with rank from October 
19, 1861, vice Wiltsie, dismissed. 

Mooney, Frank — Age 23 years. Enlisted April 22, i86i, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subse- 
quent service in Co. E, Second Veteran Cavalry. 

Myers, Augustus — Age 25 years. Enlisted April 28, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted corporal December i, 186 1; mustered out with 
company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., as August Myers. 

O'Brien, Patrick — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR 



341 



two years; promoted corporal December i, 1861; mustered out with 
company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., as Patrick O'Bryan; subse- 
quent service in Co. C, Fourteenth Artillery. 

O'Connell, James — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; mustered out June 2, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

O'Leary, Michael — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 186 r, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y., as Michael O Larney. 

Otis, James — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenectady; 
mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; mus- 
tered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Perry, Frank — Age 19 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; 
subsequent service in Co. B, Second Veteran Cavalry. 

Peters, Christopher — Age 21 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; discharged for disability November 23, 1861. 

Pexman, Augustus — Age 25 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y., as August Pexman. 

Pillings. Charles — Age years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 

Schenectady; mustered in as musician Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years ; no further record. 

Pollard, John H. — Age 18 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Pryme, James — Age i8 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; no further record. 

Putman, John — Age 18 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
wounded, date and place not stated; discharged on account of such 
wounds August 15, 1862, from hospital at Washington, D. C. 

23 



342 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Read, David F. — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., as David 
F. Reed. 

Reed, William H. — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, i86r, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Riley, Samuel G. — Age 20 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted corporal December 10, 1861; mustered out with 
company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., as Simon G. Reiley. 

Roach, James — Age 20 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
promoted corporal September 20, 1862; mustered out with company 
May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subsequent service in Co. F, Thir- 
teenth Artillery. 

Rothenbiller, Joseph — Age 25 years. Enlisted April 26, 186 r, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; discharged for disability September 24, 1861, at Alexan- 
dria, Va. 

Rust, Elisha C. — Age 22 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1 861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subse- 
quent service Co. C, Sixteenth Artillery, as Elisha C. Rush. 

Schermerhorn, Ernott — Age 23 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as first sergeant Co. E, May 17, 1861, to 
serve two years; promoted sergeant-major November 14, 1861; mus- 
tered in as second lieutenant December 27, 1861; first lieutenant and 
adjutant to date, August 2. 1S62; mustered out with company May 
28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; commissioned second lieutenant Januar}'- 
3, 1862, with rank from December 27, 1861, vice Vedder, promoted; 
adjutant November 10, 1862, with rank from August i, 1862, vice J. 
H. Russell, deceased. 

Schermerhorn, Henry — Age 25 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as corporal Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; reduced, date not stated; mustered out with company 
May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subsequent service in Co. B, Second 
Veteran Cavalry. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 



343 



Schremph, John — Age 22 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
reported at muster out of company as having been sent to Alexan- 
dria Hospital April 7, 1862. 

Schutter, Lewis — Age 20 years. Enlisted May 15, i86t, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Schwantner, John — Age 34 years. Enlisted April 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; wounded, date not stated; discharged December 24, 1S62, 
near Falmouth, Va. , on account of wounds. 

Scotland, Robert — Age 31 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861. at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. ; subsequent service in Twenty-first Cavalry. 

Scully, John — Age 32 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, i86r, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; subse- 
quent service in Fourth and Thirteenth Artillery. 

Seymour, Frank^ — Age 20 years. Enlisted May 2, 186 1, at Schenec- 
tady; inustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
promoted corporal to date, May 17, 1861; sergeant, July 15, 1862; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Shannon, George — Age 18 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; discharged May 21, 1861, at Albany, N. Y., by writ of 
habeas corpus. 

Skelly, Edward S. — Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenectady; mus- 
tered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; mustered 
out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Soloman, Peter — Age 43 years. Enlisted April 28, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
promoted musician, date not stated; mustered out with company May 
28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Stall, Henry B. — Age years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 

Schenectady; mustered in as sergeant Co. A, May 17, i86r, to serve 
two years; promoted sergeant-major January 6, 1862; mustered out 
June 8, 1863. 



344 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Stanton, William H. — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 22, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17. 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. ; subsequent service in Thirteenth Artillery. 

Strunk, Joseph — Age ip-years. Enlisted April 22, 1861. at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as sergeant Co. A, May 17, 1 861, to serve two 
years; promoted first sergeant and mustered in as second lieutenant, 
dates not stated; discharged August 24, 1863; commissioned second 
lieutenant November 10, 1862, with rank from August 14, 1862, vice 
Munger promoted. 

Sutter, Charles — Age 38 years. Enlisted September 15, 1862, at 
S'chenectad}^; mustered in as private unassigned, same date, to serve 
three years; no further record. 

Tailing, Andrew R. — Age 20 years. Enlisted April 28, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as sergeant Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; no* further record. 

Thomas, Charles — Age 18 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Truax, Alfred — Age 30 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as sergeant Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two 
years; promoted first sergeant November 14, 1861; mustered in as 
first lieutenant September 20, 1862; mustered out wnth company May 
28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; commissioned first lieutenant December 
15, 1862, with rank from September 20, 1862, vice Vedder, resigned. 

Truax, Stephen — Age years. Enrolled May 2, 1861, at 

Schenectady; mustered in as captain Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; resigned December 27, 186 1; commissioned captain July 
4, i86r, with rank from May 2, 1861, original. 

Underbill, Franklin — Age 18 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; discharged for disability March 28, 1863, at White Oak 
Church, Va. 

Underbill, James — Age 23 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, i86i, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Van Voast, Walter— Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady, as private Co. E, to serve two years; no further record. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 345 

Van Vranken, Eleazer — Age 23 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, t86i, to serve 
two years; discharged for disability September 26, i86r, at Camp 
King, Alexandria, Va. 

Van Wee, Levi — Age 41 years. Enlisted May 3, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1861, at Albany, 
N. Y. ; subsequent service in Co. D, Thirteenth Artillery. 

Vedder, Barney M. — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; no further record. 

Vedder, John — Age years. Enrolled May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as second lieutenant Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; first lieutenant December 27, 1861; captain September 
20, 1862; mustered out with company May 28, 1863. at Albany, N. Y. ; 
commissioned second lieutenant July 4, 1861, with rank from May 2, 

1861, original; first lieutenant January 3, 1862, with rank from De- 
cember 27, 1 86 1, vice Horse fall promoted; captain December 15, 

1862, with rank from September 20, 1862, vice Horsefall killed in 
action. 

Vedder, Rodney S. — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted commissary-sergeant November i, 1861; mus- 
tered in as second lieutenant Co. H, June 27, 1862; detailed as quar- 
termaster December 9, 1862; mustered out with company May 28, 

1863, at Albany, N. Y. ; commissioned second lieutenant November 
10, 1862, with rank from July 16, 1862, vice Lane promoted. 

Vosburgh, Charles — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28. 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Wallace, Alexander — Age 21 years. Enlisted April 29, i86r, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, May 17, 1 861, to serve 
two years; discharged on account of accidental gunshot wounds 
January 2, 1862. 

Walley, Charles C. — Age 20 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; promoted corporal October 11, 1861, sergeant November 



346 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

14, 1861; first serg-eant September 20, 1862; mustered out with com- 
pany May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 

Weatherwax, Walter — Age 19 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E. May 17, 1861, to serve 
two years; mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, 
N. Y. 

Whitbeck, Abram — Age 24 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, date not stated, to serve 
two years; no further record. 

Wille, Frederick — Age 23 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y., as 
Frederick Wiley. 

Williams, John — Age 22 years. Enlisted May 2, 1861, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. E, May 17, 1861, to serve two years; 
mustered out with company May 28, 1863, at Albany, N. Y. 



ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTY-FOURTH REGIMENT 
OF INFANTRY. 

The Hon. George E. Danforth received authority, July 19th, 1862, 
to recruit this regiment in the counties of Delav^are, Schenectady 
and Schoharie. It was organized at Schoharie and there mustered 
in the service of the United States for three years, September 2 2d 
and 23d, 1862. June 5th, 1865, the men not to be mustered out 
with the regiment were transferred to the io2d N. Y. Vols. 

-The companies were recruited principally : A, B and F at Schenec- 
tady ; C and K at Schoharie ; D at Middleburgh, Fulton and 
Broome ; E at Blenheim, Gilboa, Broome, Jefferson, Conesville and 
Summit ; G at Cobleskill, Richmondville, Sharon, Seward and 
Gilboa ; H at Schenectady and Duanesburgh ; I at Schenectady, 
Fulton, Conesville, Wright, Broome, Duanesburgh, Gilboa, Middle- 
burgh and Glen. 

The regiment left the state under the command of Lieutenant- 
Colonel J. S. DeAgreda, September 25, 1862. It served in the 
Second Brigade, Second Division, Eleventh Corps, from October, 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 347 

1862 ; in the First Brigade, Second Division, Eleventh Corps, from 
May, 1863 ; on detached service at Alexandria, Va., in August, 1863 ; 
in Second Brigade, Second Division, Twentieth Corps, from April, 

1864, 'iiicl, commanded by Colonel Allan H. Jackson, it was honora- 
bly discharged and mustered out June 10, 1865, ^^ Bladensburgh, 
Md. During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 
4 officers, 59 enlisted men ; of wounds received in action, i officer, 
25 enlisted men ; of disease and other causes 3 officers, 91 enlisted 
men;' total, 8 officers, 175 enlisted men; aggregate, 183; of whom 
19 enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy ; and it took part in 
the following engagements, etc. : Chancellorsville, Va.; Gettysburg, 
Pa.; Hagerstow^n, Md.; Wauhatchie, Tenn.; Chattanooga and Ross- 
ville, Tenn.; Missionary Ridge ; Atlanta, Ga.; Rocky Faced Ridge, 
Resaca, Dallas, Kenesaw Mountain, Pine Mountain, Golgotha, Culp's 
Farm, The Assault, Marietta, Chattahoochie River, Peachtree Cross- 
ing, Peachtree Creek, Sandersville, near Greensboro, Monteich 
Swamp, Savannah, Campaign of the Carolinas ; Robertsville, S. C; 
Lexington Cross Roads, S. C; Aversboro, N. C; Benton ville, N. C; 
Smithfield, N. C; Raleigh, N. C; Bennett House, N. C. 

IN THE FIELD AND STAFF. 

Allan Jackson, lieutenant-colonel, March 10, 1863, Hope Landing, 
Va. ; appointed lieutenant Seventh Regiment, U. S. A. ; promoted to 
captain and major; retired. 

Henry Ramsey, Jr. — R. Q. M., August 6, 1864. in the field, Md. 

Henry Palmer — Adjutant, June i, 1865, New Bladensburg, Md. 

William H. Hoag — Surgeon, February 17, 1864, Lookout Valley, 
Tenn. ; resigned November 4, 1864. 

Edward W. Groot — Adjutant, July 28, 1862, Albany, N. Y. ; 
resigned April 8, 1863. 

Andrew Carney— R. Q. M., July 28, 1862, Albany, N. Y. 

All above, unless otherwise mentioned, were discharged June 10, 

1865, near Bladensburg, Md. 

NON-COMMISSIONED STAFF. 

George O. Van Eps — Sergeant-major. Enlisted at Schenectady 
August 6, 1862; wounded in action at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 



348 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Benjamin F. Sheldon— Serg-eant-major. Enlisted at Schenectady 
Angiist 6, 1862. 

Henry Ramsey, Jr. — Q. M. Sergeant. Enlisted at Schenectady 
August I, 1862. 

Henry Palmer — Q. M. Sergeant. Enlisted at Schenectady August 
26, 1862. 

Erwin W. Bowen — Sergeant-major. Enlisted at Schenectady 
August 20, 1862. 

All the above were discharged June 10, 1865, near Bladensburg, 
Md. 

COMPANY A. 

Benjamin F. Sheldon — Captain; commissioned August 7, 1862; 
discharged with regiment. 

James D. Scott — First lieutenant; commissioned Augusts, 1^62 ; 
discharged with regiment. 

William W. Moon — First sergeant; enlisted August 7, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Andrew W. Kelly— Second sergeant; enlisted August 7, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. In Rebel prison. 

Joseph McGraw — Third sergeant; enlisted August 6, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. In Rebel prison. 

George Tiffany— Fifth sergeant; enlisted August 9, 1892; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Isaac McGraw — Fourth sergeant; enlisted August 4, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Alonzo Gage — Corporal; enlisted August 11, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

George Ostrander — Corporal; enlisted August 25, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Alsdorf, Morgan — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Arnold, Peter J.— Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Clute, Nicholas M. — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; discharged 
with regiinent. 

Chapman, George H.— Enlisted as private August 8, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 349 

Dunbar, Friend H. — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Heinamen, Charles H. — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Horsfall, Garret — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Polch, Henry — Enlisted as private Augu.st 10, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Rumens, Charles — Enlisted as private July 24, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Spangle, Joseph — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Simpson, Thomas — Enlisted as private August 8, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Scheich, Andrew — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Van Aernam, Park W. — Enlisted as private August i, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Ward, James H. — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

West, John W. — Enlisted as private Augusts, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Kittle, James E. — Enlisted as corporal August i, 1862; no dis- 
charge given. 

Bond, Walter D. — Enlisted as corporal August 12, 1862; wounded; 
in hospital, Albany, N. Y. 

Auer, Frederick — Enlisted as private August 9, 1862; no discharge 
given. 

Beebe, Calvin H. — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; no dis- 
charge given. 

Brown, Richard — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; no discharge 
given. 

Clute, Nicholas — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; no discharge 
given. 

Ernest, Phillips L. — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862 ; no dis- 
charge given ; captured by the enemy. 

Eshardt, Frederick L. — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862; no 
discharge given ; wounded. 



35° 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Gag-e, Hiram J. — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862; no discharge 
given; wounded. 

Gage, Wesson — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862; no discharge 
given. 

Heddin, Herbert — Enlisted as private August 4, 1862; no discharge 
given. 

Hinly, Thomas — Enlisted as private August 11, 1862; no discharge 
given. 

McMarvin, William J. — Enlisted as private August 2, 1862; no 
discharge given. 

McCann, James — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; wounded at 
Annapolis, Md. No discharge given. 

Marcellus, Nicholas — Enlisted as private August 5, 1862; no dis- 
charge given. 

Marshall, Thomas — ^Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; no dis- 
charge given. 

Newman, Henry — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; captured 
by the enemy August 12, 1864. 

Osborne, George C. — Enlisted as private July 24, 1862; no dis- 
charge given. 

Rickerman, Anton — Enlisted as private August 11,' 1862; no dis- 
charge given. 

TuUock, John K. — Enlisted as private August 11, 1862; captured 
by the enemy. 

Tullock, James A. — Enlisted as private August 11, 1862; no dis- 
charge given. 

Van Dyck, Cornelius — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; 
wounded ; no discharge given. 

Watkins, James M. — Commissioned as captain August 12, 1862; 
resigned February, 1863. 

Bradt, Henry Y. — Commissioned as first lieutenant August 11, 
1862; resigned February, 1863. 

Turnbull, George A. — Commissioned captain August 30, 1862; 
resigned February 3, 1864. 

Armstrong, James — Enlisted as private August 13, 1862; discharged 
for disability in 1864. 

Barringer, Jacob— Enlisted as private Augusts, 1862; discharged 
for disability December, 1862. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 351 

Babcock, William — Enlisted as private August i, 1862; discharged 
for disability April, 1863. 

Bradt, John — Enlisted as private August 9, 1862; discharged for 
disability 1863. 

Cain, Isaac — Enlisted as private August i, 1862; discharged for 
disability January, 1863. 

Dean, William H. — Enlisted as corporal August ir, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability April 16, 1863. 

Kimble, Castleton E. — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability December, 1863. 

Montaney, William J. — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; dis- 
charged for insanity in 1863. 

McDonald, Hiram C. — Enlisted as private July 29, 1862; discharged 
for disability. 

Nichols, Nelson — Enlisted as private July 29, 1862; discharged for 
disability. 

Nichlas, George — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; discharged 
for disability. 

Switts, John H. — Enlisted as private August 14, 1862; discharged 
for disability. 

Shauber, Hubert A. — Enlisted as private August 9, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability. 

Wohmleich, Christian — Enlisted as private Augusts, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability. 

Zubler, Rudolph— Enlisted as private August i, 1862; discharged 
for disability. 

Palmer, Henry I. — Commissioned second lieutenant August 9, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Bishop, George W. — Commissioned second lieutenant August 4, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Ramsay, Henry — Commissioned first lieutenant August i, 1862; 
discharged with regiment. 

Brothers, John — Enlisted as private August 21, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Barber, James — Enlisted as private August 8, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Cain, William H. — Enlisted as private July 31, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 



352 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Clute, Christian H. — Enlisted as private August 9, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Claapman, Lionel — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862 ; discharged 
with regiment. 

Dillon, Horatio P. — Enlisted as private August 9, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Deifendahl, Gerard — Enlisted as private August 10, 1862 ; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Green, Aaron — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Heddin, Oliver — Enlisted as private August 13, 1862 ; discharged 
with regiment. 

King, Henry — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; discharged with 
regiment. 

Marhell, Herbert — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862. 

Osing, Andrew — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Reynold, Asa — Enlisted as private August 4, 1862; discharged with 
regiment. 

Rosenkrans, Charles — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Shape, Joseph L. — Enlisted as sergeant August 7, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Stevens, George E. — Enlisted as private July 22, 1862 ; discharged 
with regiment. 

Beer, George H. — Enlisted as corporal August 6, 1862 ; discharged 
with regiment. 

Van Voast, Andrew — Enlisted as private August 11, 1862; lost a 
leg ; discharged with regiment. 

Van Benscoten, Jerome — Enlisted as private August 5, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Youndley, Caleb W. — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Peasley, George A. — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862 ; discharged 
with regiment. 

Becker, John B.— Enlisted as private July 30, 1862 ; killed in action 
at Gettysburg, July i, 1863. 

Chapan, George — Enlisted as private August 8, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 353 

Heibner, William — Enlisted as private August 15, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Kittle, Solomon — Enlisted as corporal August 7, 1862; killed in 
action at Chatahoochie River July 14, 1864. 

Palmer, Peter S. — Enlisted as corporal August 7, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg July i, 1863. • 

Tooles, John A. — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Tooles, Cicero — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; killed in action 
at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Bice, Benjamin B. — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862; died from 
wounds at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Bohanna, Jacob V. V. — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; died 
in hospital at Annapolis, Md. 

Palmer, George W. — Enlisted as private August 17, 1862; died July 
19, 1864, from wounds received in action. 

Robinson, Franklin — Enlisted as sergeant July 30, 1862; died in 
Rebel prison, Va. 

Smith, Frederick — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; died July 
19, 1863, from wounds received at Gettysburg. 

Welber, Silas — Enlisted as private August 7,] 1862; died June 23, 
1863, at Columbia hospital. 

COMPANY B. 

Smith, Daniel — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, September 29, 
1862; discharged for disability at lookout Valley, Tenn. 

Smith, Winfield S. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 
1862; discharged for disability at Washington, D. C. 

Stephens, Isaac — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August . 12, 
1862; discharged for disability at Washington, D. C. 

Sickler, Isaac — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 7, 1862; 
discharged for disability at Washington, D. C. 

Shankle, Henry — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, September 17, 
1862; discharged for disability at Washington, D. C. 

Teller, Frederick — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 8, 
1862; discharged for disability at Washington, D. C. 

Forrest, Thomas — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 25, 
1862; discharged at Albany. 



354 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Bethman, — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 23, 

1862; discharged with regiment. 

Carroll, John J. — Enlisted as sergeant at Schenectady, August 7, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Dean, Ira B. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 1862; 
discharged with regiment. 

Davenport, Soloman — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 

11, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Harbison, Robert — Enlisted at Schenectady, August 6, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Hall, John M. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 15, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Johnson, Benjamin — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 6, 
1S62 ; wounded at Gettysburg, July i, 1863. 

Lambert, David — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 25, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Moore, Ransom — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 23, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Martin, William — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 7, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Sheldon, Benjamin — Enlisted as private, August 6, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Van Epps, George O. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 
6, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Van Patten, Harmon — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 

12, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Van De Mark, L. V. K. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, 
August 6, 1862; discharged with regiment 

Wemple, Walter V. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 
28, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Wilkie, William G. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 
II, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Youngs, William G.— Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 

13, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Lyons, Samuel P. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 13, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Ashton, Geo.— Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 1862; 
killed in action at Rocky Face Ridge, Ga., May 8, 1864. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 355 

Cooper, Gabriel A. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 23, 
1862; killed in action at Rocky Face Ridge, Ga., May 8, 1864. 

Gelnn, P. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 7, 1862; 
killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Hawkins, Leroy— Enlisted at Schenectady, August 14, 1862; 
killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Livingston, James — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 
1862; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Mead, Lucino — -Enlisted as sergeant at Schenectady, August 12, 
1862; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Miles, Stephen A. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 5, 
1862; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Peak, Henry — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 12, 1862; 
killed at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Van Zandt, Abram K. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 
7, 1862; killed at Peachtree Creek, Ga., July 20, 1864. 

Rosa, Richard — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 6, 
1862; killed at Rocky Face Ridge, Ga., May 8, 1864. 

Wessel, Richard — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 9, 
1862; killed at Rocky Face Ridge, Ga., May 8, 1864. 

Aker, John — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 1862; 
died at Hospital, Fairfax, C. H., Va., October 26, 1862. 

Mead, Peter — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 12, 1862; 
died at Hospital, Fairfax, C. H., Va. October 22, 1862. 

Mailer, James R. — ^Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 6, 
1862; died at Andersonville, Ga. August 16, 1864, from wounds re- 
ceived in action at Peachtree Creek, Ga. July 26, 1864. 

Retiker, Cornelius — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 13, 
1862; wounded at Chattanooga, Tenn. July 29, 1864. 

Cramer, Abram — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

DeGraff, Joseph — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 14, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Deal, Edwin^Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 7, 1862; 
wounded July i, 1863. 

Bradt, Garret— Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 9, 1862; 
wounded in action July i, 1863. 

Hamlin, David H. — Captain; enlisted at Schenectady, August 19, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 



356 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Wilson, Soloman — Second Lieutenant; enlisted at Schenectady, 
August 19, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Robinson, Duncan — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 14, 

1862 ; wounded in action, July 20, 1864; in hospital at Nashville, Tenn. 
Barhydt, Cornelius — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 7, 

1862; wounded in action at Rocky Face Ridge, Ga., May 4, 1864; 
died in hospital at Nashville, Tenn. 

Van Epps, Harrison — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 
7, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Van Benthuysen, Groat — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, Aug. 
9, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Weston, Frederick — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 7, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Graff, Alexander— Enlisted as private at Schenectady, January 11, 
1864 ; discharged with regiment. 

Grant, John D. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, December 12, 

1863 ; discharged with regiment. 

Carr, Peter — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 1862; 
discharged with regiment. 

Graff, Gustavis — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 7, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Hopkins, George — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 14, 
1862 ; discharged with regiment. 

Kelly, John — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, September i, 
1864; discharged with regiment. 

Houston, William — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 18, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

. Hogan, Patrick — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 15, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Kelly, Edward — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Lee, Charles — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 1862; 
discharged with regiment. 

Markham, James — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 19, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Oliver, Abram A. — Enlisted" as private at Schenectady, August 26, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Pain, Thomas — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 22, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 



357 



Slover, Aaron — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 14, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Safford, Harry — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 13, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Truax, Christopher— Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 
13, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Medler, Thomas — Enlisted as first sergeant at Schenectady, August 

7, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Swart, John H. — Enlisted as second sergeant at Schenectady, 
August 12, 1862; discharged with reg-iment. 

Garrity, John B. — Enlisted as third sergeant at Schenectady. Aug. 

8, 1862,- discharged with regiment. 

Schermerhorn, John — Enlisted as fourth sergeant at Schenectady, 
August II, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Fisher, John H. — Enlisted as fifth sergeant at Schenectady, August 
II, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Harmon, Anthony — Enlisted as corporal at Schenectady, August 
15, 1862; discharged with regiment. 

Rector, William — Enlisted as corporal at Schenectady, August 11, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Rolf, Samuel — Enlisted as corporal at Schenectady, August 6, 
1862 ; discharged with regiment. 

Bradt, John H. — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 8, 
1862 ; discharged with regiment. 

Bradt, William — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 11, 
1862; discharged with regiment. 

Beverly, John — Enlisted as private, August 16, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Boakes, William— Enlisted as private, August 11, 1862 ; discharged 
with regiment. 

Brown, Henry — Enlisted as private, August 25, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Bailey, Jackson — Enlisted as private, August 11, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Benedict, Geo. W. — Enlisted as private, August 6, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Carr, Henry — Enlisted as private, August 8, 1862; discharged with 
regiment. 

24 



3s8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Dence, Joseph— Enlisted as private, August ii, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Dickens, Francis I. — Enlisted as private, August 6, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

De Graff, Jacob — Enlisted as private, August 27, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Darker, Ed. R. — Enlisted as private, August 9, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Frias, John — Enlisted as private, August 11, 1862; discharged with 
regiment. 

Fuller, Wm. W. — Enlisted as private, August 11, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Firie, James H. — Enlisted as private, August 13, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Jones, Morris E. — Enlisted as private, August 25, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Kirkpatrick, David — Enlisted as private, August 7, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

La Grange, John S. — Enlisted as private, August 13, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Marcellow, Corn. — Enlisted as private, September i, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Neal, Phineas — Enlisted as private, August 8, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Pier, Wm. — Enlisted as private, August 13, 1862; discharg.ed with 
regiment. 

Rolf, Geo. — Enlisted as private, August 17, 1862; discharged with 
regiment. 

Van Vranken, Aaron — Enlisted as private, August 6, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Brooks, Wm. H. — Enlisted as private, August 11, 1862; wounded 
in action, July i, 1863; discharged with regiment. 

Brewer, John — Enlisted as private, August 12, 1862; wounded in 
action, July i, 1863; discharged with regiment. 

Jassup, Joseph — Enlisted as private, August 14, 1862; wounded in 
action, July i, 1863; discharged with regiment. 

Loyal, Anthony — Enlisted as private, August 23, 1862; wounded in 
action, July i, 1863, discharged with regiment. 



SOLDIERvS OF CIVIL WAR. 359 

Mosher, Edwin — Enlisted as private, August 6, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

McCarty, Robt. — Enlisted as private, August 19, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Paige, Wm. — Enlisted as private, August 23, 1862; discharged with 
regiment. 

Rockwell, Wm. E. — Enlisted as private, August 12, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

McKinney, James — Enlisted as private, August 23, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Van Warmer, James — Enlisted as private, August 9, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

COMPANY F. 

Kennedy, John W. — Commissioned second lieutenant May 2, 1863; 
promoted from second sergeant to second lieutenant to date May 2, 
i860; discharged with regiment. 

Cramer, Henry P. — Enlisted as first sergeant, August 25, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

McMillan, Alexander G. — Enlisted as second sergeant, August 23, 
1862. 

Trager, August — Enlisted as third sergeant, August 23, 1862. 

Carroll, Benjamin — Enlisted as fourth sergeant, August 23, 1862. 

Howe, William H. — Enlisted as fifth sergeant, August 20, 1862. 

Millen, Thomas — Enlisted as first corporal, September 5, 1862; 
wounded in left knee at Gettysburg. 

Fair, Jacob — Enlisted as second corporal, August 29, 1862. 

Whitmyer, William — Enlisted as third corporal, August 29, 1862. 

Ketchum, George — Enlisted as fourth corporal, August 25, 1862. 

Seigney, Abram C. — Enlisted as fifth corporal, August 25, 1862. 

Brougham, Jacob — Enlisted as private, August 25, 1862; wounded 
in left arm at Pine Knoll, Ga., June, 1864. 

Chambers, Henry C. — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862. 

Doherty, James — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862. 

Depew, John — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862. 

Grupe, Dederick — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862. 

Osing, William H. — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862. 

Parker, John — Enlisted as private August 28, 1862. 

Penny, Martin — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862. 



36o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Plunkett, Pal — Enlisted as private September 7, 1864. 

Russ, Christopher — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862. 

Sacia, Abram — Enlisted as private August 20, 1862. 

Shannon, James — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862. 

Wood, James — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862. 

Winter, Judson — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862. 

Ward, Albert — Enlisted as private August 23, 1862. 

White, William — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; wounded in 
the head at Gettysburg, July i, 1S63. 

Weller, Columbus W. — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862. 

Bakeman, Christopher — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862 ; cap- 
tured by the enemy at Peachtree Creek. 

Brandwill, William — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; sick in 
hospital at David Island, at muster out of company. 

Cooper, Ed. M. — Enlisted as musician August 26, 1862 ; orderly at 
camp parole at Annapolis, at muster out of company. 

Farrell, John — Enlisted as corporal August 25, 1862; captured by 
the enemy December i, 1864; absent from muster. 

Hogan, Michael — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; sick in hos- 
pital at time of muster out of company. 

Plato, Frederick — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; captured by 
the enemy at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Teller, Campbell— ^Enlisted as corporal August 25, 1862; sick in 
hospital at David Island at muster out of company. 

Brelnk, Elias — Enlisted as private August 29, 1862 ; discharged for 
disability at Stafford Court House, January 12, 1863. 

Eckert, August — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; discharged 
for disability at Washington, D. C, February 16, 1863. 

Horstmyre, Frank C. — Enlisted as private August 25. 1862; dis- 
charged for disability at Washington, D. C, November 24, 1862. 

Gitzkona, Louis — Enlisted as private August 27, 1862; discharged 
for disability at Fort Schuyler September 26, 1863. 

Hoag, Chas. — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; discharged for 
disability at Lookout Valley, May 17, 1864. 

Hogan, Darius C. — Enlisted as private August 28, 1862; discharged 
for disability at Washington, D. C, August 14, 1863. 

Kennedy. John W. — Enlisted as sergeant August 20, 1862; pro- 
moted second lieutenant. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 361 

Lansing, Reuben — Enlisted as private August 28, 1862; discharged 
for disability. 

McClyman, Thos. — Enlisted as private August 28, 1862; discharged 
for disability at Alexandria, Va. , February 17, 1863. 

McKinney, Wm. W. — Enlisted as corporal August 27, 1S62; dis- 
charged for disability at Nashville, Tenn. 

Myers, James — Enlisted as private August 28, 1862 ; discharged for 
disability May 17, 1865. 

Peek, Joseph G.— Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; discharged 
for disability at Annapolis, May i, 1864. 

Plato, James — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; discharged for 
disability at Newark, N. J. 

Schermerhorh, Myndert — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability at Washington. D. C. 

Truax, Elias — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862 ; discharged for 
disability at Fort Schuyler, May 30, 1864. 

Vrooman, Jacob — Enlisted as sergeant August 23, 1862; discharged 
for disability at Washington. 

Ward, Myndert — Enlisted as private September 4, 1862; discharged 
for disability at Washington, May 14, 1863. 

Wilder, Hiram — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; discharged 
for disability at Bridgeport, Ala., May 30, 1864. 

Yates, H. V. — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; discharged for 
disability at Lookout Valley, March 30, 1864. 

Brown, Clinton C. — Enlisted as first lieutenant August 30, 1862; 
promoted and transferred to Co. E, afterwards Captain, Assistant 
Adjutant-General on Staff of General Bushbeck; afterwards com- 
missioned Lieutenant-Colonel. 

Turnbull, Geo. A. — Commissioned Captain August 30, 1862. 

Austin Henry — Enlisted as private August 25, 1863; transferred to 
Vetrean Reserve Corps. 

Bealtinger, Henry — Enlisted as private August 29, 1863; transferred 
to Veteran Reserve Corps, January i, 1865. 

Bentz, Christian — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; transferred 
to Co. K, September 23, 1862. 

Beaver, Peter — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; transferred to 
Co. K, September 23, 1862. 

Bohler, John J.— Enlisted as private August 20, 1862; transferred 
to Co. K, September 23, 1862. 



362 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Cornelius, David — Enlisted as private August 28; 1862; transferred 
to Co. K, September 28, 1862. 

Calkins, Henry C. — Enlisted as private August 23, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, February 11, 1864. 

Cramer, John M. — Enlisted as private August 27, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, March 3, 1864. 

Grim, John — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; transferred to 
Co. K, August 28, 1862. 

Hagadorn, James R. — Enlisted as private August 27, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 13, 1864. 

Heilderbrandt, Charles — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862 ; 
transferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, March 22, 1865. 

Stopper, John — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; transferred to 
Co. K, September 23, 1862. 

Snowden, William — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862 ; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 10, 1864. 

Slover, William — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; transferred 
to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 4, 1864. 

Van De Bogart, John W. — Enlisted as private August 22, 1862; 
transferred to Co. K, September 23, 1862. 

Wilsey, Theodore — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, May 15, 1864. 

Young, Addision M. — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, September 26, 1863. 

Young, Deodatus W.— Enlisted as private August 29, 1862; trans- 
ferred to Veteran Reserve Corps, January i, 1865. 

Damm. Wm. J. — Enlisted as corporal August 26, 1862; killed in 
charge of Kenesaw Mountain, Ga., June 27, 1864. 

Hyart, John — Enlisted as Private August 24. 1862; killed in action 
at Gettysburg, July i, 1863. 

Proper, David S. — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg, July i, 1863. 

Trask, Jacob — Enlisted as sergeant August 21, 1862; killed in action 
at Gettysburg, July i, 1863. 

Vanerman, Alonzo — Enlisted as corporal August 26, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg, July i, 1863. 

Kennedy, G. D. — Commissoned Major August 30, 1862; died in 
hospital at Philadelphia, September 22, 1863. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 363 

Bouman, John — Enlisted as private August 26, 1861; died in hos- 
pital at Lookout Mountain, August 20, 186 1. 

Trey, Geo. — Enlisted as private August 28, 1862 ; died at Fairfax 
Court House, Va., October 22, 1862. 

Alpin, John — Enlisted as private August 21, 1862; died in Ander- 
son ville Prison, Ga., October 17, 1864. 

Jones, Evan — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; died at Ander- 
sonville Prison, Ga., June 28, 1864. 

Robinson, Wm. O. — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; died at 
Andersonville Prison, June 23, 1864. 

Seaman, Steven — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; died at 
Emery Hospital, Washington, D. C, October 8, 1862. 

Schermerhorn, Jacob — Enlisted as private September 15, 1862; died 
at Carver Hospital, December 18, 1862. 

Swailes, Samuel — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; wounded 
in action at Gettysburg; died July 9, 1863. 

Gates, Andrew C— Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; died at 
Stafford Court House, Va., February 7, 1863. 

COMPANY H. 

Wood, Chas.— Enlisted as first sergeant August 13, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Rockwell, Jay — Enlisted as fourth sergeant August 30, 1862; dis- 
charged with company. 

Chilson, Loran — Enlisted as first corporal August 13, 1862; dis- 
charged with company. 

Page, Phineas — Enlisted as fourth corporal August 13, 1862; dis- 
charged with company. 

Moran, Wm. — Enlisted as fifth corporal September 3, 1862; dis- 
charged with company 

Brown, I. R.— Enlisted as sixth corporal August 9, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Brown, Edward P. — Enlisted as private August 9, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Gartner, Wm. — Enlisted as private August 16, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Campbell, Lewis — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; discharged 
with company. 



j^64 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

De Golyer, Arthur W.— Enlisted as private August 4, 1862; dis- 
charged with company. 

Filkins, Benjamin— Enlisted as private July 28, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Fields, Samuel S.— Enlisted as private August 13, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Fredericks, Elijah— Enlisted as private August 16, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Jones, John C— Enlisted as private August 18, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Johnson, Wm.-— Enlisted as private August 10, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Lester, Mordecai — Enlisted as private August 19, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Liddle, Thol. G. — Enlisted as private August 20, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Murphy, Jerry — Enlisted as private August 4, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Seaman, Robt. O. — Enlisted at private August 13, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Stebbins, John— Enlisted as private August 18, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Squires, George — Enlisted as private August 5, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Sherman, Bactus — Enlisted as private August 20, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Teller, Henry Y. — Enlisied as private August 13, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Volkman, John — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; discharged 
with company. 

Van Antewerp, Peter — Enlisted as private August 14, 1862; dis- 
charged with company. 

Buhler, Joseph — Enlisted as private March 20, 1865; recruit. 

Ackley, Ezra S.. — Enlisted as second sergeant August 22, 1862; 
wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1863; in hospital since at Balti- 
more, Md. 

Bradt, Geo. — Enlisted as third sergeant August 14, 1862; wounded 
at Savannah, Ga. , December 19, 1864; in hospital since at Savannah, 
Ga. ; discharged June 21, 1865, at Albany, N. Y. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 365 

Bennett, Geo.- — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; captured by- 
enemy at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863, 

Abies, John W. — Enlisted as p'rivate August 8, 1862; died in hos- 
pital at Nashville, Tenn. 

Bradt, Aaron — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; died in hos- 
pital at Nashville, Tenn. 

Burbank, H. H. — Enlisted as private August 9, 1862; wounded at 
Dug Gap, Ga., May 8, 1864; in hospital at Nashville; discharged June 
3, 1865, at Louisville, Ky. 

Hughes, David — Enlisted as private August 14, 1862; sick in hos- 
pital at Nashville, Tenn. 

Kennedy, James — Enlisted as private August 13, 1862; sick in hos- 
pital at Nashville, Tenn. 

Kohn, Lewis — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862; wounded at 
Dallas, Ga., May 28, 1864, and in hospital at Madison, Ind. 

Knight, Michael — Enlisted as private August 27, 1862; died in the 
hospital at Nashville, Tenn. 

Levy, William Thomas — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; 
wounded at Dug Gap, Ga., May 8, 1864; in hospital at Washington, 
D. C. 

Mesick, Henry G. — Enlisted as corporal August 13, 1862; dis- 
charged June 24, 1865, at Albany, N. Y. 

Mackey, William — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; captured 
by the enemy near Goldsboro, April 3, 1865; discharged June 23, 
1865, at New York City. 

Preston, Henry — Enlisted as third corporal August 7, 1862; died in 
hospital at Nashville, Tenn. 

Philo, Isaac M. — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; discharged 
May 31, 1865, at Albany, N. Y. 

Rockwell, Henry — Enlisted as private August 31, 1862; died in the 
hospital at Albany, N. Y. 

Sharp, Abram — Enlisted as private August 21, 1862; died in hos- 
pital at Nashville, Tenn. 

Tymeson, Peter — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; detached as 
clerk at Columbia Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Berry, Alden W. — Enlisted as sergeant August 1 1, 1862 ; discharged 
for disability December, 1862, at Washington, D. C. 

Carley, Gerardus — Commissioned as first lieutenant September 2, 
1862; discharged November, 1863. 



366 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Counlermine, Charles— Enlisted as private August i8, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability January 16, 1863, at Washington, D. C. 

Davis, Charles O.— Enlisted as private August 11, 1862 ; discharged 
for disability June 28, 1863, at Washington, D. C. 

Buesmaghlin, Peter — Enlisted as private July 23, 1862; discharged 
for disability December, 1862, at Washington, D. C. 

Kuyser, Theodore — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; discharged 
for disability November 11, 1862, at Washington, D. C. 

Lester, Alanson — Enlisted as private August 20, 1862; wounded; 
discharged for disability January 27, 1864, at New York. 

Lester, John — Enlisted as private August 24, 1862; discharged for 
disability January 27, 1864, at Washington, D. C. 

Herrick, Marcus A. — Enlisted as second lieutenant September 22, 
1862; discharged March 1863, at Hope Landing, Va. 

Myers, James — Enlisted as private August 19, 1862; discharged for 
disability January 16, 1863, at Washington, D. C. 

Mickler, Wm. H. — Enlisted as first sergeant September 2, 1862; 
discharged to receive promotion of first lieutenant of Co. I. 

Ouderkirk, Peter — Enlisted as private August i, 1862; discharged 
for disability January 2, 1862, at Fairfield. 

Rockwell, William E. — Enlisted as first sergeant September 3, 
1862; discharged to receive promotion of first lieutenant of Co. B. 

Tripp, Henry — Enlisted as private August 31, 1862; discharged for 
disability April 5, 1863, at Hope Landing, Va. 

Van Huysen, John — Enlisted as private August 24, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability September 7, 1863, at Alexandria, Va. 

Van Wormer, John — Enlisted as private August 22, 1862; dis. 
charged for disability January i, 1863, at Washington, D. C. 

Wasson, Andrew J. — Enlisted as private August 14, 1862; dis- 
charged for disability May 9, 1864, at York, Pa. 

Yates, Austin A. — Commissioned as captain September 22, 1862; 
discharged June 12, 1863. 

Acker, Adam — Enlisted as private August 15, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Bradt, Danice A. — Enlisted as private August 15, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Burk, James W. — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 367 

Breyner, Andrew — Enlisted as private August 24, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Burrows, Clarence D.— Enlisted as private September 6, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Burrows, Danice — Enlisted as private September 6, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Countermine, William — Enlisted as private August 22, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Earles, William — Enlisted as private August 24, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Mochrie, Edward J. — Enlisted as private August 5, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Pudley, William W. — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Palmer, Henry — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Smith, Barney S. — Enlisted as private August 22, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Truax, Peter — Enlisted as private August 13, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Barkhuff, James — Enlisted as private August 18, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Carl, Robert C. — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Chamberlain, Jesse — Enlisted as private August 16, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Frederick, Daniel — Enlisted as private August i, 1863; killed in 
action at Dug Gap, Ga., May 8, 1864. 

Miller, James — Enlisted as private August 13, 1862; killed in action 
at Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. , June 27, 1864. 

Regies, George — Enlisted as private August 13, 186.2; killed in 
action at Gettysburg, Pa., July i, 1863. 

Bradt, Oliver — Enlisted as sergeant August 25, 1862; died in hos- 
pital January 28, 1864. 

Dongal, John E. — Enlisted as private August 15, 1862; died in 
hospital July 11, 1863. 

Dongal, Robert E. — Enlisted as private August 22, 1862; died at 
hospital October 31, 1862. 



368 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Coton, Daniel — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; died in hos- 
pital July 10, 1863. 

Connell, John— Enlisted as private August 3, 1862; died in hospi- 
tal July 10, 1863. 

Myers, Henry — Enlisted 'as private August 29, 1862; died in hos- 
pital August II, 1863. 

Somes, Horatio — Enlisted as private August 20, 1862; died October 
30, 1862. 

COMPANY I. 

Gasser, Rudolph- — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, March 20, 
1865. 

Goodspeed, William — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, July 29, 
1862. 

Jener, Charles — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 29, 
1862. 

Connelly, Patrick — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 20, 
1862. 

Stock, Christian — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 15, 
1862; died in Brigade Hospital, Lookout Valley, Tenn., April, 1864. 

Brotherson, Stephen — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 
22, 1862. 

Laribee, Thomas — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 13, 
1862. 

Rooker, Ira — Enlisted as private at Schenectady, August 21, 1862. 

COMPANY K. 

Horn, Valentine — Enlisted as first sergeant August 27, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Burke, Simon — Enlisted as private August 15, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Bethman, Henry — Enlisted as private August 23, 1864; discharged 
with regiment. 

Blezer, Frank — Enlisted as private August 29, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Berbek, Conradt — Enlisted as private August 23, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Blum, Christian— Enlisted as private August 27, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 369 

Kunst, Frederick— Enlisted as private September 12, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Shuster,' Antone — Enlisted as private September 6, 1862 ; discharged 
with regiinent. 

Van De Bogart, George — Enlisted as private July 23, 1862; dis- 
charged with regiment. 

Worster, Philip — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Cramer, Adrian— Enlisted as private Angus!: 11, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Eisenminger, Ferdinand — Enlisted as musician January 6, 1864; 
discharged with regiment. 

Slover, Aaron — Enlisted as private August 14, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Ekenhoff, John C. — Enlisted as private August 15, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Grumm, John — Enlisted as private August 26, 1862; wounded in 
action at Gettysburg. 

Heddin, Oliver — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Herman, Phillip — Enlisted as private September 2, 1862; missing 
in action; returned. 

Keller, John — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; missing in 
action ; returned. 

Palmiteer, John — Enlisted as private August 30, 1862; captured by 
the enemy; paroled. 

Truax, Theodore — Enlisted as private August 4, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Van Able, John — Enlisted as private September 6, 1862; discharged 
with regiment. 

Wagner, John— Enlisted as private September 6, 1862 ; discharged 
with regiment. 

Henry, Frederick — Commissioned first lieutenant September 8, 
1862; resigned March 29, 1863. 

Burkhardt, Joseph — Commissioned second lieutenant September 
25, 1862; resigned June 15, 1863. 

Gutland, Charles — Commissioned second lieutenant April i, 1863; 
promoted first lieutenant from April i, 1863, and discharged a 
paroled prisoner. 



370 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Ball, Charles L. S. — Enlisted as second sergeant August ii, 1862; 
surgeon certified to wounds received in action. 

Newber, Frederick — Enlisted as second sergeant September 3, 
1862; wounded in action April 13, 1863. 

Baldus, Charles — Enlisted as corporal July 30, 1862; discharged 
January 21, 1865, for wounds received in action. 

Brickner, Andrew — Enlisted as private August 20, 1862; surgeon 
certified to disability. 

Brughaught, Jacob — Enlisted as private September 2, 1862; disa- 
bility. 

De Voe, Hiram — Enlisted as private September 22, 1862; dis- 
charged March 25, 1863, from hospital. 

Klutz, Chas. — Enlisted as private August 28, 1862; discharged 
September 25, 1863. 

Runze, Chas. — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; discharged 
May 18, 1865. 

Schnyder, Fred C. — Enlisted as private August 2, 1862; discharged 
from Field Hospital April 15, 1863. 

Schwartzman, Adam — Enlisted as private August 23, 1862; General 
Hospital January 22, 1864. 

Dandemark, L. V. K. — Enlisted as private August 6, 1862; hospital 
at Baltimore, Md., March 20, 1863. 

Bentz, Christian — Enlisted as first sergeant August 30, 1862; killed 
in action at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Bellinger, Jacob — Enlisted as private August 23, 1862; killed in 
action at Dug Gap, Va., March 8, 1864. 

Beaber, Peter — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Geiser, Jacob — Enlisted August 29, 1862; killed in action at 
Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Link, Peter — Enlisted as private September 5, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Martin, Wiilliam — Enlisted as private August 7, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg July i, 1863. 

Schelkoff, John — Enlisted as private August 25, 1862; killed in 
action at Gettysburg. 

Schmidt, Joseph— August 30, 1862; killed in action at Gettysburg 
July I, 1863. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR 371 

Stopper, John — Enlisted as private August 28, 1862; killed in action 
at Peachtree Creek, Ga. , July. 20, 1864. 

Eisemminger, Ferdinand — Enlisted as private; wounded in action 
at Resaca, Ga. ; died June 16, 1864. 

Genser, Ferdinand — Enlisted as private September 2, 1862; died of 
disease June 15, 1863. 

Osing, Andrew — Enlisted as private August 12, 1862; wounded in 
action at Resaca, Ga. ; died June 19, 1864. 

Reynolds, Asa — Enlisted as private August 4, 1862; died of disease 
at Fairfax Court House December 6, 1862. 



SEVENTH VETERAN REGIMENT OF INFANTRY. 

In Spring, 1864, Colonel Van Schaack, under proper authority, 
commenced the formation of a regiment, under the above title, and 
the organization took place at Hart's Island, New York harbor. 
The companies were mustered in the United States service for three 
years: A, B, C, D and E March 29th, May ist, June 4th, July 15th, 
and August 9th, 1864, respectively; for one, two and three years, and 
Company F, Sept. ist, 1864 ; for one and three years. Company G, 
Sept. 17th, 1864 ; and for one year, Companies H, I and K, October 
13th, 22d and 31st, 1864, respectively. The three years' men of the 
original Seventh Regiment, serving with the 5 2d N. Y. Vols., were 
assigned to Companies A, B, C and D of this regiment, July 2 2d, 
1864. The companies were recruited principally : A and C at 
Brooklyn and New York City ; B.at Brooklyn, New York City and 
Albany ; and the other companies in New York City, Brooklyn, 
Jamaica, Tarrytown, Albany, Poughkeepsie, Goshen, Schenectady, 
Kingston and Troy. 

The regiment left the state in detachments, the first. Company A, 
in x\pril, 1864 ; the companies, as they arrived, were attached to the 
52d N. Y. Vols., and served as a part of this regiment until July 2 2d, 
1864, when it appears on the records as a distinct organization. The 
regiment served in the Third, and for a time in the Consolidated 
Brigade, First Division, Second Corps, A. P., and was honorably dis" 



372 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



charged and mustered out, under the command of Colonel Van 
Schaack, August 4th, 1865, ^^ Hart's Island, New York harbor. 

During its service it lost by death, killed in action, 2 officers, 29 
enlisted men; of wounds received in action, i officer, 18 enlisted 
men ; of disease and other causes, 53 enlisted men ; total, 3 officers, 
100 enlisted men ; aggregate, 103 ; of whom 9 died in the hands of 
the enemy ; and it, or portions of it, took part in the following 
engagements, etc.: Wilderness, Va., May 5-7; Spotsylvania Court 
House, Va., May 8 to 21 ; North Anna, Va., May 22-26; Totopoto- 
moy, Va., May 27-31 ; Cold Harbor, Va., June 1-12; before Peters- 
burg, Va., June 15, 1864, to April 2, 1865; assault of Petersburg, 
Va., June 15-19; Weldon Railroad, Va., June 21-23; Deep Bottom, 
Va., July 27-29; Strawberry Plains, Va., August 14-18; Ream's Sta- 
tion, Va., August 25 ; Hatcher's Run, Va., December 8-10, 1864; 
Petersburg Works, Va., March 25 ; Appomattox campaign, Va., 
March 28 to April 9, 1865. 

Heinlein, Philip — Age 32 years. Enlisted September 8 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, September 8, 
serve one year; mustered out with detachment, June 19 
Hart's Island, New York harbor. 

Kissel, Albert — Age 19 years. Enlisted September 8, 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co G, September 8, 
serve one year; killed April 2, 1865, near South Side Railroad, Va 



NINETY-FIRST REGIMENT OF INFANTRY (VETERAN). 

Albany Regiment ; Columbia Regiment. 

This regiment was organized at Albany December i6th, 1861, by 
the consolidation of the regiment recruited by Colonel David J. 
Cowles, with the men recruited for the Fredenhall Regiment, and 
the appointment of Jacob Van Zandt as its Colonel. It was mus- 
tered in the service of the United for three years between September 
and December, 1861. While on its veteran furlough, in September, 
1864, it received a large number of recruits, enlisted and mustered 
in for one year's service. At the expiration of its term of enlist- 



1864, 


at 


1864, 


to 


1865, 


at 


864. 


at 


1864, 


to 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 373 

ment, the men entitled thereto were discharged and the regiment 
retained in service. June 5th, 1865, it received the men of the 147th 
New York Vols, not mustered out with their regiment. 

The companies were recruited principally : A, B, D, F and K at 
Albany ; C at Redford and Albany ; E at Hudson and Albany ; G at 
Schenectady ; H at Albany and Hillsdale ; and I at Albany, 
Chatham, Castleton and Hudson. 

The regiment left the state January 9th, 1862 ; it served at and 
near Washington, D. C, from January, 1862 ; at Key West, Fort 
Pickens and Pensacola, Fla., from later in January, 1862 ; at Baton 
Rouge, La., from December 19th, 1862 ; in Third Brigade, Grover's 
Division, Department of the Gulf, from January 12th, 1863 ; in First 
Brigade, Fourth Division, 19th Corps, from March, 1863 ; at Fort 
Jackson, La., as heavy artillery, from July, 1863 ; at Baltimore, Md., 
in Second Separate Brigade, Eighth Corps, from October, 1864 ; in 
First Brigade, Third Division, Fifth Corps, except Company E, 
which remained at Baltimore, from March, 1865 ; in Third Brigade, 
Third Division, Fifth Corps, from June, 1865 ; and it was honorably 
discharged and mustered out, under Colonel Jonathan Tarbell, July 
3d, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

During its service the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 2 
officers, 62 enlisted men ; of wounds received in action, 2 officers, 48 
enlisted men ; of disease and other causes, i officer, 187 enlisted 
men ; total, 5 officers, 297 enlisted men ; aggregate, 302 ; of whom 2 
enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy ; and it took part in the 
following engagements, etc.: Milton, Fla., August 9-10 ; Gonzales, 
Fla., October 27, 1862 ; near Port Hudson, La., March 14 ; Madam 
Porter's and Mc Williams' Plantations, La., April 13 ; Irish Bend, 
La., April 14; Bayou Vermillion, La., April 17; Moundville, La., 
May I ; Siege of Port Hudson, La., May 23 to July 8 ; Donaldson- 
ville. La., June 27 ; Bayou LaFourche, La., July 13, 1863 ; before 
Petersburg, Va., March i to April 2 ; Appomattox campaign, Va., 
March 28 to April 9, 1865. 



374 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Adams, Edgar — Age i8 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September 8, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Adams, John — Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, August 30, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Albertie, William — Age 42 years— Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. I, September 2, 1864; dis- 
charged May 16, 1865, at Patterson Park Hospital, Baltimore, Md. 

Austin, Peter — Age 23 years. Enlisted November 23, 1861, at, 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. H, 
December 6, 1861 ; killed in action May 25, 1863, before Port Hudson, 
La. 

Bailey, Abram — Age 22 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; died of typhoid fever October 8, 1S64, at Fort 
McHenry, Md. 

Baldus, Henry — Age 23 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 8, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near 
Washington, D. C. 

Barker, Robert — Age 27 years. Enlisted September 3, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 6, 1864; absent, sick at Lincoln Hospital, Washington, D. C, 
at muster out of company. 

Bemore, Valentine— Age 38 years. Enlisted September 3, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. I, Septem- 
ber 5, 1864; discharged June 9, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Bennett, Henry C. — Age 44 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. F, September 7, 1864; 
discharged June 8, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Bennett, James alias John— Age 34 years. Enlisted at Schenec- 
tady to serve one year, and mustered in as private, unassigned, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; discharged January 17, 1865. 

Bond, Jacob— Age 39 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year, and mustered in as private Co. H, August 18, 1864; discharged 
June 21, 1865, at Mower Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Bowtell, John H. — Age 30 years. Enlisted November 20, 186 1, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as corporal Co. G, 



SOLDIERvS OF CIVIL WAR. 375 

November 23, 1861; promoted sergeant March i, 1863; discharged 
for disability March 8, 1864. 

Brady, Edward — Age 28 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861; on detached service in October, 1864; no further 
record. 

Brockway, Josebins — Age 43 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private, unassigned August 25, 
1864; discharged May 10, 1865, at Hart's Island, New York harbor; 
also borne as John. 

Bronk, Elias — Age 19 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at Schenec- 
tady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, September 
3, 1864; wounded in action March 31, 1865, at Gravelly Run, Va. ; 
discharged June 8, 1865, at Albany, N. Y. 

Burns, Patrick — Age 27 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
September 30, 1861; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; mus- 
tered out with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Cady, Martin — Age 25 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. G, December 20, 1861 ; 
discharged December 23, 1864. 

Carr, James — Age ^s years. Enlisted November 20, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
November 23, 1861; missing in action June 14, 1863, before Port 
Hudson, La. 

Carson, William — Age 27 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861; killed in action May 27, 1863, before Port Hudson, 
La. 

Collins, William — Age 30 years. Enlisted October 12. 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as corporal Co. G, 
October 14, 1861; promoted sergeant prior to April, 1863; returned 
to ranks, no date; discharged December 18, 1864. 

Conlin, Patrick — Age 22 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 23, 1864; dis- 
charged June 29, 1865, at Satterlee Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa.; also 
borne as Conden. 

Cordell, Christopher — Age 19 years. Enlisted September 5, 1864, 
at Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, 



376 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

September 7, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, 
near Washington, D. C. 

Cordell, James— Age 16 years. Enlisted September 5, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 7, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near 
Washington, D. C- 

Couse, Ezra — Age 31 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year, and mustered in as private Co. H, September 8, 1864; dis- 
charged June 12, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Couse, Theodore — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. H, September 8, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Daley, Thomas — Enlisted at Schenectady to serve three years, and 
mustered in as private Co. G, December 16, 1861; discharged for 
disability March 8, 1864. 

Davenport, William— Age 24 years. Enlisted February 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
March 3, 1864; on detached service since October, 1864; no further 
record. 

DeLong, Peter — Age 37 years. — Enlisted November 6, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
November 9, 1861 ; wounded in action June 14, 1863, before Port 
Hudson, La.; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; killed in 
action April 4, 1865, at Gravelly Run, Va. 

Duffey, James — Age 20 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September 9, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Duntz, Nelson — Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. H, September 8, 1864; dis- 
charged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Dwyer, Daniel — Age 23 years. Enlisted August 9, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. F, August 
10, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; also borne as Dewire. 

Eldridge, David — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. I, September 8, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June lo, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Evans, George A. — Age 23 years. Enlisted August 22, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. H, August 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 377 

27, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Wash- 
ington, D. C. ; also borne as Evens. 

Parrel, Richard — Age 20 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. D, July 20. 1864; absent 
at muster out of company; also borne as Farrell. 

Fay, Thomas^ — Age 30 years. Enlisted October 20, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 23, 1861 ; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Finlay, James — Age 18 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861; on detached service since October, i"864; no further 
record. 

Fisher, John M. — Age 37 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. F, September 7, 1864; must- 
ered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Fowler, James — Age 43 years. Enlisted November 21, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Nov- 
ember 22, 1861 ; no further record. 

Gaffney, Michael — Age 37 years. Enlisted October 28, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years ; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 31, 1861 ; wounded in action May 27, 1863, before Port 
Hudson, La.; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; promoted 
corporal September 14, 1864; mustered out with company July 3, 
1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Gardner. James — Age 20 years. Enlisted February 24, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
March 3, 1864; discharged June 27, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Gardner, William H.^ — Age 23 years. Enlisted February 24, 1864, 
at Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
March 3, 1864; mustered out with company July 3, 1865, near Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Gates, Charles. — Age 19 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectad}^ to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861; re-eniisted as a veteran January i, 1864; discharged 
July 20, 1865, at New York City. 

Getman, William C. — Age 20 years. Enlisted at' Schenectady to 
serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. G, December 20, 



378 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

1861; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; mustered out with 
company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Gill, Cornelius — Age 21 years. Enrolled September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as sergeant Co. G, 
September 30, 1861; promoted first sergeant March i, 1863; mustered 
in as second lieutenant Co. C, June i, 1864; as first lieutenant Co. G, 
January 20, 1865; mustered out with company July 3, 1865, near 
Washington, D. C. ; commissioned second lieutenant February 9, 

1864, with rank from September i, 1863, vice W. P. Clark, killed in 
action; first lieutenant December 24, 1864, with rank from December 
19, 1864, vice W. Harty, promoted. 

Goodspeed, William — Age 23 years. Enlisted August 15, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, August 
18, 1864; discharged May 30, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Gorgon, Peter — Age 17 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. F, September 19, 1864; dis- 
charged June 9, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Gow, John — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 30, 1864: promoted 
corporal October 19, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 

1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Gutzman, Julius C. — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. B, September 6, 1864; 
discharged June 2, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Hagadorn, Ezekiel — Age 36 years. Enlisted December i, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as corporal Co. G, 
December 4, 1861; wounded in action April 14, 1863, at Irish Bend, 
La.; discharged for wounds April 10, 1864, at New Orleans, La. 

Hallenbeck, Adam — Age 20 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. B, August 23, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, 
D. C. ; also borne as HoUenbeck. 

Happs, John G. — Age 27 years. Enlisted September 5, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sept- 
ember 7, 1864; absent, wounded, at muster out of company; also 
borne as Hopp. 

Harty, William — Age 22 years. Enrolled December 11, 1 861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as second lieutenant 
Co. G, December 16, 1861; as first lieutenant April 3, 1863; as cap- 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR 



379 



tain Co. A, January 20, 1865; mustered out with company July 3, 
1865, near Washington, D. C; commissioned second lieutenant Dec- 
ember 20, 1861, with rank from December 3, 1861, original; first 
lieutenant February 25, 1863, with rank from December 31, 1862, vice 
G. W. Schaffer, promoted; captain December 24, 1864, with rank 
from December 10, 1864, vice E. A. Selkirk, discharged. 

Harvey, James — ge 40 years. Enlisted November 13, 1861, at 
Schenectady to- serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
November 14, 1863, before Port Hudson, La. ; discharged for dis- 
ability March 8, 1864. 

Hauf, Martin — Age 36 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustejed in as private Co. C, August 31, 1864; mustered 
out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. ; also 
borne as Maurice. 

Hayden, John C. — Age 30 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. L, Septeinber 3, 1864; dis- 
charged June 5, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Hogan, John — Age 32 years. Enlisted December 10, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
December 11, 1861; killed in action June 14, 1863, before Port 
Hudson, La. 

Hogan, Michael — Age 21 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861 ; no further record. 

Holmes, Edward R. — Age 30 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year; mustered in as private Co. H, August 3, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Hopman, Henry — Age 22 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September i', 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Housen, John — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near 
Washington, D. C. 

Housen, Peter — Age 20 years. Enlisted August ;^o, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near 
Washington, D. C. 

Hughes, John — Age 20 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 



38o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861; died of disease November 30, 1863, at Brasher City, 
La. 

Ingalls, Eli — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year, and mustered in as private Co. H, September 8, 1864; mustered 
out with detachment June 10, 1865. near Washington, D. C. 

Jackson, Allan H. — Age 26 years. Enrolled October i, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as captain Co. G, 
December 10, 1861; discharged February 23, 1863, by promotion to 
major of 134th Infantry; commissioned captain December 20, 1861, 
with rank from October i, 1861, original. 

Jacobs, Henry F. — Age 29 years. Enrolled September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as sergeant Co. G, 
September 30, 1861 ; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; pro- 
moted first sergeant no date ; mustered in as second lieutenant Sep- 
tember 3, 1864; as first lieutenant Co. B, December 7, 1864; dis- 
charged January 19, 1865; commissioned second lieutenant June 6, 
1864, with rank from May 5, 1864, vice W. Diamond discharged; 
first lieutenant November 30, 1864, with rank from November 17, 
1864, vice J. H. Stewart, promoted. 

Jermain, John H.^Age 30 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, September 10, 1864; 
died June 9, 1865, at Carver Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Johnson, Abram — Age 29 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 25, 1864; wounded 
in action, no date; died of his wounds April 27, 1865, at Washington, 
D. C. 

Johnson, Stephen — Age 30 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 25, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Jones, Rensselaer — Age 22 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. H, August 23, 1864; 
mustered out with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Jones, William S. — Age 26 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. G, January i, 1862; 
re-enlisted as a veteran March 21, 1864; promoted sergeant Septem- 
ber 14, 1864; first sergeant same date; discharged January 4, 1865, 
by promotion to first lieutenant Fifty-second Infantry. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. ' 381 

Jordan, Anthony — Age 21 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 6, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near 
Washington, D. C. 

Kable, John — Age 39 years. Enlisted September 2, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 7, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near 
Washington, D. C. 

Kane, James — Age 21 years. Enlisted November 8, 186 1, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
November 9, 1861 ; wounded in action May 27, 1863, before Port Hud- 
son, La. ; died of his wounds June 8, 1863, at hospital, New Orleans, 
La. 

Kearney, Richard — Age 22 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. G, December 16, 
1861; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; promoted corporal 
September 14, 1864; sergeant, no date ; mustered out with company 
July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. ; also borne as Carney. 

Keffe, Patrick — Age 35 years. Enlisted December 10, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
December 11, 1861 ; wounded in action May 27, 1863, before Port 
Hudson, La.; died of disease October i, 1863, at Brasher City, La.; 
also borne as Keefe. 

Kelly, Peter — Age 30 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at Schenec- 
tady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, September 6, 
1864; died of wounds April 8, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

King, Casper — Age 19 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. C, Septem- 
ber 3, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near 
Washington, D. C. 

King, Charles — Age 22 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861 ; discharged for disability January, 1863. 

Knight, Samuel — Age 40 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. C, Sep- 
tember 6, 1864; died of disease November 10, 1864, at Relay House, 
Md. 

Lacy, John — Age 20 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year, and mustered in as private Co. B, October 24, 1864; wounded 



382 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

in action, no date; discharged June 30, 1865, at David's Island, New 
York Harbor. 

Lappies, William — Age 34 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861; no further record. 

Lappies, William H. — Age 22 years. Enlisted October i, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 2, 1861; died of disease May 4, 1863, at Hospital, Baton 
Rouge, La. 

Latta, Byron E. — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. K, September 7, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Lawrence, William — Age 45 years. Enlisted September 5, 1864, 
at Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 6, 1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865. near 
Washington, D. C. 

Leaning, Clarence — Age 19 years. Enlisted November 4, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
Novembers, 1861; discharged for disability January, 1863; also borne 
as Laning. 

Louk, Peter — Age 41 years. Enlisted November 6, 1861, at Schen- 
ectady to serve three years ; mustered in as private Co. G, November 
9, 1 861 ; died of disease, no date, at Pensacola, Fla. 

Maloney, Anthony — Age 21 years. Enlisted November 3, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
November 5, 1861 ; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Mathews, William — Age 21 years. Enlisted November 5, i86r, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Nov. 
7, 1861 ; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; promoted corporal, 
no date; returned to ranks October 19, 1864; mustered out with com- 
pany July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

McDarby, Levi — Age 27 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. H, September 8, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

McGalpin, David— Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September 5, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 383 

McGrath, John — Age 18 years. Enlisted December 15, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered as drummer Co. G, 
December 16, 1861; returned to grade of private, no date; re-enlisted 
as a veteran January i, 1864; mustered out with company July 3, 
1865, near Washington, D. C. 

McSherry, James — Age 32 years. Enlisted October 5, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 9, 1861 ; wounded in action April 14, 1863, at Irish Bend, 
La.; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; mustered out with 
company near Washington, D. C. 

Miller, William H. — Age 22 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. I, September 3, 1864; 
discharged "June 7, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Moon, James W. — Age 25 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. H, September 8, 1864; dis- 
charged July 5, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Moore, Norman — Age 44 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. H, September i, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Moran, Anthony — Age 34 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 6, 1864; discharged June 3, 1865, at Washington, D. C. ; also 
borne as Morand. 

Mulick, Thomas — Age 34 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 31, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Niles, Isaac — Age 22 years. Enlisted December 6, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
December 9, 1861; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; dis- 
charged July 8, 1865, at Albany, N. Y. 

Nuber, Jacob — Age 25 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September i, 1864; 
wounded in action, no date; discharged May 31, 1865, at Washington, 
D. C. 

O'Brien, John — Age 27 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. G, December 20, 1861; 
wounded in action May 25. 1863, before Port Hudson, La. ; re-enlisted 
as a veteran January i, 1864; mustered out with company July 3, 
1865, near Washington, D. C. 



384 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Ossenfort, Charles — Age 29 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 30, 1864; 
absent, wounded, at muster out of company. 

Page, Levi — Age 20 years. Enlisted September i, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 2, 1864; wounded in action March 31, 1865, at Gravelly Run, 
Va. ; discharged for disability May 31, 1865, at McClellan Hospital, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Peek, John — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 30, 1864; mustered 
out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Peloquin, Peter — Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as musician Co. C, January 6, 1865 ; 
mustered out with company July 3, 1865, near Ball's Cross Roads, 
Va. 

Plaford, Edward A. — Age 22 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. H, September 2, 1864; 
transferred to Co. A, October 3, 1864; died January 12, 1865, at Fort 
McHenry, Md. ; also borne as Playford. 

Plumb, Henry — Age ^6 years. Enlisted October 30, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
November i, 1861; died of disease March 6, 1864, at Fort Jackson, 
La. 

Piatt, Albert — Age 36 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 30, 1864; mustered 
out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Powers, Martin — Age 25 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, September 5, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Quackenbush, Daniel D. — Age 26 years. Enlisted November 5, 
1 86 1, at Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. 
G, November 7, 1861; wounded in action May 27, 1863, before Port 
Hudson, La.; discharged for disability March 5, 1864. 

Reese, James E.— Age 18 years. Enlisted October 20, 1861. at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 21, 18G1; no further record. 

Reilly, James— Age 22 years. Enrolled September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as first sergeant Co. 
G, September 30, i86r; as second lieutenant December 31, 1862; 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 385 

transferred to Co. K, no date; mustered in as first lieutenant Co. C, 
Aug-ust 31, 1864; as captain Co. G, March 29, 1865; discharged to 
date, July 3, 1865; commissioned second lieutenant February 25, 
1863, with rank from December 31, 1862, vice W. Harty, promoted; 
first lieutenant June 20, 1864, with rank from June 13, 1864, vice W. 
P. Barker, resigned; captain May 11, 1865, with rank from March 2, 
1865, vice W. L. Evans, discharged. 

Relyea, John — Age 26 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. H, August 26, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Ross, David — Age 27 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, at Schenec- 
tady to serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, September 5, 
1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, 
D. C. 

Ryan, John — Age 24 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. G, December 16, 1861; 
wounded in action June 14, 1863, before Port Hudson, La. ; dis- 
charged for wounds April 9, 1864, at New Orleans, La. 

Sarsfield, Michael — Age 34 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. G, December 9, 1861 ; no 
further record. 

Schoolcraft, John — Age 41 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 31, 1864; 
killed in action March 31, 1865, at Gravelly Run, Va. 

Seiveking, Henry — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September i, 1864; 
died of disease November 4, 1864, at Fort McHenry, Md. ; also borne 
as Sieveking. 

Sepf, Fidell — Age 28 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve two 
years, and mustered in as private Co. A, July 25, 1864; discharged 
July 10, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Shoffold, Fidel — Age 29 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, September 5, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. ; 
also borne as Schaffold and Shofold. 

Shoffold, Frank — Age 25 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, August 27, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. ; 
also borne as Shaffold and Sheffold. 



386 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Shoudy, James — Age 28 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 31, 1864; pro- 
moted corporal, no date; mustered out with detachment June 10, 
1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Sky, George — Age 23 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. K, May 5, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Smith, Hugh — Age 42 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September 6, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Snyder, Morgan L. — Age 24 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. I, September 3, 1864; 
discharged, no date, at Harewood Hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Soreborn, Nicholas — Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, August 30, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, 
D. C. ; also borne as Soerborn and Sourborn. 

Spring, Mitchell — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as private Co. H, August 31, 1864; died, 
June, 1865, at hospital, Washington, D. C. 

Steinhaeur, Frederick — Age 20 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 30, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Stone, Levi— Age 24 years. Enlisted November 9, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
November 12, 1861; wounded in action June 14, 1863, before Port 
Hudson, La.; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; died of 
disease February 15, 1865, at Camp Bradford, Md. 

Sullivan, James — Age 35 year. Enlisted October i, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G. 
October 2, 1861 ; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Swart, Philip — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year; mustered in as private Co. H, August 30, 1864; mustered 
out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Sweeney, Daniel— Age 23 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as sergeant Co. G, 
September 30, 1861; discharged for disability February 16, 1863. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 387 

Sweeney, Hug^h — Age 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
three years, and mustered in as private Co. G, December 20, 1861; 
wounded in action May 27, 1863, before Port Hudson, La. ; re-enlisted 
as a veteran January i, 1864; killed in action March 31, 1865, at 
Gravelly Run, Va. 

Thompson, John — Enlisted October i, 1861, at Schenectady to serve 
three years; mustered in as private Co. G, October 2, 1861; dis- 
charged for disability July 20, 1862. 

Thornton, Alvin — Age 29 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861 ; promoted corporal prior to April, 1863; wounded in 
action May 25, 1863, before Port Hudson, La. ; re-enlisted as a vet- 
eran January i, 1864; returned to ranks October 6, 1864; mustered 
out with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Thornton, John L. — Age 24 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, 
at Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as sergeant Co. G, 
September 30, 1861; wounded in action May 27, 1863, before Port 
Hudson, La.; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; returned to 
ranks October 6, 1864; absent, in confinement, at Fort McHenry, 
Md. , at muster out of company. 

Thurber, Jacob — Age 24 years. Enlisted October i, 1864, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 2, 1861; died of disease October 22, 1863, at Brasher City, La. 

Thurber, James — Age 22 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, Sep- 
tember 30, 1861; re enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; died of 
chronic diarrhoea August 15, 1864, at Schenectady, N. Y. 

Thurber, Mathias — Age 24 years. Enlisted October i, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private, Co. G, 
October 2, 186 1 ; no further record. 

Truax, John — Ag-e 19 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve one 
year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September 6, 1864; dis- 
charged June 14, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Turner, William — Age 21 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in as a private Co. E, Septembers, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 19, 1865, at Baltimore, Md. 

Tymeson, Jacob — Age 28 years. Enlisted December 7, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as wagoner Co. G> 



388 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY, 

December 9, 1861; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; dis- 
charged for disability January 23, 1865. 

Van Patten. Henry — Age 26 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year; mustered in as private Co. G, September 2, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Van Patten, James — Age 42 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September 2, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Van Voast, Adam — Age 31 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, August 31, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. ; 
also borne as Van Vorst. 

Van Vranken, Cornelius — Age 36 years. Enlisted December 3, 
1 86 1, at Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private 
Co. G, December 6, 1861; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; 
mustered out with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Van Wormer, Peter A. — Age 42 years. Enlisted at Schenectady 
to serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. C, August 27, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Vein, Benjamin — Age 25 years. Enlisted October 23, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
October 26, 1861 ; discharged for disability, February 16, 1863; also 
borne as Vine. 

Waggoner, William — Age 21 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, 
at Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
September 30, 1861; re-enlisted as a veteran March 21, 1864; promoted 
sergeant September 14, 1864; first sergeant, no date; mustered out 
with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Walker, Albert F.— Age 29 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. I, September 3, 1864; 
discharged May 30, 1865, at Washington, D. C. 

Walton, Richard — Age 21 years. Enlisted September 26, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, 
September 30, 1861 ; no further record. 

Weaver, Charles— Age 18 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. H, September 8, 
1864; killed in action March 31, 1865, at Gravelly Run, Va. 

Welch, William— Age 32 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 389 

one year, and mustered in as private Co. B, October 24, 1864; dis- 
charged June 29, 1865 at Satterlee Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Whittenberger, Frederick — Age 39 years. Enlisted at Schenectady 
to serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. G, September 5, 
1864; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, 
D. C. 

Williams, Charles W. — Age 23 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve one year, and mustered in as private Co. A, September i, 1864; 
mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

Wortmaster Valentine — Age 30 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to 
serve three years, and mustered in as private Co. A, July 26, 1864; 
mustered out with company July 3, 1865, near Washington, D. C. ; 
also borne as Whitemaster. 

Wyand, Philip— Age 20. years. Enlisted November 4, 1861, at 
Schenectady to serve three years; mustered in as private Co. G, No- 
vember 5, 1861 ; re-enlisted as a veteran January i, 1864; promoted 
corporal, no date; killed in action April 4, 1865, at Gravelly Run, Va. 

Yoppke, Carl — Age 39 years. Enlisted at Schenectady to serve 
one year, and mustered in ao private Co. G, September i, 1864; mus- 
tered out with detachment June 10, 1865, near Washington, D. C. 

TWENTY-FIFTH REGIMENT OF CAVALRY. 

Sickles' Cavalry. 

September 4th, 1863, Colonel Henry F. Liebenau received author- 
ity from the governor of the state to recruit a regiment of cavalry, 
which, January 15th, 1864, received the above numerical designa- 
tion. It was organized at Saratoga Springs and Hart's Island, under 
Colonel Liebenau, and his successor. Colonel Gurdon Chapin, for a 
service of three years ; Companies I and M, however, contained a 
few men enlisted for but one year. The companies were mustered 
in the service of the United States at Saratoga, A and B February 
20th ; C and D March 19th ; E and F April 14th and 23d, respec- 
tively ; at Hart's Island, G April 20th ; H July 29th ; I September 
i8th; K May i6th ; and L and M October 15th and 20th, 1864, 
respectively. 



390 SCHENECTADY 'COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The companies were recruited principally : A at Hancock, Sara- 
toga Springs, Fremont and Greene county ; B at Hancock, Root, 
Fremont and Stillwater ; C at New York City, Neversink, Goshen, 
Saratoga, Halfmoon and Montgomery ; D at Saratoga, Montgomery, 
New York City, Schenectady and Root ; E at Saratoga, Goshen, 
Kingston and New York City ; F at Saratoga and New York City ; 
G and K at New York City ; H at New York City, Brooklyn, Wil- 
liamsburgh, Goshen and Watertown ; I at New York City, Brooklyn, 
Alberg, Goshen, Jamaica, Poughkeepsie, Tarrytown and Troy ; L 
and M at New York City, Brooklyn, Jamaica, Goshen, Kingston, 
Plattsburgh, Tarrytown, Troy and Schenectady. 

The regiment left the state in 1864, by detachments, and served in 
the Defenses of Washington, D. C, 22d Corps, from April, 1864; i" 
the Provost Guard, Army of the Potomac, from June, 1864; at 
Washington, D. C, 22d Corps, from July 7th, 1864 ; in the P'ourth 
Brigade, First Division, Cavalry, A. P., from August, 1864 ; in the 
First Brigade, First Division, Cavalry, from September, 1864 ; in the 
Army of the Shenandoah from October, 1864; and in the Cavalry 
Division, Army of West Virginia, from April, 1865. 

Commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Aaron Seeley, the regiment 
was honorably discharged, and mustered out June 27th, 1865, at 
Hart's Island, New York Harbor, having during its service, lost by 
death, killed in action, i officer, 10 enlisted men ; of wounds received 
in action, 6 enlisted men ; of disease and other causes, 49 enlisted 
men ; total, i officer, 65 enlisted men ; aggregate, 66 ; of whom 7 
enlisted men died in the hands of the enemy. It, or portions of it, 
took part in the following engagements, etc.: White House Landing, 
Va., June 21 ; Charles City Court House, Va., June 25 ; Washington, 
D. C, July 11-13 ; Halltown, Va., August 26 ; Duffield Station, Va., 
August 27 ; Leetown, Va., August 29 ; Bunker Hill, Va., September 
2 ; Berry ville, Va., September 3-4 ; Opequon Creek, Va., September 
13 ; Opequon, Va., September 19 ; Fisher's Hill, Va., September 22 ; 
Front Royal, Va., September 23-24 ; Luray, Va., September 25 ; 
Port Republic, Va,, September 26-27 ; Woodstock, Va., October 9 ; 
near Conrad's Ferry, Va., October 22 ; Newtown, Va., November 12 ; 
White Plains, Va., November 27-28 ; Upperville, Va., Nov. 29 1 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 391 

Snicker's Gap, Va., November 30 ; Flint Hill, Va., December 20 ; 
Madison Court House, Va., December 21 ; Jack's Shop, Va., Decem- 
ber 22, 1864; Columbia Furnace, Va., January 19 and 29; Mount 
Jackson, Va., March 4 ; Harrisonburg, Va., March 5 ; Rood's Hill, 
Va., March 7 ; Staunton, Va., March 18, 1865. 

Barclay, Henry — Age 32 years. Enlisted September 3, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as first sergeant Co. L, October 15, 1864, 
to serve one year; discharged with detachment June 10, 1865, at 
Winchester, Va. 

Branwhite, William — Age 40 years. Enlisted September 9, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. L, October 15, 1864, to 
serve one year; discharged with detachment June 10, 1865, at Win- 
chester, Va. ; also borne as Broithwhite. 

Burns, John T. — Age 22 years. Enlisted February 5, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. D, March 19, 1864, to serve 
three years; appointed first sergeant, date not stated; mustered in as 
second lieutenant Co. L, Mays, 1865; mustered out with company, 
June 27, 1865, at Hart's Island, New York Harbor, commissioned 
second lieutenant April 22, 1865, to rank from March 27, 1865, vice 
Mangaroh, discharged. 

Hoffman, Chancy — Age 37 years. Enlisted September 7, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. L, October 15, 1864, to serve 
one year; mustered out, June 10, 1865, with detachment at Winchester, 
Va. 

Little, Hiram— Age 38 years. Enlisted February 5, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. D, March 19, 1864, to serve 
three years; absent, sick at Remount Camp, Md., since November 2, 
1864, and at muster out of company; no further record. 

Magill, John F.— Age 21 years. Enlisted February 5, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. D, February 5, 1864, to 
serve three years; appointed sergeant, date not stated; mustered 
out June 9, 1865, from McDougall General Hospital, New York 
Harbor. 

Russel, George W. — Age 16 years. Enlisted March 5, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, April 14, 1864, to serve 
three years; discharged as corporal for disability April 8, 1865. 

Schleth, Henry W. — Age 24 years. Enlisted September 9, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. L, October 15, 1864, to 



392 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY, 

serve one year; appointed corporal, date not stated; sergeant, to date 
May I, 1865; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, ^t Win- 
chester, Va. ; also borne as Schleith. 

Shaw, Henry A. — Age 22 years. Enlisted February 4, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. C, March 19, 1864, to serve 
three years; mustered out June 27, 1865, with company. 

Snyder, Peter H. — Age 18 years. Enlisted August 23, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. I, August 23, 1864, to serve 
one year; mustered out with detachment June 10, 1865, at Winchester, 
Va. 

FIRST REGIMENT OF MOUNTED RIFLES. 

After the battle of Big Bethel, Va., June loth, 1861, Major-Gen- 
eral Butler authorized Captain Judson Kilpatrick, Fifth New York 
Volunteer Infantry, to organize a squadron of cavalry for duty in 
General Butler's department. This authority was approved by the 
Secretary of War. 

The companies were recruited principally : A and B at New York 
City ; C and D — First and Second Cavalry Companies Tenth Legion 
— at Monticello, Grahamville, Fallsburgh, Clayville, Middletown, 
EUenville and Newburgh ; E at Troy, Albany, Fort Edward, Salem, 
Schenectady and New York City ; F at Troy, Buffalo and New York 
City ; G at Troy, Chatham and New York City ; H at Troy, Buffalo, 
Mt. Pleasant, Syracuse, Tarrytown and New York City ; I at 
Canaan, Carmel, Chatham, North Castleton and New York City ; K 
at Buffalo, Charlton, Livonia, Richmond, Springwater, Victor and 
New York City ; L at Lenox, Oneida, Rome, Syracuse and Verona ; 
and M at Chatham, North Castle and New York City. 

The regiment lost by death, killed in action, i officer, 18 enlisted 
men; of wounds received in action, i officer, 12 enlisted men ; of 
disease and other causes, 3 officers, 125 enlisted men ; total, 5 officers, 
155 enlisted men; aggregate, 160; of whom 8 enlisted men died in 
the hands of the enemy. 

Brady, Michael — Age 20 years. Enlisted August 11, 1862, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. H, August 11, 1862, to serve 
three years; re-enlisted September i, 1864; promoted corporal April 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 393 

26, 1865; transferred to Co. K, July 21, 1865; appointed sergeant 
August 15, 1865; designation of regiment changed to Fourth Provin- 
cial Cavalry, September 6, 1865. 

Burke, Jacob — Age 24 years. Enlisted August 13, 1862, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. H, August 13, 1862, to serve 
three years; mustered out June 12, 1865, at Richmond, Va. 

Conde, Henry A. — Age 22 years. Enlisted August i, 1862, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. H, August i, 1862, to serve 
three years; promoted corporal January 25, 1863; sergeant, Septem- 
ber 15, 1863; re-enlisted September i, 1864; transferred July 21, 1865, 
to Co. K; designation of regiment changed to Fourth Provincial 
Cavalry, September 6, 1865; prior service in Co. C, Seventh New 
York Cavalry. 

Heron, William T. — Age 22 years. Enlisted May 26, 1862, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. H, July 7, 1862, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. F, date not stated; captured at Scott's 
Mills, Va. , May 17, 1863; paroled May 23, 1863; re-enlisted Septem- 
ber I, 1864; transferred to Co. C, July 21, 1865, as sergeant; mus- 
tered out July 21, 1865, at Richmond, Va., as supernumerary. 

Hilderbrandt, Henry — Age 34 years. Enlisted August 13, 1862, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. H, August 12, 1862, to serve 
three years; promoted corporal December 14, 1862 ; sergeant, January 
I, 1864; commissary sergeant July 10, 1864; re-enlisted September i, 
1864; transferred to Co. K, July 21, 1865; designation of regiment 
changed to Fourth Provincial Cavalry September 6, 1865. 

June, Lewis S. — Age — years. Enlisted August 12, 1862, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. H, August 12, 1862, to 
serve three years; transferred to Co. F, July i, 1863; mustered out 
July 12, 1865, at Richmond, Va. 

Kilmartin, Jacob — Age 23 years. Enlisted June 2, 1862, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as private Co. E, June 19, 1862, to serve three 
years; transferred to Co.'s F and H, dates not stated; re-enlisted 
September i, 1864; promoted corporal November 10, 1864; trans- 
ferred to Co. K, July 21, 1865; mustered out July 21, 1865, at Rich- 
mond, Va. , as supernumerary. 

McMillen, Alexander — Age 34 years. Enlisted August 10, 1862, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. H, August 10, 1862, to serve 
three years; mustered out June 12, 1865, at Richmond, Va. 



394 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Smith, Lansing — Age 22 years. Enlisted January 4, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private, unassigned, Sixteenth Heavy 
Artillery, January 10, 1864, to serve three years; transferred to Co. 
H, First Mounted Rifles, May 26, 1864; to Co. K, July 21, 1865; dis- 
charged, to date August 30, 1865. 

Thomas, Daniel T. — Age 32 years. Enlisted January 2, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private, unassigned, Sixteenth Heavy 
Artillery, January 12, 1864, to serve three years; transferred to Co. 
H, First Mounted Rifles, May 26, 1864; to Co. K, July 21, 1865; 
designation of regiment changed to Fourth Provincial Cavalry, Sep- 
tember 6, 1865; also borne as Daniel Thomas. 



THIRTEENTH REGIMENT OF CAVALRY. 
Seymour Light Cavalry. 

October 9th, 1862, Colonel Henry E. Davies received authority to 
recruit a regiment of cavalry; November 12th, 1862, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Nathaniel Cole received orders to recruit the regiment, the 
Davies Light Cavalry, until Colonel Davies would report from the 
field. January i6th, 1863, Colonel David Webb, succeeded, on his 
death, by Colonel Henry S. Gansevoort, was authorized to recruit 
the Horatio Seymour Cavalry. January 28th, 1863, Colonel G. W. 
B. Tompkins received authority to recruit the Tompkins Cavalry. 
February 7th, 1863, Colonel Alfred W. 'Taylor was authorized to 
recruit the New York Brigade. December 4th, 1862, Colonel Henry 
F. Liebenau had received authority to recruit a regiment in the, 
then, first seven congressional districts of the state — the Seymour 
Light Infantry, These organizations were, June 20th, 1863, consoli- 
dated, and the Thirteenth Regiment of Cavalry formed of them, 
with H. E. Davies as Colonel, H. S. Gansevoort as Lieutenant- 
Colonel, and N. Cole as Major. The companies were mustered in 
the service of the United States for three years ; at Staten Island, A 
February 25th ; B May 25th ; C and D June i8th ; E June 19th ; F 
June 20th ; G July loth ; H August 7th ; and I November 23, 1863; 
at Riker's Island, K and L ; and at Hart's Island, M, in March, 1864. 

They were recruited principally : A, B, C, D and E, at New York 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 395 

City ; F at New York City, Rome and Utica ; G at New York City, 
Potsdam, Oswegatchie, Malone, Saratoga and Albany ; H, Halleck 
Guards, at New York City, Ogdensburgh, Malone, Watertown, 
Albany and Potsdam ; I at Albany, Buffalo and Watertown ; K, L 
and M, at New York City and Brooklyn. 

Six companies. A, B, C, D, E and F, left the state June 23d, 1863; 
Companies G and H, August 14th, 1863 ; the others in winter, 1863, 
and spring, 1864; the regiment served in the Pennsylvania campaign 
in June and July, 1863, (six companies), and after that in the 2 2d 
Corps, Department and Defenses of Washington, D. C. 

August 17th, 1865, the regiment, commanded by Colonel Henry 
S. Gansevoort, was consolidated at Washington with the Sixteenth 
New York Volunteer Cavalry, the consolidated force receiving the 
designation, Third Provisional Regiment, New York Volunteer 
Cavalry; the companies of the 13th becoming parts of the com- 
panies of the new organizations, as follows : A of G, B of M, C of 
H, D of D, E of L, F of A, G of B, H of F, I of E, K of K, L of C, 
M of I. 

During its service, the regiment lost by death, killed in action, 12 
enlisted men; of wounds received in action, 19 enlisted men; of 
disease and other causes, i officer, 98 enlisted men ; total, i officer, 
129 enlisted men ; aggregate, 130 ; of whom 27 enlisted men died in 
the hands of the enemy. 

O'Brien, Edmund L. — Age 30 years. Enlisted September 8, 1864, 
at Schenectady, N. Y. ; mustered in as private Co. M, September 8, 
1864, to serve one year; appointed corporal January 20, 1865; mus- 
tered out June 30, 1865, at Fairfax Court House, Va. 

Simmonds, Jacob E. — Age 21 years. Enlisted September 6, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, September 6, 1864, to 
serve one year; mustered out June 30, 1865, at Fairfax Court House, 
Va. ; also borne as Simmons, Jacob A. 

THIRTEENTH REGIMENT OF ARTILLERY (HEAVY). 

Colonel William A. Howard received authority May nth, 1863, 
to organize this regiment in New York City. 



396 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The companies were recruited all over the state. E at Schenec- 
tady, Ephratah, Providence, Clifton Park, Galway, Oppenheim, Am- 
sterdam, Saratoga, Ballston, Johnstown, New Albion, Glenville, 
Waterford, Randolph, Albany and Tompkins. 

The regiment left the state in detachments, the First Battalion, 
Companies A, B, C and D, leaving October 5th, 1863 ; it served as 
infantry and heavy artillery in the Departments of the East, until it 
left the state ; and of Virginia and North Carolina ; the First and 
Second Battalions in the Defenses of Norfolk and Portsmouth, Va., 
and Newbern, N. C; the Third Batallion as a coast-guard on board 
vessels of war along the Atlantic coast. Company C served at Fort 
Hamilton, New York Harbor, from September 12th, 1863, to Octo- 
ber 5th, 1863 ; Companies A and H as siege artillery in the Third 
Division, Eighteenth Corps, Army of the James, from May, 1864, at, 
and in the forces for the defense of Bermuda Hundred, Va., from 
January, 1865 ; Companies I, K, L and M in the Naval Brigade, 
x'Vrmy of the James, from July, 1864. 

The regiment lost in the service by death, killed in action, i 
officer, 2 enlisted men ; of wounds received in action, 2 enlisted men; 
of disease and other causes, 3 officers, 144 enlisted men ; total, 4 
officers, 148 enlisted men ; aggregate, 152 ; and portions of it took 
part in the following engagements, etc.: Operations against Peters- 
burg and Richmond, Va., May 5-31, 1864; before Petersburg, Va., 
June 15 to April 2, 1864-5; assault of Petersburg, Va., June 15-17; 
Swift Creek, N. C, October 7 ; Day's Point, Va., November 14-19; 
Fort Fisher, N. C, December 25, 1864 ; Fort Fisher, N. C, January 
15 ; Fall of Petersburg, Va., April 2, 1865. 

Ackerman, William A. — Age 43 years. Enlisted January 13, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to 
serve three years; mustered out June 17, 1865, at Norfolk, Va. 

Arnold, Charles — Age 18 years. Enlisted September 4, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, September 4, 1864, to 
serve one year; mustered out with detachment June 21, 1865, at Nor- 
folk, Va. 

Bell, William H. — Age 25 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, at 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 397 

Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, August 31, 1864, to serve 
one year; died December 30, 1864, at Base Hospital, Point of Rocks, 
Va. 

Bently, Francis — Age 38 years. Enlisted February 2, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth Ar- 
tillery, July 18, 1865; also borne as Bently, Francis A., and Bentley, 
Francis. 

Bently, Orling G. — Age 21 years. Enlisted January 4, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth 
Artillery July 18, 1865 ; also borne as Bentley, Orling G. 

Biteon, Hugh — Age 27 years. Enlisted February 9, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18, 1865; also borne as Biteon and Bitcum, Hugh. 

Blake, James — Age 23 years. Enlisted April 28, 1864, at Schenec- 
tady ; mustered in as private Co. H, April 28, 1864, to serve three 
years; promoted corporal May i, 1865; mustered out with detach- 
ment July 18, 1865, at Norfolk, Va. 

Bodwell, Joseph — Age 19 years. Enlisted January 15, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, January 18, 1863, to serve 
three years; no further record. 

Brithoup, Jacob — Age 44 years. Enlisted January 21, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. G, June 27, 1865; to Co. M, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18, 1865; also borne as Brithoupt, Jacob. 

Brodwell, Joseph — Age 19 years. Enlisted January 15, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; tranferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18, 1865. 

Brower, Jeremiah — Age 43 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, August 30, 1865, to serve 
one year; transferred to Co. K, April 14, 1865; mustered out with 
company June 28, 1865, at Norfolk, Va. 

Brower, Nicholas E. — Age 33 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, August 30, 1864, to serve 
one year; died November i, 1864, at Base Hospital, Point of Rocks, 
Va. 



398 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Burk, John C. — Age 30 years. Enlisted February 8, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; promoted corporal August 9, 1864; sergeant, March 24, 
1865; mustered out with detachment July 18, 1865, at Norfolk, Va. 

Bush, Jonathan T. — Age 18 years. Enlisted September i, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. I, September i, 1864, to 
serve one year; mustered out with company June 28, 1865, at Nor- 
folk, Va. 

Camp, Stephen — Age 44 years. Enlisted December 12, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, December 12, 1864, to 
serve three years; transferred to Co. K, April 14, 1865; mustered out 
with company June 28, 1865, at Norfolk, Va. 

Clements, Albert C. — Age 16 years. Enlisted September i. 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. I, September i, 1864, to 
serve one year; died January 8, 1865, in General Hospital, Va. 

Cramer, Peter W. — Age 30 years. Enlisted January 18, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; promoted sergeant March 10, 1864; reduced August 9, 
1864; transferred to Co. B, June 27, 1865; to Co. I, Sixth Artillery, 
July 18, 1865. 

Culver, Peter— Age 27 years. Enlisted January 8, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, January 12, 1864, to serve 
three years; no further record. 

Delaney, Patrick P.— Age 18 years. Enlisted August 29, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. B, August 29, 1864, to serve 
one year; mustered out with detachment June 21, 1865, at Norfolk, 
Va. 

Donnelly, John— Age 18 years. Enlisted August 3, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, August 3, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. D, June 27, 1865; to Co. L, Sixth 
Artillery July 18, 1865. 

Empie, Eli— Age 18 years. Enlisted August 5, 1864, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. M, August 5, 1864, to serve three 
years; mustered out with company June 28, 1865, at Norfolk, Va. 

Farnie, David— Age 27 years. Enlisted January 4, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; promoted sergeant August 24, 1864; reduced March 13, 
1865; promoted corporal May 18, 1865; mustered out July 18, 1865, at 
Norfolk, Va. ; also borne as Fannie, David. 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. 399 

Fraily, Peter — Age r8 years. Enlisted Aug-ust 5, 1864, at Schenec- 
tady; mustered in as private Co. M, August 5, 1864, to serve one 
year; mustered out with compan}^ June 28, 1865, at Norfolk, Va. ; 
also borne as Fralick, Peter. 

Hastings, James — Age 30 years. Enlisted September i, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, September i, 1864, to 
serve one year; promoted artificer January 17, 1865; mustered out 
with detachment June 21, 1865, at Portsmouth, Va. 

Hazelton, Erastus — Age 20 years. Enlisted January 19, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18, 1865. 

Hill, Ephraim — Age 37 years. Enlisted August 17, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, August 17, 1864, to serve 
one year; mustered out with company, June 28, at Norfolk, Va. 

Jessett, Joseph — Age 20 years! Enlisted January 20, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; promoted corporal March 10, 1864; reduced August 3, 
1864; transferred to Co. G, June 27, 1865; to Co. M, Sixth Artillery, 
July 18, 1865. 

Jessett, Robert — Age 21 years. Enlisted January 11, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. G, June 27, 1865; to Co. M, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18, 1865. 

Jimmerson, Reuben — Age 19 years. Enlisted January 25, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March, 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. D, August i, 1864; to Co. L, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18, 1865. 

Johnson, Ira — Age 28 years. Enlisted January 11, 1864, at Schen- 
ectady; mustered in as private Co. F, date not stated, to serve three 
years; no further record. 

Kenney, Garrett — Age 44 years. Enlisted December 31, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three yeai's; mustered out with detachment June 15, 1S65, at 
United States General Hospital, Portsmouth, Va. 

Kroft, Charles — Age 35 years. Enlisted January 17, 1864, a,t 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. G, June 27, 1865; to Co. M, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18, 1865. 



400 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Lansing, Merrills — Age 25 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, August 31, 1864, to serve 
one year; mustered out with company June 28, 1865, at Norfolk, Va. 

Lingenfiter, Evart — Age 29 years. Enlisted December 22, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. G, June 27, 1865; to Co. M, Sixth 
Artillery July 18. 1865. 

Maguyre, Richard — Age 37 years. Enlisted September 2, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, September 6, 1864, to 
serve three years; mustered out with detachment June 21, 1865, at 
Norfolk, Va. ; also borne as McGuire, Richard. 

Marsellas, Stephen V. — Age 18 years. Enlisted January 27, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, January 27, 1864, to 
serve three years; promoted corporal August 9, 1864; reduced Sep- 
tember 4, 1864; transferred to Co. B, June 27, 1865; to Co. I, Sixth 
Artillery July 18, 1865; also borne as Marseilles, Stephen V. 

Mayhen, Marens M. — Age 18 years. Enlisted January 24, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth 
Artillery July 18, 1865; alsoboroe as Mahen. 

McFarland, John A. — Age 35 years. Enlisted February i, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth 
Artillery July 18, 1865. 

Merrick, James E.— Age 28 years. Enlisted September i, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, September i, 1864, to 
serve one year; mustered out with company June 28, 1865, at Nor- 
folk, Va. 

Millman, Adam— Age 19 years. Enlisted January 2, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, no date, to serve three 
years; no further record. 

Myers, Augustus— Age 19 years. Enlisted December 16, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; promoted corporal March 10, 1864; reduced, date not 
stated; again promoted corporal August 9, 1864; reduced October 15, 
1864; transferred to Co. B, June 27, 1865; to Co. I, Sixth Artillery 
July 18, 1865; also borne as Meyers, Augustus. 

Newbegin, George— Age 39 years. Enlisted September i. 1864, at 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR. ' 401 

Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. G, September i, 1864, to 
serve one year; mustered out with detachment June 21, 1865, at 
Norfolk, Va. 

Noyes, Dana W. — Age 25 years. Enlisted September i, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, September i, 1864, to 
serve one year; promoted sergeant October 18, 1864; mustered out 
with company June 28, 1865. ^^ Norfolk, Va. 

Orling, Thomas — Age 22 years. Enlisted January 19, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private, unassigned, January 19, 1864, 
to serve three years; no further record. 

Patchin, Nelson E. — Age 26 years. Enlisted August 30, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, September 6, 1864, to 
serve one year; mustered out with detachment June 21, 1865, at Nor- 
folk, Va. 

Salisbury, William H. — Age 23 years. Enlisted August 31, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, September 6, 1864, to 
serve one year; mustered out June 21, 1865, with detachment, at Nor- 
folk, Va. 

Schofield, Wesley — Age 41 years. Enlisted August 15, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, August 15, 1864, to serve 
three years; promoted wagoner; reduced, date not stated; mustered 
out with detachment June 21, 1865, at Norfolk, Va. 

Scofield, Wesley — Age 41 years. Enlisted August 15, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private, unassigned, August 15, 1864, 
to serve three years; no further record. 

Seelye, Charles — Age 19 years. Enlisted February 2, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; promoted corporal August 9, 1864; reduced, date not 
stated; transferred to Co. B, June 27, 1865; to Co. I, Sixth Artillery, 
July 18, 1865; also borne as Seeley, Charles. 

Shaver, George — Age 19 years. Enlisted January 20, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; promoted corporal December 23, 1864; reduced Febru- 
ary 9, 1865; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18, 1865. 

Slater, Mortimer — Age 44 years. Enlisted December 31, 1863, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. M, December 31, 1864, to 
serve three years; mustered out with company June 28, 1865, at Nor- 
folk, Va. 



402 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Snell, Norman — Age 24 years. Enlisted August 29, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. A, August 29, 1864, to serve 
one year; mustered out with detachment June 21, 1865, at Norfolk, 
Va. 

Underhill, William H. — Age 34 years. Enlisted January 25, 1864, 
at Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to 
serve three years; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, 
Sixth Artillery, July 18, 1865. 

Vedder, Albert W. — Age 23 years. Enlisted September i, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. F, September i, 1864, to 
serve three years; mustered out with detachment June 21, 1865, at 
Norfolk, Va. 

Vernett, Victor — Age 26 years. Enlisted January 13, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 10, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18, 1865; also borne as Vernert, Victor. 

Warnett, Victor — Age 26 years. Enlisted January 13, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private, unassigned, January 13, 1864, 
to serve three years ; no further record. 

Whittaker, Warren — Age 20 years. Enlisted January 20, 1864, at 
Schenectady; mustered in as private Co. E, March 20, 1864, to serve 
three years; transferred to Co. C, June 27, 1865; to Co. K, Sixth 
Artillery, July 18. 1865; also borne as Whittaker, Warren, and War- 
ren T. 

ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY-SEVENTH INFANTRY. 

The 177th was formerly the Tenth Regiment New York State 
National Guard of the city of Albany. It was enlisted in October, 
1862, for nine months, but it was called upon to serve within two 
weeks of the year, and those who did serve, served most heroically. 
They were ordered at once to the Department of the Gulf and served 
in Louisianna. While at Baton Rouge the record shows that men 
were dying by scores from zymotic disease, as diphtheria, typhoid 
fever and the like. Men fled from the regiment by scores, and of 
the thirty-five men who enlisted from Schenectady, sixteen deserted. 
The roll of honor of those who served through or died in service we 
give as follows : 



SOLDIERS OF CIVIL WAR 403 

Clute, Peter C. — Enlisted October, 1862; died in service April 23, 

1863. 

Frangen, Mathew — Enlisted October, 1862; served through. 

Joynt, William — Enlisted October, 1862; served through. 

Keeler, Harrison H. — Enlisted October, 1862; served through. 

Lally, James — Enlisted October, 1862; promoted to corporal and 
sergeant; served through. 

Morrison, Isaac R. — Enlisted October, 1862; died in service May 
17, 1863. 

Penkerton, Howard — Enlisted October, 1862; served through. 

Pilling, William — Enlisted October, 1862; promoted to corporal 
and sergeant; served through. 

Potter, Alonzo — Enlisted November, 1862; died in service April 18, 
1863. 

Rose, James — Enlisted October, 1862; served through. 

Russell, George A. — Enlisted November, 1862; died in service 
April 18, 1863. 

Stern, Henry C. — Enlisted October, 1862; served through. 

Stern, Moses — Enlisted October, 1862; served through. 

Wolcott, Andrew — Enlisted October, 1862; served through. 

Vroman, William— Enlisted October, 1862; discharged for disa- 
bility March 9, 1863. 



Captain Jacob Gerling— Enlisted at New York City for three 
years; mustered in as private Co. E, Morgan Rifles, October 14, 1861 ; 
transferred to Co. A, 58th Infantry, November 23, 1861; discharged 
for disability June 21, 1862, at Winchester, Va. Afterwards held 
rank of captain in National Guard. 

ONE HUNDRED AND NINETY-SECOND INFANTRY. 

This regiment received enormous bounty. Men are scattered 
through it whose names are not known, and who were undoubtedly 
gathered from all over the Canadas to fill the quota. They went to 
the field as the war was ended, and were mustered out in August, 1865- 

It is believed that the bounties paid the men of this command 
abundantly rewarded their short service, and that they earned so 
much money for such short service that they are not entitled to the 
additional reward of fame. 



404 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

CHAPTER XXVL 

SCHENECTADY SOLDIERS IN THE SPANISH WAR. 

The Second Regiment New York Infantry, United States Vohin- 
teers, assembled on Hempstead Plains, Long Island, May 2, 1898. 
The officers of the regiment were : 

Colonel, Edward E. Hardin, Seventh U. S. Infantry. 

Lieutenant-Colonel, James H. Lloyd, Thirteenth Battalion, N. G. 
N. Y. 

Major, James W. Lester, Fourteenth Battalion, N. G. N. Y. 

Major, Austin A. Yates, Fifteenth Battalion, N. G. N. Y. 

Surgeon, Lewis Balch, Major and Acting Assistant Surgeon-Gen- 
eral. 

Assistant Surgeons, First Lieutenant Henry C. Baum, Assistant 
Surgeon, Forty-first Separate Company, N. G. N. Y.; First Lieuten- 
ant Albert F. Brugman, Assistant Surgeon, Second Battery, N. G. 
N. Y. 

Chaplain, Hector Hall, D. D. 

Adjutant, First Lieutenant James J. Phelan, Adjutant, Thirteenth 
Battalion, N. G. N. Y. 

Quartermaster, First Lieutenant George ]\I. Alden, Quartermaster, 
Thirteenth Battalion, N. G. N. Y. 

Sergeant Major, W. Swift Martin, Sixth Separate Company, N. G. 
N. Y. 

Hospital Stewards, Frederick W. Schneider, Hospital Steward^ 
Thirteenth Battalion, N. G. N. Y., and George Mclntyre, Private, 
Twenty-first Separate Company, N. G. N. Y. 

Companies E and F, both of which were from Schenectady, were 
mustered into the. Second Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry, 
on May 16. 1898, and Major Austin A. Yates was placed in com- 
mand of the Fifteenth Battalion, of which they formed a part. 



SOLDIERS OF AMERICAN-SPANISH WAR. 



405 



On May i8th the regiment moved to Cliickamanga, Ga., where it 
remained until June ist, when it proceeded to Tampa, Fla. On 
arriving at Tampa, the regiment became part of General Shafter's 
Fifth Army Corps, then under orders to proceed by transports to 
Cuba. Owing to the lack of facilities for embarking troops and the 
scarcity of transports, the Second Regiment was left behind with the 
entire command under Brigadier-General Snyder. This was the 
severest knock the regiment suffered, as both officers and men were 
very anxious to go to the front, and had they gone they could not 
have suffered any more than they did in the pestiferous camp at 
Tampa, and in clearing ground under the broiling sun upon the 
sands of Fernandina. 

On July 20th an order was received for the regiment to proceed to 
Fernandina, but owing to the difficulty in obtaining transportation 
the movement was not begun until the 26th. On July 24th the 
regiment was transferred to the First Brigade, commanded by Briga- 
dier-General J. W. Cline in the Third Division, commanded by 
Brigadier-General Louis H. Carpenter of the Fourth Army Corps 
under General Coppinger. On August 21st, orders were received 
releasing the regiment from duty in the Third Division, Fourth 
Army Corps, and transferring it to the Department of the East, and 
directing it to proceed to Troy, N. Y. The movement began on 
August 24th, and on reaching Troy the regiment was quartered in 
Camp Hardin on the bank of Sand Lake. 

On October 26th, the mustering out of the regiment began, and 
on the 31st of that month. Companies E and F were mustered out. 
Following is the list of officers and men from Schenectady who were 
members of the Second Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry : 

ROLL OF COMPANY E, 

36th- Separate Company ob^ Schenectady. 

Schenectady Citizens Corps. 

James M. Andrews, ..... Captain 

George De B. Greene, - - - First Lieutenant 

Transferred to Battalion Adjutant May 23, 1898. 

27 



4o6 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Donald J. Htitton, .... First Lieutenant 

Promoted from Second Lieutenant June 22, 1898. 
Charles E. Parsons, . - - - Second Lieutenant 

Promoted from Sergeant. Commissioned July 2, 1898. 
Thomas Carney, ----- First Sergeant 

William E. Walker - - - Quartermaster-Sergeant 



SERGEANTS 



Charles M. Robinson, 
Henry Y. Lighthall, 



Frank Hoppman, 
Roy E. Brizee. 



CORPORALS 



E. W. Schermerhorn, 
Franklin P. Jackson, 
Paul M. Pelletreau, 
William M. Purman, 
Augustus C. Smith, 
Edward E. Yelverton, 

Albert F. 



A. C. Jackson, 
Philip A. B. Bellin, 
George E. Williams, 
Winfred H. Larkin, 
Fred L. Eisenmenger, 
James McDonald, 
Dillman. 



Charles H. Smith, Musician, 
Frederick W. Sherman, Musician, William H. Reed, Musician, 

James Roach, Artificer, Aaron Bradt, Wagoner. 



PRIVATES 



Alden, Clarence T. 
Amsler, Jacob 
Ayquoroyd, George 
Bates, Arthur O. 
Bernhard, David H. 
Blauel, Theodore C. 
Blood, John C. 
Bradt, Ira V. 
Brandow, Charles F. 
Brickner, Conrad 
Bronk, William J. 
Burhans, William N. 
Carpenter, William 
Clark, Walter G. 
Collette, George F. 
Conlon, Charles E. 
Cowles, John T., Jr. 



Hussong, George 
Kelly, Patrick H. 
Killian, John 
Knopka, Fred 
Lambert, James E. 
Lippman, Edward G. 
McCormick, Jarries F. 
McMullen, John J. 
Messmer, Ernest 
Metzger, Charles E. 
Metzger, William W. 
Maloney, Joseph F. 
Moore, Augustus Andrew 
Moran, John Henry 
Miller, William W. 
Myers, Charles L. 
Nolan, James M. 



SOLDIERS OF AMERICAN-SPANISH WAR. 



407 



Craig, Frederick M. 
Crane, Peter 
Crippen, Charles G. 
Cunningham, William J. 
Daniels, Charles H. 
Daniels, Frank H. 
Day, Frank H., Jr. 
DeReamer, Albert E. 
Dickson, Peter J. 
Duck, Thomas 
Dunbar, Garrett B. 
Eberle, Frank A. 
Eggleston, Edward 
Filers, Edward S. 
Fitzpatrick, Joseph J. 
Flanagan, George H. 
Fuller, Edward D. 
Gardiner, Herbert 
Glaser, Frederick 
Glennon, Michael 
Gregory, Alfred 
Guiltinan, James M. 
Herron, James H. 
Hoppman, Henry 
Horan, Jeremiah 
Hulbert, Charles N. 



O'Rourke, John F. 
Orr, Harry R. 
Page, Charles J. 
Peek, James 
Peters, DeWitt C. 
Pfender, Philip 
Seekins. Thomas E. 
Sheldon, Jerry 
Shook, Clarence 
Singhouse, Philip 
Smith, Abel 
Snyder, Christopher N. 
Speers, William J. 
Stafford, Abraham 
Steinert, Edward E. 
Stevens, Henry W. 
Still, Edwin Floyd 
Strobel, Conrad J. 
Toy, E. G. 
Vedder, Clyde J. 
Vedder, Henry S. 
Vedder, Leonard 
Wagner, David J. 
Waldron, Charles E. 
Walker, LeRoy E. 
Wortman, Howard P. 



ROLL OF COMPANY F, 

37TH Separate Company of Schenectady. 
Washington Continentals. 



Frank Bander, 
George W. Crippen, 
Albert Wells, 
Wayne R. Brown, 
William C. Yates, - 

Aubrey A. Ross, 
Fritz R. Champion, 



sergeants 



Captain 

First Lieutenant 

Second Lieutenant 

First Sergeant 

Quartermaster-Sergeant 

William Leedom, 
Roger G. Kinns. 



4o8 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



CORPORALS 



Jesse S. Button, 
William "S. Barriger, 
Ray Rowe, 
Edward Williams, 
Franciscus J. Baumler, 
George Boldt, 
William K. Wands, Musician, 
John H. Cross, Artificer, 

Allen, John W. 
Bancroft, Fred S. 
Banker, William 
Barry, George 
Berger, Henry E. 
Boldt, William 
Broughton, Charles A. 
Boyle, John H. 
Bo)ie, Thomas 
Bridgeman, Peter T. 
Burke, Clarence W. 
Castle, Willard A. 
Chadsey, LeRoy 
Clinton, Jacob S. 
Clowe, Earl 
Dolzen, Charles 
Eagan, Joseph F. 
Enders, Charles L. 
Fenton, William M. 
Ford, Harry B. 
Gabel, Fred W. 
Goetz, St. Elmo N. 
Gould, Henry W. 
Hall, Frank E. 
Hanley, Patrick F. 
Hallenbeck, Walter H. 
Hambridge, Edward 
Henry, Harry 



George C. Caw, 
Martin Hodges, 
Walter H. Todd, 
William Herzog, 
John W. Healey, 
Cyrus W. Rexford. 
Frank Reha, Musician, 
George J. Sells, Wagoner. 



PRIVATES 



Lubking, Frederick W. 
Luedemann, William F. 
Mallery, Arlington H. 
Mavvson, George H. 
McChesney, Frank 
McCready, William H. 
McDonald, Thomas W. 
Messmer, Charles P. 
Monges, Richard F. 
Nivison, William D. 
Ogden, James 
Penoyer, William H. 
Potter, William 
Powell, Albert A. 
Purcell, John A. 
Quackenbush, George 
Ralph, James 
Ragan, Lloyd E. 
Reed, Fred L. 
Richardson, Edward C. 
Robinson, Rodman H. 
Schermerhorn, Louis C. 
Schneider, Henry C. 
Shaw, John C. 
Safford, Ward E. 
Schiek, Frederick 
Sheffold, Delbert 
Sheffold. William A. 



SOLDIERS OF AMERICAN-SPANISH WAR. 



409 



Huber, Adolf 
Jones, Clinton 
Jones, John S. 
Jann, Victor 
Jandro, Elmer L. 
Juno, Duncan McD. 
Keating, Edward C. 
Kerber, John 
Kleiner, Emil 
Knowlton, Daniel H. 
Luckhurst, Judson B. 
Lovett, Lewis L. 
Lawyer, Otis 
Levey, Elmer E. 
Louder. Peter 



vStevenson, Porter C. 
Smith William A. 
Taylor, John 
Thorpe, James 
Thornton, Edward A. 
Tierney, James 
Tushingham, George W. 
Van Vranken, Charles 
Van Vranken, Stephen T. 
Warren, Clarence A. 
Warner, Frank M. 
Whitmyre, Clarence 
Whitstead, Edwin J. 
Young, Roy 



The editor deeply regrets that he is tmable to give the records of 
those who fought in the Philippines and in China. He has made 
every effort to ascertain who of Schenectady's sons engaged in two 
national contests, in which the United States won equal renown for 
bravery, humanity and the exercise not only of military skill, but of 
military diplomacy that is unsurpassed in all its history. He has 
advertised in the daily papers of Schenectady for information as to 
those who fought or suffered or died in these wars, and has received 
no response, and has never been able to obtain any information. It 
would be idle to attempt a search among the names of 446,000 
enrolled in the records of the War Department, to find the scattered 
few who did duty in the tropics. There are enough, however few, 
to deserve honorable mention in those two wars, but even the names 
of those few he has been unable to obtain. 



4IO SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

CHAPTER XXVII. 
Towns of the County. 

DuANESBURGH IS the most western town of Schenectady County, 
and is bounded on the north by Montgomery County, on the east by 
the town of Princetown, on the south by Schoharie and Albany 
Counties and on the west by vSchoharie County. Duanesburgh has an 
area of about 42,000 acres. Its form is irregular, and its situation 
elevated from 400 to 500 feet above the level of the Hudson at 
Albany. Its surface consists of upland broken by the narrow valleys 
and gullies of small streams. Schoharie Creek forms a small por- 
tion of the western boundary and Norman's Kill flows through the 
south part, entering the Hudson further down at a point about two 
and one-half miles below Albany. The Bozen Kill, one of the 
branches of Norman's Kill, is a picturesque stream on which is a fall 
of seventy feet. Corry's Brook and Chuctanunda Creek also do their 
part in draining the town. The hills which border these streams 
are steep and in some places rocky. The soil is a stiff clay loam 
with some intermixture of gravel. 

The products are various, but grass succeeds better than grain and 
the town is better adapted to pasturage than to tillage. During the 
late years, the principal crops cultivated have been hay, oats, pota- 
toes, buckwheat and rye. There are no fruits grown to speak of. 

Maria Pond and Featherstonhaugh Lake are two small sheets of 
water in the northeastern part of the town, about 250 feet above the 
canal. Maria Pond is about two miles in circumference and is a 
very beautiful lake during the summer. 

The Albany & Susquehanna Railroad extends through the 
southern part with a station at Quaker street. 

Duanesburgh was erected into a township by patent March 13, 
1765, but was first recognized as a town March 22, 1788. 

The first large tracts in what is now Duanesburgh were purchased 
by different parties. In 1737 Timothy Bagley made a purchase and 



TOWNS OF THE COUNTY. 411 

was followed in 1738 by A. P. and William Crosby, and in 1739 by 
Walter Bntler, Jonathan Brewster purchased a tract in 1770. These 
included about 60,000 acres, which, with the exception of about 
1,000 acres, known as Braine's Patent, came into the ownership of 
Hon. James Duane, either by inheritance from his father or by pur- 
chase. 

Actual settlement of the town did not begin until 1765, when the 
town was organized and Judge Duane contracted with about twenty 
German families from Pennsylvania to begin a settlement. Of these, 
sixteen families came and located permanently. Fifteen dollars per 
annum for each one hundred acres, payable in gold and silver, was 
the price paid for the renting of these lands. 

When Judge Duane withdrew from active life, he gave to the 
town a plot of ground ten acres in extent. This is called Center 
Square, and was designed as a common for the village of Duanes- 
burgh. Two churches, a school-house, and other buildings are situ- 
ated in the locality. 

Hon. James Duane, from whom the town was named, was born in 
New York City, February 6, 1733, and was a lawyer by profession. 
It is, however, as a high-toned patriot in the early part of the 
Revolutionary struggle that he came into prominent notice. He was 
a member of the First Provincial Congress that met at Philadelphia 
in 1774, and was associated with Patrick Henry, John Adams, John 
Jay, Richard Henry Franklin and other Revolutionary leaders. He 
was again elected to Congress in 1775, but in 1776 returned home to 
attend the New York Congress, of which he had been chosen a mem- 
ber from New York City. The object of this congress was to form 
a state government. 

In 1784 he was elected Mayor of New York City, which office he 
held for several years, and in March, 1789, he welcomed to that city 
the first Congress under the present Constitution, and General Wash- 
ington, as President of the Republic. In the same year President 
Washington appointed him United State Judge of the District of 
New York, which position he held until March, 1794, when he 
retired and removed to Schenectady. He intended to take up his 



412 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

residence in Duanesburgh, where he had already erected a church, but 
died suddenly on the morning- of February i, 1797. He was buried 
under Christ's Church, Duanesburgh. 

NiSKAYUNA was formed from Watervliet, Albany County, N. Y., 
]\Iarch 7, 1809, with a population of 681, and a part of Schenectady 
was annexed in 1853. Niskayuna contains 10,471 acres. 

The name of this town is derived from the term Nis-ti-go-wo-ne or 
Co-nis-ti-glo-no, the name by which it is known on the old maps. 
When the first white settlers arrived in the town, this place was 
occupied by a tribe of Indians known as Conistigione. 

Niskayuna lies on the Mohawk in the eastern part of the county. 
Its surface is mostly upland, terminating in steep bluffs upon the 
ri\er valley. The inter^^ales are very rich and productive. A strip 
of land about a mile west, extending back from the summits of the 
bluffs, has a hard clay soil, and a considerable portion of it is swampy 
and unfit for cultivation. Farther south the soil is sandy. 

Tradition has preserved a few of the following names of the chiefs 
of the Connestigiune tribe who inhabited this section of the country: 
Rcn-warrigh-woh-go-wa, (signifying in F^nglish, the great fault finder 
or grumbler), Ka-na-da-rokh-go-wa, (signifying a great eater), 
Rc-)a-na, (a chief), As-sa-ve-go, (big knife), and A-voon-ta-go-wa, (big 
tree). Of these, the first made the greatest objection to alienating 
lands to the whites and in each deed he was careful to have a cove- 
nant inserted by which the rights of hunting and fishing were pre- 
served to them. It was a common saying of his that " after the 
whites had taken possession of our lands, they will make Kaut-sore 
(literally spoon-food or soup) of our bodies." Yet he was on the 
most friendly terms" with the whites and was never backward in ex- 
tending to them his powerful influence and personal aid during their 
expedition against the Canadians in the French War. He took great 
delight in instructing the boys of the settlers in the arts of war and 
was constantly complaining that the government did not prosecute 
the war against the French with sufficient vigor. The council fire 
of the Connestigiune band was held about a mile south of the vil- 
lage. 



TOWNS OF THE CONNTY. 413 

In 1687, Niskayuna was visited by a spy from the Adirondack 
tribe, which was an ally of the French. Hunger drove him to the 
house of a Dutchman by the name of Van Brakle, where he de- 
voured an enormous quantity of the food set before him, which hap- 
pened to be pork and peas. Although his movements had been 
made with unusual caution, the eagle eye of the "Grumbler" 
detected him. He waylaid him on leaving the house of his enter- 
tainer and after a short conflict, killed him. Having severed the 
head of the corpse from the body, he repaired to the house of Van 
Brakle and threw the head into the window, exclaiming to the 
owner: " Behold the head of your pea eater." 

The first settlers of this town were an independent class of Hol- 
landers who located outside the manor line to avoid the conflicting 
exactions of the patrons and the trading government of the New 
Netherlands. It was settled at about the same time as was Schenec- 
tady. 

Among the early settlers were the Clutes, Van Vrankens, Vedders, 
Groots, Tymersons, Consauls, Pearses, Van Brookhovens, Claas, Jan- 
sen and Kriegers. 

From an old document it appears that Harmon Vedder obtained a 
patent for some land here in 1664. 

Captain Martin Kriegier, who was the first burgomaster of New 
Amsterdam, finally settled in Niskayuna, on the banks of the 
Mohawk, "where the Indians carry their canoes across the stones." 
In this retired and romantic spot, this brave soldier and just magis- 
trate died in the year 1712. 

GlEnvillE was named after Sanders Leenderste Glen, the original 
patentee. It was formed from the fourth ward of Schenectady, 
April 14, 1820, and is the only town in the county north of the 
Mohawk River. The country around Scotia was granted in 1665 to 
Glen, a native of Scotland, who moved to Holland in 1645, on 
account of religious persecution, and from there migrated to the New 
Netherlands. 

The greater part of the surface of the town is covered with a 
thick deposit of drift which consists principally of clay, with some 



414 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

outcrop of slate with hard pan in the southern and western parts 
and loam in the eastern. Generally, the underlying rock is the shale 
of the Hudson River group, which crops out in the valleys and the 
bottom of the rivers. 

The central and western parts are occupied by rugged and wooded 
hills rising abruptly from the valley of the river to a height of three 
hundred feet. The eastern part of the town is nearly level. The 
Mohawk intervales have been devoted to the culture of broom corn 
and are very fertile. 

The principal streams are : Crabskill, Chaugh-ta-noon-da, Alphlaata 
and Jan Wemp's Creeks and Verf Kill. Sander's Lake in Scotia is 
about a mile in circumference. 

On November 13, 1662, Van Slyck's Island was granted to Jacques 
Van Slyck and later a new grant was made to Jacques Cornelise and 
Jan Barentse Wemp. 

Hoffman's Ferry was established about 1790 by Harmanus Vedder 
and called Vedder's Ferry until 1835, when it was bought by John 
Hoffman, from whom it took its present name. 

Among the first settlers were the Glens, Sanderses, Veiles, Van 
Eppses, Ostrands, Tolls, Barhydts, Browns, Johnsons and Carpenters. 

The village of West Glenville is situated ten miles from Schenec- 
tady. It is in the northeast part of the town. East Glenville con- 
tains a Methodist Episcopal church and a lodge of Good Templars. 

High Mills is situated in the northeastern part of the town. At 
this place the town built a fine iron bridge across the Alplaat Creek. 

The village of Scotia lies between the Mohawk River and San- 
der's Lake and is about one-half mile from Schenectady.' Reesville 
was a suburb of Scotia, but the two places have grown together and 
are now known only as Scotia. Scotia, the ancient name of Scot- 
land, was the name given by its first settler. This village com- 
mences at a point nearly opposite the eastern extremity of the city 
and extends westward about two miles along the north side of the 
Mohawk. 

On November 3, 1865, the first patent was granted by Governor 
Richard Niccols to Sanders Leendertse Glen. 



TOWNS OF THE COUNTY. 415 

Princetown was formed March 20, 1798, from a portion of the 
patent of Schenectady, and from lands originally patented to George 
Ingoldsby and Aaron Bradt in 1737. This was subseqnently sold to 
William Corry, who formed a settlement which was long known as 
Corry's Bush. Afterwards Corry sold his interest to John Duncan. 
The town itself was named after John Prince of Schenectady, who 
was in the Assembly as a member from Albany County. Its surface 
consists of a broken upland gently descending towards the south- 
east, with a stiff argillaceous mould resting on a compact of ponder- 
ous hard-pan, with ledges of limestone, calcereous and silicious sand- 
stone argillite. 

The streams are Norman's Kill in the south, Piatt's Kill in the 
center, and Zantzee Kill in the northwest. Upon this stream is a 
cascade sixty feet high, and from this point to the Mohawk are 
numerous falls and cascades. 

The town contains 15,450 acres, and is an oblong square, ten and 
one-half miles long north and south, by two and one-half miles wide. 
It is located about seven .miles northwest of Schenectady and six- 
teen miles from Albany. It lies between the towns of Duanesburgh 
on the south and Rotterdam on the north, and is a little west from 
the center of the county. 

Kelly's Station is a small hamlet in the southeast corner of the 
town, eight miles south from Schenectady and three miles east from 
Duanesburgh's four corners. Giffords is a small hamlet about three 
miles northeast of Kelly's Station. Rynex Corners is eight miles 
west of Schenectady and on the line of the towns of Rotterdam and 
Princetown. 

Rotterdam was formed from Schenectady on April 14, 1820, and 
was formerly the Third Ward. Another part of the city was 
annexed in 1853, and a part taken from the town and added to the 
city in 1865. 

The town contains 24,422 1-2 acres, and lies near the center of the 
county upon the south bank of the Mohawk. The surface consists 
of a broken hilly region in the northwest, a level intervale extend- 
ing from the center towards the south, and a high plain on the east. 



4i6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Part of the soil upon the west hills is a tough clay underlaid by 
shale. The central valley or plain, five miles in extent, was named 
by the Dutch the bouwlandts, or farm lands. The soil is a deep 
alluvial. The east plateau is sandy and has formerly been regarded 
as barren, but of late years has shown itself adapted for orchards 
and especially for small fruits. 

In the summer of 1661, Arant Van Curler, leader of the first 
settlement, made application to Governor Stuyvesant for permission 
to settle upon the great flats lying west of Schenectady. 

Broom corn was first introduced into this town by the Shakers of 
Water\diet and Niskayuna, and is now one of the most extensive 
products of the soil. Mr. Martin De Forrest of Schenectady says he 
well remembers the first piece of broom corn planted in Rotterdam, 
near the city of Schenectady by the Shakers from Watervliet. It 
attracted much attention and its peculiar adaption to this alluvial 
soil soon brought it into general cultivation. Mr. Sanders Van Eps, 
then an extensive farmer in Rotterdam, was one of the first to raise 
it in large quantities and to manufacture it into brooms. 



CHAPTER XXVIII. 

The History of Union College. 

[Written especially for this work by Rev. Andrew V. V. Raymond, D. D., 
President of the College.] 

Education was one of the accepted and fundamental principles of 
the new civilization which began with the planting of the American 
colonies. With the early struggle for subsistence, in the face of dis- 
couragements and dangers, one college after another was founded in 
the then wilderness. These institutions nourished the spirit of 
liberty which came to final expression in American independence. 

The valleys of the Mohawk and Hudson were settled for the most 
part by immigrants from Holland, and it may seem strange, know- 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 417 

ing as we do the devotion of the Dutch to sound learning, that their 
colonies were not among the first to establish a school of higher 
education. Why is there not a college in this vicinity as old, at 
least, as Harvard ? A single fact will account for this. 

The American college began as a training school for Christian 
ministers. It may be doubted if one of the earlier colleges would 
have been founded but for the pressure of this necessity. Puritanism 
had broken with the church of England, and so with the great 
English universities, and therefore it must train its own religious 
teachers. 

No such necessity was laid upon the Dutch colonists, and for at 
least a hundred years after the founding of New Amsterdam and 
Fort Orange it was the settled policy of the Dutch either to bring 
their ministers directly from Holland, or to send their youth to Hol- 
land to be educated. The Dutch church in America was a compo- 
nent part of the church of the mother country ; and when at last it 
became independent under the leadership of Dr. John Livingston, it 
at once established its own " School of the Prophets," Queen's Col- 
lege, now Rutger's, at New Brunswick, N. J. This one institution, 
almost synchronous in its origin with King's College, now Columbia, 
in New York City, was for years abundantly sufficient for all the 
needs of the Dutch colonists. But while the War of the Revolution 
was still in progress, a movement was begun by the people of 
Northern and Eastern New York, looking to the establishment of a 
higher institution of learning, which should meet the needs of the 
growing settlements along the Hudson and Mohawk ; not the needs 
represented supremely by the church, but by the new national life 
just awakening. It is worthy of emphasis that this was the distin- 
guishing feature of the movement that led at last to the founding 
of Union College. We need not hesitate to say that Union College 
was more than any other institution in our land, the outgrowth of 
national life and national feeling, and, to a very marked degree, the 
college has been true in all her history to this national spirit. The 
movement to which reference has been made began in 1779, with a 
petition to the governor and legislature of the state, signed by 850 
citizens of Albany and Tryon Counties, and 140 citizens of Charlotte 



4i8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

County, now Washington, to found a college in Schenectady, to be 
called Clinton College in honor of George Clinton, the governor. 

The preamble of the charter as then proposed reads as follows : 

" Whereas a great number of respectable inhabitants of Albany, 
Tryon and Charlotte, taking into consideration the great benefit of a 
good education, the disadvantages they now labor under for want of 
the means of acquiring it, and the loud call there now is and no 
doubt will be in a future day for men of learning to fill the various 
offices of church and state ; and looking upon the town of Schenec- 
tady in every respect the most suitable and commodious seat for a 
seminary of learning in this state, or perhaps in America, have pre- 
sented their humble petition to the governor and legislature of this 
state, earnestly requesting that a number of gentlemen may be in- 
corporated in a body politic, who shall be empowered to erect an 
academy or college in the place aforesaid, to hold sufficient funds for 
its support, to make proper laws for its government, and to confer 
degrees." 

The legislature was then in session at Kingston, and the petitions 
were referred to a committee, which reported favorably about two 
months later, October 20th, 1779, and recommended that the peti- 
tioners be allowed to bring in a bill at the next session. This was 
not done, however, for the reason, doubtless, that the emergencies of 
the war diverted attention from the project. 

But three years later, or in 1782, another petition, signed by 
1,200 was presented to the legislature, still sitting at Kingston. It 
was the closing year of the war, when all was confusion, and no 
decisive action was taken by the legislature. 

The petition called for the creation of a corporate body by execu- 
tive act. This may have raised the question which resulted in 1786 
in the creation of the Board of Regents of the University of the 
State of New York, with authority to grant charters to colleges and 
academies, so that the college in Schenectady may be said to be, in 
an indirect way, the origin of the Board of Regents, or the entire 
educational system of the state. 

Early failures, however, did not discourage the friends of educa- 
tion. In 1784 the Rev. l)irck Romeyn became pastor of the 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 419 

Reformed Church in Schenectady. A man of ripe scholarship and of 
aggressive energy, he threw himself at once with great enthusiasm 
into the movement, and became the leader to whom more than to 
any other one man final success was due. He first organized an 
academy in Schenectady in 1785, and this academy became the visi- 
ble representative of the struggling cause. Dr. Romeyn seemed to 
realize the strategic importance of fostering an educational institu- 
tion, even though it fell far short of their dreams and desires. And, 
without doubt, the existence of this academy determined finally the 
location of the college in Schenectady. 

That the academy was regarded only as a means to a higher end, 
appears from an interesting letter written by Dr. John H. Livingston 
to his friend, Dr. Dirck Romeyn, in the winter of 1785-86. He says : 
" If I can be serviceable to you in anything relating thereto ( L e.^ to 
the college project ) I shall be glad to receive your directions," and 
in another letter, dated February 25th, 1786, he writes : " I shall be 
happy to hear from you, and wish to know what prospects remain of 
our sanguine expectations respecting your intended college. I have 
understood some little misunderstanding has taken place in conse- 
quence of different claims to the same lands which were intended to 
be appropriated for a fund. I hope it may be amicably settled. It 
would doubtless prove a great advantage to the town to have a col- 
lege placed there, and its importance to literature and religion in 
that quarter of our state need not be mentioned." From this time, 
1786, almost every year brought some petition to the legislature, 
either for the academy, or for the longed-for college. One of these 
petitions, asking that power might be given by law to three or more 
of the petitioners to purchase 15,360 acres of land from the Oneida 
Indians at a nominal price for the benefit of a university, was 
referred to a committee of the legislature, which reported as follows : 

" That if it would not be derogatory to the interests of the state, 
the prayer of the petitioners ought to be granted. Therefore, 
resolved, that it would be derogatory to the interests of the state to 
grant the prayer of the petitioners. N. B. " Interest " in this 
report means dignity, honor, interest, peace and public faith. 
Rejected and etided." 



420 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

In a memorial dated February 29th, 1792, the proprietors of the 
academy state that they had at that time about ei.2:hty students in 
the English language, and nearly twenty pursuing the study of the 
learned languages and higher branches, in preparation for the first or 
more advanced classes in college. They were fully convinced of 
their ability to establish and maintain a college. As a foundation 
for their fund, the town of Schenectady was willing to convey to the 
trustees of a college, as soon as they were appointed, a tract of land 
containing 5,000 acres. A pledge of 700 acres more was offered 
from individuals, and a subscription of nearly ^1,000. The Con- 
sistory of the Dutch church olTered to give a building called the 
" Academy," worth ^1,500, and ^250 for a library. In this memo- 
rial we find another name for the college suggested, viz.: "the Col- 
lege of Schenectady." 

The application, however, was denied on the grounds that 
sufficient funds had not been provided. The academy continued to 
prosper, and one year later, in 1793, had 128 students, of whom 
thirty-eight were pursuing the classical languages and other higher 
branches. 

The next petition was for a charter for the academy, and this was 
granted January 29th, 1793 ; but an effort to obtain a college charter 
one year later failed, because the state of literature in the academy 
did not appear to be far enough advanced, nor its funds sufficient to 
warrant its erection into a college. We must regard with special 
gratification this jealous guarding of the degree-conferring power in 
the early days of our commonwealth. It is all the more noticeable 
in view of the easy indifference with which this power has been 
granted in more recent years. Far from being dismayed by their 
repeated failures, the promoters of the college movement gathered 
their forces for another effort, which finally proved successful. 

At a meeting of the Board of Trustees of the academy upon the 
19th day of August, 1794, the board appointed Stephen Van 
Rensselaer, Jeremiah Van Rensselaer, John Saunders, Nicholas 
Veeder, Stephen N. Bayard, Joseph C. Yates and John Taylor a com- 
mittee to digest and report a plan for a college to be established in 
the town of Schenectady, and instructed the committee to form the 




■.na iif_c ^ ^U/ra-ns &Br<7-jVy 




r • f 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 421 

plan upon the most liberal principles, so as to remove the objections 
offered by the Regents. This committee met on the 17th day of 
September, and after full discussion, resolved : 

1. "That public utility, liberality of sentiment and entire exclu- 
sion of all party whatsoever ought to be attended in forming a plan 
for a college ; and 

2. That in order to render the business more extensive, and to 
collect the sentiment of others, this committee will meet at Albany 
upon the nth day of November next, and invite a number of gen- 
tlemen of information in the city of Albany to unite with them in 
carrying the business of their appointment into effect." 

This adjourned meeting was held at the house of James McGourk, 
and was attended by representatives, not only from the city of 
Albany, but from the northern and western parts of the state. Jere- 
miah Van Rensselaer presided, and a general outline of a plan for a 
college was agreed upon, and a committee appointed to perfect the 
plan, and report at a subsequent meeting to be held on the i6th day 
of December. This committee consisted of John Taylor, Joseph C. 
Yates, Stephen N. Bayard, John Saunders, Simeon DeWitt, Himloke 
Woodruff, John V. Henry and William Pitt Beers. 

Another committee, composed of John Lansing, Jr., Jeremiah Van 
Rensselaer and Peter Gansevoort, Jr., was appointed to draw a circu- 
lar letter to be printed and distributed through the northern and 
western parts of the state, inviting prominent gentlemen to this 
December meeting. 

The meeting was held according to agreement, again at the house 
of James McGourk, when the full text of the appeal to the Regents 
was agreed upon. In this appeal an elaborate plan for the college 
was proposed, covering the organization and government of the 
Board of Trustees, the constitution of the faculty, the range of 
studies, the fees of students, and the salaries of the professors. The 
curriculum was to include the Latin and Greek languages and anti- 
quities, mathematics, natural philosophy and astronomy, geography, 
rhetoric, logic and the Belles-Lettres, history, chronology, moral 
philosophy and natural jurisprudence. The matriculation fee was to 

28 



422 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

be two and a half dollars, tuition sixteen dollars per year, and gradu- 
ation fee six dollars. The president's salary must be not less than 
$750, and a professor's salary not less than $500. No president or 
professor being a minister of the Gospel could assume pastoral 
charge of a church. 

One reason for the failure of earlier efforts was undoubtedly the 
jealousy of other cities or towns. Various places were advocated by 
interested citizens : Hudson, Poughkeepsie, Kingston, Lansingburgh, 
Waterford and even Stillwater, but the most formidable opposition 
came naturally from x\lbany. As early as January 4th, 1792, the 
Common Council of Albany voted to convey a part of the public 
square for the use of a college, provided that a charter could be 
obtained, and a committee was appointed to secure subscriptions. 
Efforts were increased when Albany learned of the activity of 
Schenectady in the fall of 1794. A meeting was held in the City 
Hall of Albany on the last day of that year for taking measures 
toward securing a charter for Albany College, and when Schenec- 
tady's petition came before the Board of Regents in January, 1795, 
it jostled against another from Albany proposing two acres for build- 
ings and $50,000 in money. 

It would be interesting to know the considerations which con- 
trolled the decision of the Board of Regents as between these rival 
claimants to the honor of a college site. It is not difficult to dis- 
cover some of the determining factors in the case. First, the lack of 
enthusiasm in Albany as compared with Schenectady. There was 
no such hearty unanimity in that city indicative of the longing for an 
educational institution that made the people of Schenectady one in 
their efforts, year after year. After reading the whole story of the 
contest one is convinced that Albany was not so eager for a college 
because of what the college represented, as she was eager to keep 
the college from going to Schenectady ; and so her efforts were spas- 
modic, and she became thoroughly aroused only when she saw her 
rival about to succeed. 

Then it must not be forgotten that some leading Albanians 
honestly favored Schenectadv, as shown by the meetings held at the 
residence of Mr. McGourk. After Dr. Dirck Romeyn, the men most 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 423 

prominent in the college movement were General Philip Schuyler 
and Governor George Clinton, and both advocated the Schenectady 
site. It was doubtless their influence that turned the scale in favor 
of the smaller city ; but the importance of Dr. Romeyn's influence 
is very pleasantly set forth in an interesting letter written to his son, 
the Rev. John B. Romeyn, by Governor DeWitt Clinton, as follows : 

" When the legislature met in New York about thirty years ago, 
your excellent father attended the Regents of the university to 
solicit the establishment of a college at Schenectady. Powerful 
opposition was made at Albany. I was the secretary of the univer- 
sity and I had the opportunity of observing the characters of the 
men concerned in this application, and the whole of its progress to 
ultimate success. I have no doubt that the weight and respectability 
of your father's character procured a decision in favor of Schenec- 
tady. Governor George Clinton and General Schuyler, almost 
always in opposition to each other, united on this question. I had 
frequent occasion from my official position to see your father. There 
was something in his manner peculiarly dignified and benevolent, 
calculated to create veneration as well as affection, and it made an 
impression on my mind that will never be erased." 

The month of February, 1795, witnessed the final triumph of a 
cause which had found its first popular expression sixteen years 
before. Upon the 8th of that month the trustees were named, and 
upon the 25th the full text of the charter was ratified by the Regents. 
The news of the granting of this charter was received in Schenec- 
tady with every manifestation of delight. I quote from the address 
of Mr. Sweetman at the semi-centennial celebration. As he was a 
member of the first class graduating, he was an eye-witness of what 
he describes. 

" The old brick academy on the corner of Union and Ferry 
streets resounded with the tidings of success, and the night following 
the windows were well studded with candles, and at a concerted sig- 
nal all instantly in a blaze ; the little bell on top of the house jing- 
ling most merrily ; the interior filled with happy boys, and the 
streets crowded with sympathizing spectators. Had you been there, 



424 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

you would have witnessed a joyful night, when the academy was 
metamorphosed into Union College." 

Mr. Sweetman describes what interested him most as a student, 
the academy being the center of the whole scene, but the chronicles 
of the day speak of the whole town given over to rejoicing, a general 
display of flags, the ringing of all the bells, bonfires, and a great 
illumination. 

And so began the life of this historic institution. The first 
trustees were: Robert Yates, Abram Yates, Jr., Abraham Ten 
Broeck, Goldsbrow Banyar, John V. Henry, George Merchant, 
Stephen Van Rensselaer, John Glen, Isaac Vrooman, Joseph C. 
Yates, James Shuter, Nicholas Veeder, James Gordon, Beriah Palmer, 
Samuel Smith, Henry Walton, Ammi Rodgers, Aaron Condict, 
Jacobus V. C. Romeyn, James Cochran, John Frey, D. Christopher 
Pick, Jonas Piatt and Jonas Coe. 

Of these, seven resided in Albany, six in Schenectady, three in 
Ballston, and one each in Saratoga, Troy, Kinderhook, Palatine, 
Herkimer, and Whitestown, N. Y., and Hackensack, N. J. 

By the terms of the final petition for the charter, a majority of 
the Board of Trustees could not belong to any one religious denom- 
ination, and this led to the selection of the name " Union College " 
as expressing the intention of uniting all religious sects in a com- 
mon interest for the common good by offering equal advantages to 
all, with preference to none. The purpose was to found an institu- 
tion upon the broad basis of Christian unity, and this idea has ever 
since been faithfully followed in the spirit of the original intention, 
no particular religious denomination having at any time claimed, or 
attempted to control its management, or to influence the choice of 
trustees or faculty. It is believed that this was the first college in 
the United States not confessedly denominational in its character ; 
and in this respect, as in many others. Union College was a pioneer 
in the educational world. 

But the non-sectarianism of the college was only one way of 
emphasizing the fact, to which allusion has already been made, the 
distinctively national character of the institution. The state recog- 
nized no religious creed as of supreme authority, neither should the 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 425 

college created especially to serve the state. Still the college, 
like the state, should be distinctively Christian in its spirit and aims. 

A few months after the granting of the charter, the trustees of 
the Schenectady Academy transferred their property to the trustees 
of the college, and the latter body completed the organization of the 
college, on the 19th day of October, 1795, by the election of the 
Rev. John Blair Smith, D. D., of Philadelphia, as president, John 
Taylor, A. M., the principal of the old academy, as professor of 
mathematics, and the Rev. Andrew Yates as professor of Greek and 
Latin. 

A glance at the social and economic conditions under which the 
infant college began its life may prove of interest. 

Schenectady numbered less than 3,000 inhabitants. It was thor- 
oughly, conspicuously, desperately Dutch. Many of the houses were 
built of bricks brought from Holland, and all had their gable ends 
toward the street. Dutch was the language of the home and the 
market-place, and Dutch also were the hospitality to strangers, the 
love of liberty, the simplicity of life, public and private virtues. 

The great festivals of the year were Christmas, when Santa Claus 
came, Paas and Pinxter. There were a few families of wealth and 
prominence, but the great majority lived in comfort if not in luxury. 
Poverty and wretchedness, as seen to-day, were almost unknown. 
There were few demoralizing influences to greet the youth leaving 
the restraints of home for the larger freedom of college life. 
Although nearly as old as Albany or New York, Schenectady was 
virtually in 1795 a frontier town. Beyond it to the west all was 
wilderness with here and there a little settlement, as at Cherry 
Valley, Cooperstown, Palatine and Fort Stanwix, now Utica. But 
the beautiful and fertile valley of the Mohawk had already begun to 
attract immigrants, and the population along the river increased 
rapidly. For all the ambitious youth of this region the new college 
held out its arms, and its accessibility was a large factor in determin- 
ing the prosperity which came a few years later. In retnrn it sent 
back to the growing villages young men trained for professional and 
public life, and so contributed largely, from the earliest years, to the 
intelligence and public spirit which have made this the Empire State. 



426 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

But to return to the college itself. Its beginning was feeble. For 
the first two or three years barely a score of students all told were in 
attendance. Nevertheless, confidence in the future never wavered 
and enthusiasm never failed. At the first commencement in 1797, 
three seniors only were graduated ; but the occasion was one of 
rejoicing, and was deemed of sufficient importance to draw many 
distinguished visitors from a distance. The exercises were held in 
the Reformed Church, then standing in the middle of Albany street, 
now State street. To quote from one of the graduates of that day 
in his address fifty years later : 

" There within its massive and venerable walls, sparingly receiving 
the light through the small squares of glass, on a cloudy and chilly 
day, the first Wednesday in May, 1797, was celebrated the first Com- 
mencement of Union College. But it was May Day and the spring 
time of Union College ; not the dog-days of later years, when we are 
sweltering with heat and panting for air. And we talked of flowers 
and zephyrs and the loveliness of the renovating year. The number 
of graduates was few indeed, only three. The house was filled to 
overflowing. Amongst other distinguished citizens Governor Jay 
and Stephen Van Rensselaer, lieutenant-governor, were present. Dr. 
Smith, the president, acquitted himself to admiration. His parting 
address to the graduates was pointed, parental, affectionate. The 
whole audience was moved, and when he turned to speak of the 
future, he lifted the assembl}- to new thoughts and prospects of 
Union College, when it should rise with the rising countr>^, increase 
its numbers, extend its influence, acquire a name, win the confidence 
of the community, and command the respect and patronage of the 
state." 

From these words, it is evident that President Smith shared the 
popular confidence in the future of the college. He was a man of 
experience in educational work, having been president of Hampden 
Sidney College in Virginia, although he came to Union College from 
a Philadelphia pastorate. The rigors of our northern climate proved, 
however, too severe for his health, and he resigned the presidency in 
1799, to return to his former charge. He was succeeded the same 
year by Jonathan Edwards, the younger, who brought the prestige of 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 427 

a great name with character and ability that promised to add to its 
greatness ; but after two years of service, marked by the steady 
growth of the college, he died suddenly, and was succeeded in 1801, 
by the Rev. Jonathan Maxcy, a graduate and president of Brown 
University, and a Baptist, while his two predecessors had been grad- 
uates of Princeton, and were Presbyterians, thus confirming practi- 
cally the undenominational character of the institution. Dr. Maxcy's 
term of service was also brief, as he resigned in 1804, to accept the 
presidency of South Carolina College. 

The story of these early years should include a brief financial 
statement, especially as this illustrates the relations between the 
college and the state. 

The trustees of the town of Schenectady gave originally $20,301 60 
Other gifts in land and money by citizens of Albany, 

Schenectady and other places fram 1795 to 1798 16,213 50 
The State Legislature appropriated in 1795, for books 

and apparatus . . . . 3,750 00 

In 1796 for building . . . _ 10,000 00 

In 1797 for salaries for two years - - - 1,500 00 

In the years from 1797 to 1804, ^o^ various purposes 62,862 13 



Total of all gifts to the college from 1795 to 1804 $114,677 23 

The amount seems large for that early day, and doubtless was, but 
it should be remembered that much of this was in unproductive 
lands and $56,000 had gone into the new college building, leaving a 
very small sum for income-bearing investment. So that in reality 
the college was seriously crippled financially. 

But the most significant part of the above statement is the almost 
annual appropriation from the legislature, showing that Union Col- 
lege was at the beginning practically a state institution, thus giving 
evidence that at that day the relation of sound learning to the 
general welfare was appreciated. It may be questioned whether the 
state ever spent money more wisely than when it thus fostered the 
beginning of the institution that has given back to it and to the 
nation more than 6,000 educated men, whose characters and talents 



428 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

have contributed much to the development of American civilization. 
It is generally admitted that no college in our land has during the 
same period sent forth a larger proportion of broad-minded and 
public-spirited citizens, who became leaders of men. 

In 1804 we come upon the determining event in the life of the 
college. The Rev. Eliphalet Nott, pastor of the First Presbyterian 
Church of Albany, was called to the presidency, and held the office 
until his death in 1866, or for a period of sixty-two years, the longest 
presidential term in the history of American colleges. Dr. Nott 
made Union College. The story of his administration is the story 
of the progress of the institution from weakness and obscurity to a 
position second to none among the colleges of our land. A man of 
vigorous intellect, of limitless resources, of marvelous tact, of broad 
sympathies, of imposing figure and an inspiring personality, he 
brought all of his remarkable endowments to the service of the col- 
lege. Students gathered about him in increasing numbers. From 
fifteen in 1804, the Senior class numbered fifty-nine in 1814, ninety 
in 1824, 105 in 1834, reaching the maximum 162 in i860. In 1845 
at the close of the first fifty years of its life Union College had sent 
forth nearly one-half as many graduates as Harvard College in all 
her history of two hundred years. 

Dr. Nott was pre-eminently a judge of men, and surrounded him- 
self with teachers of recognized ability. The faculty contained such 
men as Francis Wayland, afterwards president of Brown University; 
Alonzo Potter, afterwards Bishop of Pennsylvania ; Andrew Yates, 
Robert Proudfit, Tayler Lewis, Isaac W. Jackson, William M. 
Gillespie and John P^'oster. 

The original site of the college was the northeast corner of Union 
and Ferry streets, and its home the old academy building. In 1796 
a new and larger site was secured further east on Union street 
between the present Erie Canal and North College street. A build- 
ing was erected which doubtless seemed ample for all possible needs 
of the new institution, but under Dr. Nott's vigorous management 
it soon became evident that more room was needed. And with 
characteristic foresight and ambitious purpose he secured a tract of 
several hundred acres on the rising ground east of the city, and in 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE 429 

1 81 3 the work of transforming this wilderness into a beautiful and 
commanding college domain was begun under the direction of 
Jacques Ramee, a French landscape architect, who had been em- 
ployed by the United States government in laying out the city of 
Washington. Mr. Ramee prepared an elaborate plan which included 
not only the artistic treatment of the grounds, but also the grouping 
of the buildings and even the designs of the buildings. This 
accounts for the fact which has been often noted that Union College 
alone, among our older institutions of learning, shows the early 
adoption of a consistent and comprehensive plan, and that the 
characteristic features of this plan are essentially foreign. There is 
a suggestion of an old world convent or monastery in both the archi- 
tecture and arrangement of the buildings. The original plan, bear- 
ing the date 18 13, and the signature of Jacques Ramee, was discov- 
ered in Paris as recently as 1890 by Mr. W. E. Benjamin, a graduate 
of the college, who secured it and brought it to America, where it 
came into the possession of R. C. Alexander, a trustee of the college, 
and by him was presented to the college. 

With removal to its new site, the college assumed a dignity and a 
relative importance which led almost at once to a large increase in 
the number of students, and from that date to the beginning of the 
Civil War, Union was generally recognized as among the three or 
four leading institutions of the country. The name of Dr. Nott 
became known throughout the land, and his genius as an educator 
commanded attention and inspired confidence. His liberal policy 
provoked wide-spread discussion, and while it aroused opposition, it 
also gained favor. For the privilege of graduating at Union, many 
students left other colleges at the end of the Sophomore or Junior 
year, and completed their course under Dr. Nott, so that for many 
years the upper classes at Union were larger than the lower. It has 
been said so often that it is commonly believed that these upper 
classes were recruited largely from students expelled from other 
institutions. It is true that Dr. Nott welcomed such students, 
believing that every man should be given a second chance, and the 
result in almost every instance justified his course, but the number 
who came in this way was relatively small. The great majority 



430 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

came from choice, attracted by the fame of the college, and especially 
by the great reputation of its president, as a practical educator. His 
aggressive independence was shown in many ways. He was the first 
to recognize the value of the study of modern languages, the first to 
anticipate the importance of a knowledge of the natural sciences 
and of technical training. As early as 1833 a scientific course was 
introduced running parallel for three years with the classical course, 
and in 1845 a course in civil engineering was established. In this, 
as in other respects. Union College became a pioneer, blazing the 
way which nearly all our educational institutions have since taken. 

Another influence contributing to the popularity and growth of 
the college in the first half of the last century was the development of 
student fraternities. To-day they represent much of the charm of 
undergraduate life, and occupy a field of increasing influence and 
importance, recognized by all but a few of our colleges. To Union 
belongs the distinction of originating the fraternity system and 
founding the oldest and best known of the Greek letter fraternities : 
Kappa Alpha, in 1825; Sigma Phi, in 1827; Delta Phi, in 1828; 
Psi Upsilon, in 1833; Chi Psi, in 1841, and Theta Delta Chi, in 
1847. '^^^ sympathy of the authorities with these social and literary 
organizations drew many students from other colleges in the days 
when their aims and methods were misunderstood, and the element of 
secrecy led to repressive measures. 

The financial history of Dr. Nott's administration is too compli- 
cated to be reviewed in detail within the limits of this article. At a 
time when the accepted ethical standards permitted the use of the 
lottery, many educational and religious institutions sought this 
means of raising money. Among them was Union Colle.2:e, which 
received from the legislature from time to time lottery grants for 
various amounts aggregating $280,000. The largest of these was a 
grant for $200,000 which passed the legislature in 1814. This 
amount, however, was not immediately realized, and the failure of 
the agents originally appointed to conduct the lottery led Dr. Nott 
to assume, eventually, the entire responsibility, and through his 
efficient management the college finally received the aid which the 
state had intended to give. For his services he was entitled to a 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 431 

commission, but how much he received was never known, as no 
report was required by the legislature, and none was given. This 
led, many years later, to the preferment of charges against the presi- 
dent of the college, and the legislature appointed an investigating 
committee. Before their report came up for final action, Dr. Nott 
carried out his long standing purpose and made over to the college 
what was practically his entire private fortune. This was so largely 
in excess of any amount that he could have received from the man- 
agement of the lotteries, that it silenced his detractors and vindicated 
his private character, as well as his unselfish devotion to the college 
with which his name had then been associated for half a century. 
From the beginning of the presidency, the finances of the college 
had been virtually under his direct personal control, and it was well 
understood that he made no distinction between the income of the 
college and his personal income, but freely drew from the latter to 
meet educational needs as they arose. He was not only a shrewd 
business man, but an inventor, and some of his inventions, notably 
his stoves, brought large financial returns. His own fortune, as well 
as the funds of the college, had been invested in Long Island City 
real estate. All of these large holdings became the property of the 
college, and under favorable conditions would have proved of 
immense value, but even the genius of Dr. Nott could not foresee 
the course of Long Island City politics, which encouraged all that is 
objectionable in city life, to the serious impairment of real estate 
values. Notwithstanding this opposing influence, the Long Island 
City property proved an available asset for the support of the college 
for many years. It was sold in 1897 for $1,100,000, a sum sufficient, 
after the payment of debts, to cover all the funds which from first to 
last had been invested in the property. 

After serving for nearly fifty years, and when approaching his 
eightieth birthday. Dr. Nott felt it advisable to share in some measure 
the executive responsibility, and the Rev. Laurens P. Hickok, D. D., 
was called from Auburn Theological Seminary to the office of vice 
president of the college ; but although this led to a division of labor, 
Dr. Nott remained the actual as well as the nominal head of the col- 
lege until his death in 1866, at the advanced age of 93 years. 



432 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The effect of the Civil War was seriously felt during the close of 
his administration, and there is abundant 'reason for the claim that 
Union suffered more than any other northern college during that 
period of strife. The college had always been popular in the south, 
and in i860 nearly every southern state was represented among the 
undergraduates. All of these students left with the outbreak of 
hostilities, and at the same time many of their friends and class- 
mates from the north answered the call of President Lincoln for 
volunteers. The story has often been told of the company that was 
drilled daily on the college campus by the Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages, Colonel Peissner, who afterwards fell at Chancellorsville. Of 
the students who left for the war only a few returned to complete 
their course. Among these was Harrison E. Webster, who later 
became the president of the college. 

But the Civil War was not alone responsible for the loss of 
students, and with it the loss of prestige, during this period. The 
college missed the vigorous leadership of the man who had so long 
conducted its affairs with autocratic power. At the very time when a 
clear brain and a strong will were most needed, they were lacking. 
Dr. Nott was still president, but with the increasing infirmities of 
extreme old age his masterful spirit was broken. Upon his death in 
1866, Dr. Hickok, the vice-president, succeeded to the office of 
president, but two years later he resigned in accordance with a pur- 
pose he had long entertained to withdraw from administrative work 
when he had reached the age of sevent}'. The Rev. Charles A. 
Aiken, D. D., of Princeton College, was chosen to fill the vacancy, 
but his tenure of ofhce was also brief, as for domestic reasons he 
resigned in 187 1. 

The influences already indicated had worked disastrously for the 
college. From i860, when the largest class in the history of the 
college was graduated, the number of students had steadily decreased, 
until in 1872 the graduating class was the smallest since the earliest 
years of Dr. Nott's administration. Evidently the time had come 
for some decided change, arid the trustees called to the presidency 
the Rev. EHphalet Nott Potter, a grandson of Dr. Nott, and a son 
of the Bishop of Pennsylvania, who had been for many years a 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 433 

professor in the college. Dr. Potter was then in the fnll vigor of 
young manhood, of commanding presence, and endowed with many 
attractive personal qualities. The task before him was difficult in 
the extreme, but he addressed himself to it with characteristic 
earnestness and zeal, and soon enlisted the practical support of many 
powerful friends. Unfortunately, however, he aroused opposition 
also, and after thirteen years of service he resigned to accept the 
presidency of Hobart College. Early in his administration Dr. 
Potter conceived the idea of associating the professional schools in 
Albany with the college in Schenectady, and in 1873 the Albany 
Medical College, the Albany Law School, the Dudley Observatory 
and LTnion College were brought together under the corporate title 
of Union University, and in 18S1, the Albany College of Pharmacy 
was organized as another department of the university. 

To President Potter is also due the credit of restoring to the col- 
lege the patronage of southern students. Funds which he secured 
for this special purpose enabled him to offer financial aid to those 
who had been impoverished by the war, and a steadily increasing 
number availed themselves of the educational advantages thus 
brought within their reach. Those who came were almost without 
exception representatives of old southern families, and their presence 
did much to revive the spirit and traditions of former times. In 
addition to these important services, President Potter increased the 
material equipment of the college by the erection of the Powers 
Memorial Plall and the Nott Memorial Building, the latter the most 
imposing structure on the college grounds. 

After President Potter's resignation in 1885, the Hon. Judson S. 
Landon, Justice of the Supreme Court, and a member of the board 
of trustees, acted as president ad interim for four years, or until the 
office was filled in 1889, by the election of Professor Harrison E. 
Webster, of the University of Rochester. Dr. Webster had formerly 
been connected with the faculty of Union College, and was extremely 
popular among the younger alumni, who rallied enthusiastically to 
his support, and the college at once responded to the quickening 
influence. The classes again increased in numbers, and signs of 
renewed prosperity multiplied, but President Webster, who had suf- 



434 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

fered for years from the results of his early campaigns as a soldier, 
found his health unequal to the responsibilities which he had 
assumed, and so tendered his resignation in January, 1893. The 
trustees, however, were unwilling to accept his resignation at that 
time, and gave him leave of absence for travel and rest in the hope 
that his strength might be restored. In this, however, they were 
disappointed, and when in January, 1894, his resignation was again 
before them, it was accepted. He was succeeded by the Rev. 
Andrew V. V. Raymond, an alumnus of the college of the class of 
1875, who was called to the presidency from the pastorate of the 
Fourth Presbyterian Church of Albany, and formally entered upon 
the office at the Commencement in June, 1894. 

The following year the college celebrated its centennial anniver- 
sary. This was an occasion of exceptional interest, and brought 
together hundreds of alumni and many distinguished educators, 
representing all of the older and many of the younger institutions of 
learning in the east. Preparations for this important event had been 
carried on by various committees for two years, and the exercises 
covered four days, beginning with Sunday, June 23, 1895. The 
nature and scope of the celebration are shown by the following 
program which was carried out in every particular : 

PROGRAM OF THE 

cp:ntennial celebration 

OF Union College 

AND THE 

Commencement Exercises 

OF THE 

Class of 1895. 



Sunday, June 23. 
morning service. 

First Reformed Church, 10.30 a. m. 

Sermon by the Rev. George Alexander, D. D., '66, pastor of the University Place 

Presbyterian Church of New York City. 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 435 

AFTERNOON SERVICE. 
First Reformed Church, 4.00 p. m. 
Conference, "Religion and Education," led by the Rev. A. C. Sewall, D. D., pas- 
tor of the First Reformed Church, Schenectady, N. Y. 
Addresses by 
The Rev. B. B. Loomis, '63, of Canajoharie, N. Y., representing the Methodist 

Church. 
The Rev. W. Scott, '68, Principal ©f the Connecticut Literary Institution, repre- 
senting the Baptist Church. 
The Rev. W. D. Maxon, D. D., '78, Rector of the Calvary Episcopal Church, of 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 
The Rev. Thomas E. Bliss, D. D., '48, of Denver, Colorado, representing the 

Presbyterian Church. 

The Rev. Frederick Z. Rooker, D. D., '84, Secretary to the Apostolic Delegate, 

Monsignor SatoUi, Washington, D. C. 

Hymn. 

Benediction. 



EVENING SERVICE AND BACCALAUREATE SERMON. 

First Reformed Church, 7.30 p. m. 

Baccalaureate Sermon by the Right Reverend William Croswell Doane, 

Bishop of Albany, N. Y. 



CHIEF MARSHAL, Merton R. Skinner, '95. 

Monday, June 24. 

EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE. 

MORNING SESSION. 

College Chapel, 10 o'clock. 

Subiect: " Tlie School," Melvil Dewey, Secretary of the Board of Regents of the 

University of the State of New York, presiding. 

Addresses by 

Prof. William H. Maxwell, Superintendent of Schools, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

C. F. P. Bancroft, Principal of Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. 



AFTERNOON SESSION. 

College Chapel, 2.30 o'clock. 

Subject: " The College," President Scott, of Rutgers College, presiding. 

Addresses by 

President Andrews, ot Brown University. 

President Taylor, of Vassar College 



ATHLETIC CONTEST. 

Under the direction of the Track Athletic Association. 
College Oval, 4.30 p. m. 



436 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE— Continued. 

EVENING SESSION. 

First Presbyterian Church, 8.00 o'clock. 

Subject: " The Universit3^" President Gilman, of Johns Hopkins University, 

presiding. 

Addresses by 

President G. Stanley Hall, of ..Clark University, 

Professor Hale, of Chicago University, 

Chancellor MacCracken, of the University of the City of New York. 

TUESDAY, June 25. 

ALUMNI DAY. 
ANNUAL MEETING OF THE PHI BETA KAPPA SOCIETY 

English Room, 9 a. m. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SIGMI XI SOCIETY. 
Engineering Room, 9 a. m. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE TRUSTEES. 
Philosophy Room, 10 a. m. 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE GENERAL ALUMNI 

ASSOCIATION, 

Hon. Amasa J. Parker, President, presiding. 

College Chapel, 10 a. m. 



ELECTION OF ALUMNI TRUSTEE. 12 M. 



CENTENNIAL BANQUET. 

Memorial Hall, 1.15 p. m. 

President Raymond, presiding. 

Music — By the Glee, Mandolin and Banjo Clubs. 

GREETINGS FROM 

Chancellor Anson J. Upson, of the Board of Regents of the University of the 

State of New York. 

Professor George Herbert Palmer, of Harvard University. 

President Patton, of Princeton College. 

President Andrews, of Brown University. 

Professor Henry Parks Wright, Dean of Yale College. 

Professor John Haskell Hewitt, of Williams College. 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 



Professor Charles F. Richardson, of Dartmouth College. 

Professor J. H. Van Amnnge, Dean of Columbia College. 

Professor William MacDonald, of Bowdoin College. 

Professor John Randolph Tucker, of Washington and Lee University. 

President Scott, of Rutgers College. 

Professor Oren Root, of Hamilton College. 

Professor Anson D. Morse, of Amherst College. 

Chancellor MacCracken, of the University of the City of New York. 

President Taylor, of Vassar College. 



437 



REUNION OF ALL CLASSES ABOUT THE 'OLD ELM, ' AND 
IVY EXERCISES OF THE CLASS OF 1S95. 

College Garden, 3.30 i'. jm. 



RECEPTION BY PRESIDENT AND MRS. RAYMOND. 

President's Residence, 5.00 v. m. 

COMMEMORATIVE ADDRESSES AND CENTENNIAL POEM. 

First Presbyterian Churcli, S.oo v m. 

Rev. Chas. D. No't. D. D , '54, presiding. 

Addrkssks uv 

Hon. George F. Danforth Lf.. D.. '40. 

Rev. Staley B. Rossiter, D. IX, '65 

PoK^[ HV 

William H. McElroy, LL. D., '60, 

WEDNESDAY, June 26. 

MEMORIAL DAY. 
THE COLLEGE IN PATRIOTIC SERVICE. 

College Campus, 8.30 a. m. 

Presiduig Officer. (len. Daniel Butterfield, LL. D., '49. 

I'lag-raising. with artillery salute 

Address by Major Austin A Yates, '54. 



THE COLLEGE IN PROFESSIONAL LIFE. 

Memorial Hall. 9 lo a m. 

- Presiding Othcer, W. H. H. Moore, '^4. 

Ar>i)KKssKs i!v 

Hon. J. Newton Fiern, '67. late President of the New York State Bar Association. 

Rev. Teunis S. Hamlin, D. D., '67. 

. Major John Van R Hoff, M. D., U. S. A., '71. 

29 



438 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

ALUMNI BANQUET. 

Memorial Hall, i.oo p. m. 

Hon. Amasa J. Parker, Y.3, President of the General Alumni Association, presiding 

Addresses by Alumni and others. 

Music— The Glee, Banjo and Mandolin Clubs. 



CELEBRATION OF THE SEMI-CENTENNIAL OF THE 
ENGINEERING SCHOOL OF UNION COLLEGE. 

College Chapel, 4.00 r. m. 

Presiding Officer, President Cady Staley, '65, of the Case School of 

Applied Science. 

Addresses by Hon. Warner Miller, LL. D., '60, and Gen. Roy Stone, '56. 



■ THE COLLEGE IN STATESMANSHIP AND POLITICS. 

First Presbyterian Church, 8.00 p. m. 

Presiding Officer, Hon. John Gary Evans, '83, Governor of South Carolina. 

Music— Introductory — The College Banjo and Mandolin Clubs. 

Address by Hon. Daviu C. Robinson, '65. 

Song— The College Glee Club. 

Address by Hon. Charles Emory Smith, LL. D., '61. 

Song— The College Glee Club. 

THURSDAY, June 27. 

COMMENCEMENT DAY. 
GRADUATING EXERCISES OF THE CLASS OF 1895. 

First Presbyterian Church, lo.oo a. m. 



UNIVERSITY CELEBRATION. 
REV. DR. ELIPHALET NOTT POTTER, 

President of Hobart College, President of Union College 1871-S4, Clas 
Founder of Union University, introducing. 

The Honorary Chancellor and Centennial Orator, 

RIGHT REV. HENRY C. POTTER, D. D., 

Bishop of New York. 

Music. 



CONFERRING OF DEGREES. 



HISTORY OF UNION COLLEGE. 439 

The centennial celebration served above all else to emphasize the 
exceptional part which Union College had taken in the constructive 
life of the nineteenth century. In every department of American 
interests and activities her graduates had been among the leaders. 
The array of distinguished names presented by those who spoke for 
the various professions and callings was a revelation to many, and in 
no other sphere of effort had the influence of the college been more 
pronounced than in that of the public service. 

The college began its second century under many encouraging 
conditions, and these later years have witnessed substantial progress. 
The financial situation, especially, has been cleared of all uncer- 
tainty. The burden of indebtedness which until recently threatened 
the very life of the institution, has been entirely removed, and a 
policy inaugurated which brings the expenditures each year within 
the assured income. The productive funds of the college have been 
increased by legacies aggregating $100,000, and by the sale of cer- 
tain outlying portions of the college domain in Schenectady. The 
one hundred acres that remain constitute an ample site for all 
possible future growth. A beautiful building for the use of the 
Young Men's Christian Association of the college has been erected 
by the Hon. Horace B. Silliman, LL. D., of the class of 1846. The 
South College dormitory has been practically reconstructed and 
transformed into a modern dormitory through the gifts, for the most 
part, of citizens of Schenectady. Several fraternity houses have 
been built, adding greatly to the attractiveness of the campus, and 
through the generosity of Mr. Andrew Carnegie, the central build- 
ing, known as the Nott Memorial Hall, is now being transformed 
into a library and museum. 

In addition to these material improvements, the work of instruc- 
tion .has increased greatly in efficiency, especially on the side of 
applied sciences. In 1895 an electrical engineering course was insti- 
tuted, and within the past year this has been brought into special 
prominence through the active co-operation of the General Electric 
Company, whereby a complete equipment of the electrical laboratory 
has been secured, money obtained for salaries, and the entire work of 
this department placed under the direction and supervision of Mr. 



440 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Charles P. Steininetz, the special electrician of the company, who 
has become Professor of Electrical Engineering in the college. 
Under these conditions the college is certain to take a leading place 
among the institutions offering courses of instruction in electrical 
science. But while emphasis is thus placed for the present upon its 
technical work, there is no intention of abandoning the position 
which the college has always held as an institution for classical and 
literary training. The old courses are maintained with added 
efficiency, and the technical courses are arranged so as to include 
many culture studies not usually found in these courses. 

In 1896 the question of the removal of the college to Albany 
came under discussion through the efforts of prominent Albanians to 
secure the legislation necessary to enable the city to offer a suitable 
site and $750,000 for buildings. This enabling act failed to pass the 
legislature because of political complications and the organized 
opposition of the citizens of Schenectady, and so the proposition 
never came before the board of trustees for formal consideration. It 
is not probable that the question will ever be revived. Union Col- 
lege will remain for all the future in the city which has been its 
home for more than a hundred years, and where the memories and 
traditions of its honorable past will prove an inspiration for the 
further fulfillment of its mission to America and the world. 



CHAPTER XXIX. 
The Press. 



The first printers in Schenectady were Wyckoff and Brokaw, 
about the year 1792. Their office was on the south corner of State 
and Washington streets. This firm continued until 1795, when 
Brokaw went out and Wyckoff continued the business alone. 

The first newspaper printed in Schenectady was called 

The Mohawk Mercury. It was published as early as February, 
1796, and as late as 1798. It was probably started by C. P, 



THE PRESS. 441 

Wyckoff, who published it as late as December, 1797. Some time, 
probably in 1798, Wyckoff was succeeded in his business by John L. 
Stevenson. Whether Stevenson continued to publish the Mohawk 
Mercury is not known. 

The Schenf.ctady Gazkttk bec^an to be published by J. L. 
Stevenson, January 6, 1799, on the corner of Albany (State) and 
Ferry streets, and December 20, 1802, he gave it the more compre- 
hensive name of 

The Westi-rn Spectator and Schknectady Weekly Adver- 
tiser, which was continued as late as May 23, 1807, when he 
removed his printing office to Union street, a few doors west of the 
Dutch Church, and discontinued the paper. 

The Western Budget was issued by Van Veghten & Son, at 
No. 10 Union street, the next month following the discontinuance 
of the Western Spectator. The Budget continued three years, and 
the last year was issued by Isaac Riggs, and at about the same time, 
June, 1807, Ryer S. Schermerhorn began the publication of 

The Mohawk Advertiser, and continued it at least three years, 
and was succeeded by T. Johnson, who published it for W. S. Buel, 
at his bookstore, near the corner of State and Ferry streets. Scher- 
merhorn was the first native printer, and followed his trade for many 
years. He kept a small supply of books on sale at his ofhce, and 
among publications which he issued was an edition of Smith's His- 
tory of the State of New York, with additions. 

The Western Budget was continued by Isaac Riggs until June, 
1810, when he changed the name to the 

Schenectady Cabinet. In 18 14 Isaac Stevens was associated 
with him for a short time, occupying No. 2 Cook's Row, (No. 34 
Ferry street.) Thence he removed to 23 Union street, next east 
of the Dutch Church, which he occupied until his death as a dwell- 
ing, and for many years his printing office was under the same roof. 
In 1837 he was succeeded by his son, Stephen S. Riggs, who changed 
the name of the Cabinet to 



442 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Freedom's Sentinel, under which name he continued the paper 
until January, 1843, when he resumed the former name, calling the 
paper the 

Schenectady Cabinet and Freedom's Sentinel, which name 
it bore until January i, 1850, when it was again called the Schenec- 
tady Cabinet, and until it ceased to be published January i, 1856. 

The Miscellaneous Cabinet, a weekly publication of eight 
pages, octavo, was begun in July, 1823, Isaac Riggs, printer. Its 
contents were mainly literary selections, and original productions 
written mostly by the students of the college. 

The Mohawk Sentinel was begun June 24, 1824. It was 
printed by G. Ritchie, Jr., at the sign of Fau^ and Franklin's head, 
Ferry street, and is said to have been edited by Archibald L. Linn, 
then a young lawyer of the city. This paper advocated the election 
of Mr. Crawford for the presidency. 

The Protestant Sentinel began June u, 1830, and was 
printed and published by Rev. John Maxon. It was understood 
to be the organ of the Seventh-day Baptist denomination. 

Schenectady County Whig. — This paper was commenced 
November i, 1830, at 34 Ferry street, by C. G. and S. Palmer, and 
continued till October, 1834, when the paper and all the appur- 
tenances of the printing office were sold to Nathan Stone, who, on 
the 1 8th of November, following, assigned the paper to Giles F. 
Yates, Esq. Stone was the owner of the " Schenectady Bookstore," 
on the west corner of State street and Mill Lane. He published the 
Whig, at 77 State street, for ten weeks, the last number being issued 
December 30th. Its direct descendant was 

The Reflector and Schenectady Democrat, the first number 
of which was issued January i, 1835. Mr. Yates made this a very 
entertaining family paper. During 1835-6 he published many 
valuable articles of an antiquarian and historical character. It was 
printed by Robert P. Paine, on the west corner of State street and 
Mill Lane. In July, 1835, the printing was done by Yates & Cook, 



THE PRESS. 443 

the latter being- associated with G. F. Yates. July i, 1838, E. H. 
Kincaid became proprietor of the Reflector for the next three and a 
half years, when, February 5, 1841, Abraham A. Keyser purchased 
it at the commencement of Vol. VII, and David Cady Smith was 
associated with him as editor. 

The Schenectady and Saratoga Standard was published 
about the year 1833, at 96 Washington street, by Israel Sackett, 
printer, with Thomas Jefferson Sutherland, attorney-at-law. No. 14 
Ferry street, as editor. Its principles were anti-masonic. After the 
first year the name was changed to the Saratoga and Schenectady 
Standard, and it was published in Ballston by the same printer. 

The Wreath, " devoted to polite literature," was commenced 
November 22, 1834, by William H. Burleigh, proprietor and editor, 
and Isaac Riggs, printer. It was a half-monthly of forty pages, and 
was issued about six months. During this time its name was 
changed to The Literary Journal, "a repository' of public literature 
and fine arts." It was published in Albany, Troy and Schenectady, 
and numbered consecutively with the Wreath, and continued until 
June, 1835, perhaps a little longer. The articles were chiefly original. 

The Mohawker was published by Riggs & Ncrrris in 1835. 

The Schenectady Star was published by Jesse and Daniel 
Stone, and this partnership was dissolved in October, 1835. 

The Antiquarian and General Review, a monthly magazine, 
mainly of a religious character, edited and published by Rev. Wil- 
liam Arthur, (father of President Arthur), was begun in 1845, ^^^ 
continued two years, making two thin octavo volumes. 

Freeman's Banner, a political paper, was published during the 
presidential campaign of 1848. It was the organ of the party 
known as the " Barn-burners." It was edited and joublished by 
Judge Piatt Potter. 

The Daily Ancient City was the first daily paper issued in this 
city, and commenced in 1852 by Mr. Riggs. It lived only a few 
months. 



444 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTOR\ 

The Schenkctady Democrat was begun January 3, 1854, by 
William H. Colbourne and W. N. Clark. In 1857 it was sold to 
A. J. Thompson, and in April, 1859, to Cyrus Thayer, and united 
with the Reflector, October, i860. The united paper was called 

The Schenectady Reflector and Democrat. It was pub- 
lished in 1864 at 134 State street. 

The Schenectady Evening Star. The first successful daily 
paper established in Schenectady was the Evening Star, although 
when first started it was under the name of the Morning Star. It 
was edited and published by Walter Ni. Clark and William N. Col- 
bourne. During the first year of its life, namely on September 17, 
the time of its issue was changed from morning to evening and the 
name was changed to the Evening Star. On March 5, 1857, the 
firm of Colbourne and Clark was dissolved and Mr. Colbourne took 
entire charge. Later on in the >'ear, Isaac M. Gregory, who was 
subsequently managing editor of the New York Graphic was asso- 
ciated with Colbourne in editing the paper. About the year 1861 
Colbourne sold the paper to H. L. Grose of Baliston, who conducted 
it until 1863, when it was sold to William D. Davis and Isaac M. 
Gregory. Again Mr. Gregory's connection with the paper was 
short, for during the following year he sold out his interests to 
Davis, who continued proprietor of the paper until 1865, when he 
sold out to J. J. Marlette. 

Mr. Marlette conducted the paper from 1865 until 1874, when he 
admitted his son to partnership and it was conducted by J. J. Mar- 
lette & Son from 1874 to 1876. 

Previous to 1865 the paper had been Republican in politics, but 
since that date it has been a steadfast organ of the Democratic 
party. 

In 1876 the publishing department passed into the hands of A. A. 
Marlette who had control of the paper until 1901. 

In 1880, when the Morning Gazette was discontinued, that paper 
was purchased by the proprietor of the Star, and for a time the name 
Schenectady Evening Star and Gazette assumed, but was soon 
changed back to the original name of the Schenectady Evening 



THE PRESS. 



445 



Star. On April i, 1900, the paper passed into the nianagemeiit of 
I. C. Chamberlayne. In March, 1902, the present stock company, 
the Star Printing Company, bought out Mr. Chamberhiyne, lessee. 
This company, of which John McEncroe is president, now conducts 
the paper. Mr. McEncroe is also proprietor of the Weekly Reflector. 
Edward McEncroe is editor of the Evening Star. 

Thk Schenectady Gazette. This enterprising daily was 
established in the year 1893 as an evening paper, but as there was a 
crying demand for a morning paper in the city it changed the time 
of its issue from evening to morning during the first year of its life. 

In 1899 the paper passed into the hands of Gerardus Smith, Esq., 
and it was then determined that its policy should be so just, broad 
and liberal that the public could become partners in the enterprise, 
sharing its advantages and becoming personally interested in its 
success. And the determination has been rigidly adhered to. The 
response of the people has been so general that the results far exceed 
the greatest expectations of those who formed it. 

The Gazette moved into its present quarters on March 25, 1899, 
and from that date the line which divides smaller from greater 
careers was crossed in the history of the paper. The plant- was 
fitted up with all modern improvements, including Mergenthaler 
typesetting machines and the Cox Duplex Press. 

The growth of the paper, however, soon surpassed the capacity of 
the Cox Duplex Press, and a large double press from the famous fac- 
tory of R. Hoe & Co., was installed. It is said that this press is the 
largest in any newspaper office in the state between New York and 
Rochester. 

While the Gazette is considered a family paper, it is distinctly 
Democratic in its politics. Its circulation is about 10,000. The 
growth of the paper has been at least commensurate with that of 
the city during the life of the paper, and that has been remarkable 
if not phenomenal. 

Gerardus Smith, the president and treasurer of the Daily Gazette 
Company, is a native of Schenectady, and was born in the year 1857. 
He was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy and Union College, 



446 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

after which he took up the study of law, and was admitted to the 
bar in 1879. He has held various important offices in the city, 
including that of Surrogate's Clerk and Alderman. He made a 
magnificent run for the office of Mayor in 1895, and lost by only 
a few votes. He is a Democrat in politics and has been a delegate 
to several national conventions. He takes a great interest in the 
progress of Schenectady, with which he is personally identified to a 
large extent and is president of the Schenectady Contracting Com- 
pany, trustee of the Park View Cemetery, trustee of the Schenectady 
Trust Company and a member of several of the leading clubs of the 
city, besides being prominently connected with a very enterprising 
newspaper. 

W. B. Osborne is managing editor of the Gazette. He was born 
in Buckingham County, Virginia, in 1873, and received his education 
in the public schools of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and Albany, N. Y., 
finally taking a two year's course at the Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, Troy, N. Y. His newspaper experience comprises service 
on the editorial staffs of the Times, Union, Journal, Express, Argus 
and State, (the latter now defunct) of Albany, and the Troy Record. 
He is the son of Morris B. and Elizabeth M. Osborne, and grandson 
of the late E. B. Osborne, former senator from the old fifteenth dis- 
trict (Putnam, Dutchess and Columbia counties). 

The Schenectady Republican, a weekly made out of the Eyen^- 
ing Star, was commenced in September, 1857, by William M. Col- 
bourne with Judson S. Landon as editor. 

The Schenectady Daily News was begun in April, 1859, by I. 
W. Hoffman and E. F. Loveridge, and expired Jime, 1861. 

The Railsplitter, a political weekly paper, was published a few 
months during the fall of i860. 

The Schenectady Daily Times was commenced January, 1861, 
and united with the Evening Star in June of the same year, under 
the name of the Schenectady Daily Evening Star and Times, and 
was published in 1864, by W. D. Davis and Isaac M. Gregory, at No. 
170 State street 



THE PRESS. 447 

In 1865, Mr. Davis, who was then sole proprietor, sold it to J. J. 
Marlette. 

The Dorpian was published in 1867. It was edited by A. A. 
Marlette and A. W. Kelly. Its publication was continued but a few 
months. 

The Schenectady Gazette, a weekly paper, was begun in 1869 
by W. N. Thayer. In 1872 James H. Wiseman and Harnian Sey- 
mour were the publishers. In 1874 it was purchased by G. W. Mar- 
lette and William H. L,ee. Mr. L,ee subsequently withdrew from the 
partnership. The Schenectady . Daily Gazette was started by the 
proprietor of The Weekly Gazette, January i, 1879, and ceased to 
be issued July 28, 1880, when it was sold and united with the 
Schenectady Kvening Star. 

The Locomotive Firemen Monthly Journal was first pub- 
lished in 1872 under the direction of the International Union of 
Locomotive Engineers. It was edited by Henry Hoffman until 1878 
when it was discontinued. 

The Schenectady Union was established in the fall of 1865 by 
Hon. Charles Stanford, who was at that time a candidate for re-elec- 
tion to the state Senate, and, being an enemy to the canal ring, then 
causing much talk, was taking a very active part in politics. At 
that time the Republicans of Schenectady had no newspaper. Dur- 
ing the campaign of 1864 a peculiar condition existed. The Repub- 
licans of Schenectady and the "editor of the local Democratic paper 
entered into an agreement whereby the Republicans were to have the 
use of three columns daily in the Democratic paper, for which, of 
course, they had to pay a certain amount of money. This unheard- 
of condition of things was not satisfactory to Senator Stanford, so 
he purchased a plant at Poughkeepsie and located it on the third 
floor of his building at the corner of State and Center streets in 
Schenectady. Here he established The Union as a Republican 
organ, the first issue appearing on October 28, 1865. Here The 
Union remained for a number of years. It was subsequently 
removed to the adjoining building on Center street, and from there 
to its present location in the Central Arcade. 



448 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

The first editor of The Union was A. S. Burdick, who remained 
only a short time and was succeeded by George W. Reynolds of 
Oneonta. Mr. Reynolds remained with the paper about two years 
and was succeeded by Col. Solymon G. Hamlin, who was both editor 
and business manager. Mr. Hamlin at this time held the offices of 
Postmaster and School Commissioner, and during his trips to the 
rural schools the editorial chair was filled by Major Austin A. Yates. 
Mr. Hamlin was connected with The Union for about eleven years, 
finally retiring because of ill health. He lived but a short time after 
his retirement from The Union. Welton Stanford, son of the pro- 
prietor, had acted as associate editor with ]\Ir. Hamlin for a number 
of years and he now became editor and manager. A few^ years later 
he was in turn succeeded by Omie F. Vedder, who edited and man- 
ao-ed the paper until it was purchased by John A. Sleicher of Troy, 
N. Y. The paper passed into the hands of Mr. Sleicher on its i8th 
birthday, October 28, 1883. He made many improvements in the 
office and installed Sydney W. Giles of Troy as business manager. 
Lewis C. Beattie and George W. Cottrell were members of his staff. 
Although the paper increased both in prestige and patronage under 
Mr. Sleicher, he sold out to Hon. George West in the spring of 1884 
and George W. Cottrell was placed at the head of the paper as editor 
and manager. Mr. Sleicher is now editor of Leslie's Weekly of New 
York. In 1887 William D. Davis became connected with the paper 
and soon after became business manager. He made many improve- 
ments in the office and introduced a Cox Duplex Press, the first of 
its kind in Schenectady to print from a roll of paper. Mr. Davis 
remained with The Union until July 7, 1897, when it was purchased 
by Messrs. Olin S. and James H. Callanan. This change marked a 
new era in the life of The Union. 

On May 28, 1898, Olin S. Callanan retired from The Union to 
become vice-president of the Callanan Improvement Company of 
Albany, N. Y., and James H. Callanan became sole proprietor, and 
still conducts the paper. 

The Weekly Union was established in 1866, but at the breaking 
out of the Spanish-American War in 1898, the publisher made it a 



THE PRESS. 449 

semi-weekly, which he is still issuing at the rate of the old weekly, 
namely one dollar a year. The circulation of The Daily Union is 
largely confined to the city, but the Semi-Weekly goes into the 
homes of fully four-fifths of the people of Schenectady and the bor- 
dering parts of adjoining counties. These two papers are the only 
Republican newspapers in the county and naturally are very popular 
organs, exerting great influence upon the public life of the county. 

The Union has trebled its circulation, advertising business and job 
printing patronage since the present proprietor came into possession, 
and it is now one of the best newspaper properties in the state, fully 
equipped with all modern machinery and located in a city where the 
present population is set down as 50,000, and which promises to con- 
tinue growing and advancing. 

The Daily Union is issued every evening (Sunday excepted) and 
consists of eight, ten and twelve pages of seven columns each, 
according to the advertising seasons and the amount of news. Dur- 
ing the holiday season as many as fourteen pages have been necessary 
to accommodate its news and advertising. The Semi-Weekly Union 
consists of six or eight pages of seven columns each, and is issued 
Tuesday and Friday. 

James Henry Callanan, editor and proprietor of The Schenectady 
Union, was born in South Bethlehem, Albany County, N. Y., August 
18, 1865. His parents were Henry W. and Sarah (Spaun) Callanan. 
His paternal ancestors came from Ireland, while his mother was of 
Holland descent. The members of both families fought in the 
Indian and Revolutionary Wars. His father was a farmer and mer- 
chant. James H. Callanan was educated in the public schools, at 
Pennington Seminary, New Jersey ; the University of Vermont at 
Burlington, Vt., and at the University of Rochester, being a member 
of the class of 1887 in the latter institution. He first took up the 
profession of teaching, and was principal of schools in Coxsackie, 
Callanan's Corners, Coeyman's, N. Y., and New Orleans, La. In 
February, 1892, he accepted a position on the reportorial staff of the 
Albany Evening Journal and subsequently filled every editorial 
position on that paper, including that of managing editor, and there 
he laid the foundation of a successful journalistic career, 



450 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

In July, 1897, he purchased The Schenectady Union in partner- 
ship with his brother, as has already been recorded in this article. 

Individually, as well as through the columns of The Union, Mr. 
Callanan is a strong factor in the Republican party of Schenectady 
County. He has never sought or desired any political office himself, 
yet he always takes a deep interest in all public questions, and 
especially in the success of the Republican party of which he is an 
active and influential leader. He has devoted himself to journalism, 
to the advancement of his political friends, and to the general wel. 
fare of his community. He has served as a member of the non-par- 
tisan Board of Education of Schenectady, and is a member of the 
Chi Psi college fraternity and of the Knights of Pythias. At present 
he is a member of the New York State Commission of the Louisiana 
Purchase Exposition at St. Louis. Mr. Callanan has attained a high 
reputation both as an editor and author. His editorials exhibit not 
only great force of character but also literary excellence. While 
teaching school he published a book entitled : " Practical Questions 
in United States History." He is often called upon for public 
addresses, and during political campaigns has made many important 
speeches for the Republican ticket under the auspices of the Repub- 
lican State Committee. 

On July I, 1893, ^I^- Callanan married Carrie Van Zandt Hauen- 
stein of Burlington, Vt. They have had three children : Jessie H. 
Callanan, who died August 3, 1899; Marion Spaun Callanan and 
Carolyn Callanan. 

Das Deutsche Journal was started on March 10, 1900, by M. 
Kreuzberger, who is still the sole proprietor and publisher. It is a 
weekly German paper, comprises eight pages, and is strictly indepen- 
dent in politics. In April, 1901, "The Amsterdam Deutsche 
Zeitung " was consolidated with Das Deutsche Journal. This is the 
only German paper now published between Albany and Utica, and it 
has a deservedly large circulation throughout the Mohawk valley 
A job printing office is conducted in connection with the paper 
where all kinds of book and job work, both English and German, is 
done. The paper is published at No. 314 State street, Schenectady, 
N. Y. 



THE BENCH AND BAR. 451 

CHAPTER XXX. 

Bench and Bar of Schenectady County. 

The Bar of Schenectady County was organized immediately after 
the formation of the county in March, 1809. In that year Schenec- 
tady County was erected from territory taken from the western por- 
tion of Albany County and, while the Schenectady County Bar had 
no separate existence previous to 1809, it is virtually as old as the 
Bar of Albany County. 

In this year also, the county courts were organized, under the 
constitution and laws of the state. The Court of Common Pleas, 
Court of General Sessions of the Peace, and the Surrogate's Court 
were established, and times and places were appointed for holding 
the Circuit Courts, the Courts of Oyer and Terminer and of Equity 
and Supreme Court terms. 

The judiciary of the county consisted of the Hon. Joseph C. Yates, 
appointed a justice of the Supreme Court by Governor Tompkins, a 
few weeks previous to the act establishing the county ; Hon. Gerrit 
S. Vedder, who was appointed first judge of the Court of Common 
Pleas of the county ; William J. Teller, surrogate ; Peter F. Vedder, 
clerk ; James V. S. Riley, sheriff ; James Parent, under sheriff, and 
Richard Oothout, crier of the court. 

The first court held in Schenectady County after its organization 
was a Court of General Sessions, which began on May 9, 1809. The 
court consisted of Hon. Gerret S. Vedder, first judge, and Associate 
Judges John Yates, Jonathan Herrick, Jacob R. Vrooman and Peter 
Van Slycke. 

The first Circuit Court and Court of Oyer and Terminer held in 
the county after its organization, began its session on October 23, 
1810, with Hon. Ambrose Spencer as presiding judge. Although 
this court was called a Circuit Court and Court of Oyer and Ter- 
miner, it was merely a Circuit Court without the criminal side, as no 
Court of Oyer and Terminer had been held in the county at that 
time. 



452 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Justice Ambrose Spencer, who presided at this sitting of the court 
was one of the most learned and distinguished jurists in the state or 
nation at that time. He was appointed in 1804, and served until 
1 8 19, when he was appointed Chief Justice of the state. He was the 
father of the great law\er and statesman, John C. Spencer. 

The Bar of Schenectady County has never been large, the number 
of its members being quite limited, and yet it has ever held a dis- 
tinguished position among the other counties of the state. Many 
members of the Schenectady Bar have risen to the highest rank in 
their profession ; many have been elevated to the Bench, and not a 
few to prominent civil positions in the state and nation. In the year 
1830, there were only twelve members of the Bar in this county, 
namely: Christopher Fonda, admitted in 1822 ; Joshua D. Harmon, 
admitted 1822; Samuel D. Jones, admitted 1816; Archibald L. Linn, 
admitted 1823; Alonzo C. Paige, admitted 1818; Abram Van Ingen, 
admitted 1818; Edward Yates, admitted 1818; Gilbert F. Yates, 
admitted 1822; Joseph C. Yates, admitted 1792; Henry Yates, Jr., 
admitted 1799; John B. Duane, admitted 1825, and Jacob C. Fonda, 
admitted 1826. In 1840 the membership of the Bar had increased 
to eighteen, the new members being Piatt Potter, James M. Bouck, 
John Brotherson, Stephen A. Daggett, Henry Fuller, James Fuller, 
Alexander Gibson, John Howes, S. H. Johnson, S. R. Van Ingen and 
James B. Van Voust. During this decade some of the previously 
mentioned members had died. 

In the present year, 1902, the members of the Bar of Schenectady 
are : 

Angle, Edwin C. Levis, Howard C. 

Blessmg-, Alexander T. Lomasney, R. T. 

Briggs, Walter McMillan, John J. 

Carr, James O. McShea, John 

Clute, Jacob W. Miller, John D. 

Clute, John F. Naylon, Daniel. Jr. 

Coffin, Edward R. Nolan, James J. 

Cooper, Frank Nolan, William P. 

Cooper, James C. Palmer, Charles E. 

Cooper, R. J. Paige. Douglass 





ii^iuLs-M 



THE BENCH AND BAR. 



453 



Cutler, Edward D. 
Davis, Albert G. 
DeRemer, John A. 
Dillingham, A. J. 
Fairlee, Alvah 

Featherstonhaugh, George W. 
Fenwick, Alexander 
Foley, Michael • 
Glen, Henry 
Glen, Horatio G. 
Goodrich, James A. 
Grupe, H. C. 
Hardin, Charles H. 
Hastings, Charles 
Hollister, George C. 
Hubbard, Lester 
Jackson, A. H. 
Jackson, Samuel W. 
King, Louis M. 
Kreigsman, Edward E. 
Landon, Robert J. 
Landon, Hon. Judson S. 



Parsons, Hinsdall 
Robinson, Hubbell 
Sanders, Charles P., Jr. 
Scherraerhorn, E. Nott 
Schoolcraft, J. Teller 
Smith, Davis Cady 
Smith, George H. 
Smith, Everett 
Strong, Alonzo P. 
Strong, Homer 
Strong, Marvin H. 
Van Voast, Albert B. 
Van Voast, James A. 
Van Voast, John C. 
Veddcr, Alexander M. 
Vedder, Henry S. 
Veeder, James W. 
Wemple, Alex. T. G. 
Wempl-, W. W. 
Whit my er, Edv, ard C. 
Yates. Austin A. 



Prior to 1821 justices vi^ere appointed by the Council of Appoint- 
ment. In that year a new Constitution was adopted, and they were 
afterwards appointed by the Board of Supervisors and the Court of 
Common Pleas combined. This rule continued until 1827 when the 
law was again changed, and they have since been elected by the 
people. 

The new Constitution of 1846 abrogated the Court of Common 
Pleas and substituted County Courts, the Cotinty Judge to be elected 
by the people. The first County Judge in Schenectady under this 
law was Samuel W. Jones, who was then County Jtidge under the 
old regime and who was elected under the new rule, June, 1847. 

Following are the names of the presiding judges of the Court of 
Common Pleas of the County and of the County Co^irt : Gerrit S. 
Vedder, appointed March 11, 1809; Gardner Cle/elind, May 25, 

30 



454 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

1812; David Boyd, February 5, 1823; Samuel W. Jones, January 
31, 1835; Archibald L. Linn, July 17, 1840; Samuel W. Jones, 
February 10, 1845. 

The following judges were elected under the provisions of the 
Constitution of 1846: Samuel W. Jones, elected June, 1847; 
Stephen S. Johnson, November, 1851 ; John Sanders, November, 
1855 ; Stephen H. Johnson, November, 1859 ; Judson S. Landon, 
February i, 1865, (Judge Johnson resigned and Judge Landon was 
appointed to fill his place. He served till the close of 1869, when 
"Walter T. L. Sanders, elected November, 1869, took his place); 
Austin A. Yates, November, 1873 '■> David C. Beattie, November, 
1879; David C. Beattie, November, 1885; Edward D. Cutler, 
(appointed to fill out unexpired term of Judge Beattie) elected 
November, 1890 ; Alonzo P. Strong, November, 1896 ; Alexander 
M. Vedder, November, 1902. 



District Attorneys — John K. Paige, appointed June 11, 1818 ; 
Alonzo C. Paige, September 3, 1823; Piatt Potter, January 15, 1839; 
Benjamin F. Potter, elected June, 1847 5 Samuel L. Baker, Novem- 
ber, 1850; James Fuller, appointed in place of Baker, resigned 
August 22, 1851 ; John Van Santvoort, November, 1851 ; Samuel T. 
Freeman, appointed in place of Van Santvoort, resigned, January 7, 
1856; Judson S. Landon, November, 1856; John G. McChesney, 
November, 1862 ; John L. Hill, November, 1865; Austin A. Yates, 
November, 1868; Alonzo P. Strong, December 24, 1873, in place of 
A. A. Yates, resigned; Daniel C. Beattie, November, 1874; Charles 
E. Palmer, November, 1877 ; J. Teller Schoolcraft, November, 1880 
and 1883; Alexander M. Vedder, November, 1886; Daniel Naylon, 
Jr., November, 1889; William W. Wemple, November, 1892, 1895, 
1898 ; Walter W. Briggs, November, 1901. 



Surrogates — William J. Teller, appointed May 30, 1809; Robert 
Hudson, April 6, 1813 ; William J. Teller, March 3, 1815 ; John Yates, 



THE BENCH AND BAR. 455 

February 12, 1816 ; Giles F. Yates, February 21, 182 1 ; John San- 
ders, February 13, 1840; David Cady Smith, February 13, 1844. 

Under the provisions of the Constitutional Amendment of 1846, 
the County Judge, in counties of less than 40,000 population, also 
holds office as Surrogate. In Schenectady County the offices of 
County Judge and Surrogate were held by the same man from 1 846 
down to the year 1903. With the recent rapid increase in popula- 
tion in the county, this condition changed so that a Surrogate was 
elected in November, 1902, Edward C. Whitmeyer being elected to 
to the office. 



County Clerks — Peter F. Vedder, appointed March 11, 1809; 
Joseph Shurtleff, February 26, 1810 ; P. F. Vedder, February 14, 181 1 ; 
Jellis A. F'onda, May 25, 1812 ; Joseph Shurtleff, March 12, 1813; 
Jellis A. Fonda, February 13, 1815, Jellis A. Fonda, elected Novem- 
ber, 1822 ; John S. Vrooman, appointed by Governor in 1834 ; Jona- 
than C. Burnham, elected in November, 1834; Archibald Campbell, 
November, 1837 ; Silas H. Marsh, November, 1843 '■> David P. 
Forrest, November, 1849; Marvin Strong, November, 1852; John 
W. Vedder, November, 1858; John M. Banker, appointed May i, 
1861, in place of Vedder, resigned; James G. Caw, elected Novem- 
ber, 1864 ; J. Fonda Veile, November, 1876, served by re-election 
until December 31, 1882 ; Thomas Yelverton, November, 1882 ; 
Elmer IMilmine, appointed to fill vacancy caused by death of Yelver- 
ton, 1888 ; James B. Alexander, elected 1889-1901. 

During its earlier history the Bar of Schenectady County was 
graced by some men of great ability. Some of them also adorned 
the Bench and achieved permanent distinction. To-day the personnel 
of its members will compare favorably with that of the legal frater- 
nity of any other county in the state, while some have achieved a 
distinction that will entitle them to an honored place in the annals 
of the Bench and Bar of their county, which shall be written for 
some future generation. For obvious reasons only the great 
deceased are mentioned in this chapter. 



456 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

William Kendall Fuller, popularly known in his day as 
General Fuller, was born in Schenectady, N. Y., November 24, 1792. 
He was educated in the schools of his native place and was gradu- 
ated at Union College in 1810. He studied law in the office of 
Henrv and John B. Yates, then considered the most prominent 
practitioners in Schenectady County, and was admitted to practice 
in the Supreme Court of the State in 18 14. Soon after his admis- 
sion to the bar he entered into partnership with Hon. John B. Yates, 
after which they moved to Utica, Oneida County, where they opened 
an office and practiced law until the spring of 1816, when they 
removed to Chittenango, Madison County. 

The public seems to have entertained the most perfect confidence 
in the integrity and abilities of Mr. Fuller. Soon after his settle- 
ment at Chittenango, offices came to him unsolicited, and, after hold- 
ing many minor positions, in the year 1823 ^^^ was appointed by 
Governor Yates to the position of Adjutant-General of the State of 
New York. This position he held through the regime of Governor 
Yates and for several months of the succeeding term of Governor 
Clinton. 

After leaving the office of Adjutant-General he returned to Chitte- 
nango and interested himself in the management of valuable real 
estate there. He was a commissioner under legislative acts to drain- 
the Canasagara Marsh, and was one of the directors and secretary and 
treasurer of the " Side-cut " from Chittenango to the Erie Canal. He 
died in Schenectady, March 3, 1837. 



Charles Fuller, brother of William Kendall Fuller, born April 
I, 1809, was also a lawyer, who resided and practiced in the city of 
Schenectady. Another brother, Henry F., born February 2, 181 1, 
practiced law in Schenectady for several years before removing to 
New York City, where he continued his profession throughout his 
life. 



THE BENCH AND BAR. 457 

Robert Yates was one of the first Judges of the Supreme Court 
of the State of New York, and subsequently Chief Justice. Abraham 
Yates, Jr., Mayor of Albany, and Christoplier Yates, father of Joseph 
C. Yates, were cousins, and were identified with the great movement 
which terminated in the independence of the American colonies. 
Chief Justice Abraham Yates was a member of the convention which 
adopted the Constitution of 1777. He represented New York in the 
Philadelphia Convention in 1787, and was a member of the State 
Convention called to ratify the Federal Constitution. 



Joseph C. Yates was born in Schenectady, November 9, 1768, 
and studied under the Reverend Dr. Romain and his son, Theodoric 
Frelinghuysen Romain. He then returned to Schenectady where he 
completed his education under the instruction of Rev. Alexander 
Miller and John Honey wood. Afterward he entered the office of 
Peter W. Yates, a lawyer of distinction and a leading anti-Federalist, 
of the city of Albany. In 1792 Mr. Yates was called to the Bar, and 
soon afterwards opened an office in Schenectady. He was very 
influential in founding Union College, and was one of the trustees 
named in the charter granted by the Regents of the University in 
1790. He remained a member of the Board of Trustees until the 
day of his death, and it may well be said that the earlier history of 
Union College is largely blended with that of Joseph C. Yates. In 
1806 and '07 he was a member of the State Senate from the Eastern 
District. In 1808 Mr. Yates was again ekc:ed froLn the Eastern 
District to the State Senate. Soon after his election he was 
appointed Justice of the Supreme Court of the State, which position 
he occupied until January 20, 1823, a period of fifteen years. In 
November, 1822, he was elected Governor of the State. He resigned 
his office as Justice of the Supreme Court, and on the first of January, 
1823, ^^ was inaugurated Governor of the State. Governor Yates' 
term of office expired January i, 1825, ^^^^ ^^^ ^^28 he was elected 
President of the Electoral College. Governor Yates was married 
three different times. His first wife was Mrs. Ann EHice, of Schen- 



458 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

ectady. His second wife was Maria Kane, of Albany. They had one 
daughter, who married John Keyes Paige, Mayor of Albany. His 
third wife was Ann Elizabeth DeLancy. They had two daughters. 
Mr. Yates died in vSchenectady March 19, 1837, at the age of sixty- 
nine years. 



Alonzo C. Paige, LL. p., was born in Schaghticoke, Rennselaer 
County, N. Y., in 1797. His father was Rev. Dr. Winslow Paige, a 
Presbyterian clergyUian. He entered Williams College at an early 
age and graduated before he had attained his sixteenth birthday. He 
studied law in the city of Schenectady and was admitted to the Bar 
in 1818, and opened an office in Schenectady in 1819. In 1824 ^^^ 
was appointed District Attorney, which office he held for fifteen 
years. In 1826 he was elected Member of Assembly and was 
re-elected in 1827, '28 and '29. In 1830 Chancellor Walworth 
appointed him Reporter of his court, which position he held until 1846. 
In 1838 Judge Paige was elected Trustee of Union College, which 
place he held for thirty years, and until his death. Before the 
adoption of the Constitution of 1846 Judge Paige was twice elected 
to the Senate of the State, and was made a member of the Court for 
the Correction of Errors. At the first election under the Constitution 
of 1846 he was elected a Justice of the Supreme Court. He was for 
two years a member of the Court of Appeals. In 1857 ^^ received 
the degree of LL. D. The last public position occupied by Judge 
Paige was that of a member of the Constitutional Convention of 
i867,-'68. He died in March, 1868. 



Platt P6TTER was born at Galway, Saratoga County, N. Y., 
April 6, 1800. His father, Restcome Potter, was a native of Massa- 
chusetts. During his boyhood Judge Potter attended the common, 
schools and the Academy at Schenectady, from which he was gradu- 
ated in 1824. He studied law under Hon. Alonzo C. Paige. He was 
admitted to the Bar of the Supreme Court in 1828, opened an office in 
Minaville, Montgomery County, N. Y., and continued there until 



THE BENCH AND BAR. 459 

1833, when lie moved to Schenectady and entered into partnership 
with Mr. Paige, his former preceptor. They dissolved partnership 
after a period of thirteen years. In 1830 Mr. Potter was elected 
Member of Assembly from Montgomery County. In 1836 he married 
Antoinette, daughter of Hon. Winslow Paige, D. D. From 1839 to 
1847 ^^ ^^e\d the office of District Attorney for Schenectady County 
and was at the same time Master and Examiner in Chancery, having 
been appointed in 1828. In 1857 he was elected Justice of the 
Supreme Court of New York. During this time he also served as a 
Judge of the Court of Appeals. He was re-elected in 1865 to the 
Supreme Bench of the state. In the same year Judge Potter was 
elected Trustee of Union College, which institution conferred on him, 
in 1867, the degree of LL. D. 

Judge Potter was not only an eminent jurist, but a wise and able 
statesman, and both of these qualities were evinced by him in a 
marked degree in the celebrated case of " High Breach of Privilege 
of the Honorable, the Assembly of the State of New York in the 
matter of the Honorable Henry Ray, Member of Assembly from 
Ontario." On January 20, 1870, a subpoena was issued requiring Ray 
to appear as a witness in criminal proceedings before the Grand Jury 
of Saratoga County and this subpoena was issued by order of the 
Court of which Hon. Piatt Potter was the presiding Justice. Ray 
refused to obey the subpoena and was arrested. The Assembly took 
up the matter and passed a resolution requiring Judge Potter to 
appear at the Bar of the House to be publicly censured by the 
Speaker for his high breach of the privilege of the House. Judge 
Potter obeyed the requisition, but delivered so masterly a speech on 
the case, that the House, instead of censuring him, passed a resolu- 
tion exonerating him from all blame. 

He was also a legal writer of note, and among his works should 
be mentioned Potter's Dwarris, which is an interpretation of Ameri- 
can Statutes and Constitutions, and is built upon the principles laid 
down by the English writer, Dwarris. This work was published in 
1870. In 1875 he published Potter's P^dition of John Willard's 
Equity Jurisprudence, which he had greatly enlarged. In 1870 he 



46o SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

published an original work in two volnnies, entitled : " Potter on 
Corporations." All of these works are recognized as standards. 



Alexander J. Thomson was born in the town of Niskayuna, 
Schenectady County, N. Y., in 1823, and, on his mother's side, was 
descended from the celebrated Yates family. He graduated from 
Union College in th ^ -.lass of 1848, and, having studied law during 
his college cnnr.s ■, couipleted his reading in the office of Hon. A. L. 
Linn, and \\ - ;dn'itted to practice in May, 1849. ^^r two years 
he practiced .. New York City, after which he located permanently 
in Schenectad) From 1851 to 1856 he was associated with Judge 
Linn and from i'^o to 1858 with Judge Landon. From 1858 to 
1864 he and Hon. Samuel Jackson were partners. In 1881 he 
associated James A. Van Voast with him, and this partnership con- 
tinued until 1887, after which he practiced alone until the time of his 
death, in 1901. 

He was always active in politics, although not notable as an office 
holder. He was Treasurer of the City of Schenectady in 1846 and 
'47, and was Supervisor several times. He was Police Justice from 
1868 to 1872, and received the nomination of the Democratic Party 
both for Member of Assembly and for Congress. In 1872 he was the 
nominee of his party for County Judge. From 1855 to 1858 he con- 
ducted a Democratic paper in Schenectady. 

From 1856 to 1863 he was Law Lecturer in Union College and in 
1883 gave a course of lectures on the "History of Political Parties 
Since the Foundation of the Country." 

Mr. Thomson joined the Presbyterian Church in 1847, lielped to 
establish the East Avenue Presbyterian Church, and was trustee, 
deacon and elder in that church. 



Hon. John Sanders was born in Glenville, N. Y., in 1802. He 
graduated from Union College in 1822, was admitted to the Bar in 
1825 and practiced for a year in Albany, and afterwards in North 



THE BENCH AND BAR. 461 

Hampton, Catskill and Clermont, N. Y. In 1836 he settled in 
Schenectady, and was appointed Snrrogate in 1840 by Governor 
Seward, which office he held nntil 1844. He was Connty Judge 
from 1855 lentil i860, and was the author of a history of Schen- 
ectady. 



Hon. Walter T. L. Sanders, son of Hon. John Sanders, was 
born in Catskill, N. Y., September 7, 1831, and was admitted to the 
practice of law in Schenectady in 1858. He was elected Clerk of 
the Board of Supervisors in i860, County Judge in 1870, and Member 
of Assembly in 1876. He died in March, 1901. 



CHAPTER XXXI. 
The Medical Society. 



The first medical society of the county of Schenectady was 
organized in the city of Schenectady June 11, 1810. 

The society was formed under an act passed by the legislature of 
New York, April 4, 1806, entitled "An Act to Incorporate Medical 
Societies for the Purpose of Regulating the Practice of Physic and 
Surgery." The physicians and surgeons of each county of the state 
being thus empowered to join themselves into societies, those of this 
county met on the day first above given and enacted their by-laws 
and regulations. Under such, the society was to consist of a 
" President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and not less than 
three nor more than five Censors, to be chosen by ballot, annually, at 
the anniversary meeting of the society." The President was "to 
preside at all meetings, preserve order, put all questions, declare the 
decisions of the society, and in case of an equal decision, shall have 
the casting vote ; he shall also appoint all committees, unless the 
society choose to appoint them by special resolution." 



462 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Article V provided that the " Censors shall meet whenever 
notified * * * to examine all stndents in Anatomy, Physiology, 
Surgery, Midwifery, Materia Medica, Pharmacy, Theory and Practice 
of Physic and Chemistry." Not less than three Censors to form such 
examining board. 

By Article VI, the stated meetings of the society were " to be held 
on the second Tuesday in June, September, December and March," 
at lo o'clock A. M. Special meetings could be held, though, at any 
time "when the President, at the request of two of the members, 
shall order the Secretary to send to each member a notification " 
of the intention of such meeting. Not less than five members 
constituted a quorum. A student, successful in his examinations 
before the Censors, received upon the payment of two dollars, 
and signing the declaration prescribed by the State Medical Society, 
his diploma. It cost one dollar to become a member, and the annual 
dues were two dollars, payable quarterly, and for non-attendance at 
the stated meetings a fine of one dollar was levied. 

To these by-laws and regulations the following names are signed : 
Thos. Dunlap, Daniel J. Toll, Alex. G. Fonda, Cornl Vrooman, 
Robt. M. G. Walmsley, Abraham D'Lamater, John Wood, Daniel 
McDougall, P. B. Noxon (?), J. J. Berkley, E. B. Sprague, J. W. 
Conklin, Stephen Remington, John B. Judson, Arcli'd W. Adams, 
David Low, Joseph Koon, J. C. Magoffin, John S. L. Tonelier, 
Benjamin F. Joslin, Edward H. Wheeler, Abram W. Van Woert, 
Edgar Fonda, A. J. Prime, Andrew Truax, L. Sprague, James 
Chandler, Orasmus Squire (living 1885), A. M. Vedder, Benjamin 
Weeks, John S. Crawford, N. Marselis, J. Stackpole, Edwin A. Young. 

This society held regular meetings in 1810, 181 1 and 181 2, but 
from 1812 to 1825 all records are lost, although it is presumable that 
the society was maintained during those blank years. From 1827 
until 1833 there appears to be no record of any meetings of the 
society. Of course, during these apparent interegnums, the Censors 
must have met regularly, as it was their duty to examine students 
for medical diplomas. Regular meetings were held from 1833 until 
1836, but at the meeting in the last named year there was no quorum 
present, and interest in the society seemed to be on the wane. The 



THE MEDICAL SOCIETY. 463 

regular anniversary meetings were held from 1838 to 1841. At the 
meeting in 1841 a resolution was passed to the effect that it was 
proper to charge the sum of one dollar, and not less than fifty cents, 
for visits and medicine in ordinary cases. At that meeting, also, a 
committee was appointed for the purpose of regulating the charges 
of physicians, and the President was directed to deliver an annual 
address or pay a fine of one dollar. No business of any importance 
seems to have been done in the year 1841. The officers of that year 
were directed to hold over another year, but internal dissensions had' 
destroyed the efficiency of the society, as such, and it soon ceased to 
have an existence. 

In the Daily Union of January 16, 1869, there appeared a call for 
a meeting of physicians and surgeons to organize a medical society, 
and in furtherance of this design a meeting was held January 19, at 
the Cady House. The following medical gentlemen were present : 
A. M. Vedder, L. Ellwood, J. D. Jones, Charles Hammer, N. S. 
Cheeseman, B, A. Mynderse, G. W. Van Voast, Robert F\tller, and 
William N. Duane ; and the society formed by the election of A. M. 
Vedder, President ; J. D. Jones, Vice ; L. Ellwood, Secretary ; N. S. 
Cheeseman, Treasurer and G. W. Van Voast, B. A. Mynderse and 
A. M. Vedder, Censors. 

The membership fee was fixed at two dollars, and in order to 
become a member it was decided that it would be necessary for the 
applicant to submit his diploma to the Censors for examination. 

The title of the society, as shown by its by-laws, adopted January 
II, 1870, is "The Schenectady County Medical Society." Annual 
meetings are held the second Tuesday of every January, and 
semi-annual meetings, the second Tuesday in June. From the time 
of organization up to the present the society has been in a healthy 
condition. 

The enormous strides which have been made, both in surgery and 
medicine, during the last third of a century, have naturally tended 
to produce increased activity in medical societies all over the 
country, and the Schenectady County Medical Society- has kept fully 
abreast of the times by an interchange of views and experiences 
among its active and enlightened members. 



PART II 



BIOGRAPHICAL 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



THE SPITZER FAMILY. 

Members of this family were once prominent in Schenectady, 
where the name is still honored, and where interest in the family has 
recently been revived by the erection of a handsome monument in 
Schenectady by General Ceilan M. Spitzer and Adelbert L. Spitzer, 
to the memory of the founder of the family in America, Dr. Ernestus 
de Spitzer. 

Although the older members of the family have been long dead, 
and the younger representatives are to-day identified with a neighbor- 
ing state, Schenectady was the first permanent home of the family in 
America, and not only the family name, but this city, is held in high 
regard by the living representatives of the family, as has been 
indicated by the erection of the monument referred to. The first of 
the Spitzers in this country was 

Dr. Ernestus de Spitzer, surgeon-general, who was born in 
Heilbronn, in the Kingdom of Wurtemburg, Germany, April 6, 1 709. 
He descended from the ancient Von Spitzers, a family of noble 
knights, who flourished in a town of the same name in lower 
Steiermarke, a German province, where they were enrolled among 
the nobility in the early part of the fourteenth century, having been 
allied to royalty itself. The family controlled the city government 
of Heilbronn from 1602 to 1682. His grandfather, Dr. John Von 
Spitzer, who was also an LL. D., was burgomaster of the city of 
Heilbronn for over forty years. Ernestus de Spitzer, the first of the 
family to come to America, sailed from Rotterdam, Holland, on the 
ship " Two Brothers," Thomas Arnott, captain ; and on the ship's 
list he wrote his name with a " De," the Latin for " Von." He 
landed in Philadelphia, October 13, 1747, and later settled in 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Schenectady, N. Y., where he practiced medicine and surgery for 
many years with success. Dr. Spitzer was a very important per- 
sonage in that city, being one of the first practicing physicians, and 

is mentioned in both Pearson's 
and Saunders' early history of 
that part of New York State. 
He served with distinction in 
the French and Indian War as 
surgeon, at the garrison at Os- 
wego, N. Y., from October 28, 
1753, to May 22, 1755, and later 
received an appointment as sur- 
geon-general of the Provincial 
forces. Dr. de Spitzer was mar- 
ried to Barbara Wilfelin, of 
Dutch ancestry, by whom he 
had three sons and one daughter, 
Garret, Aaron, Ernestus Jr., and 
Elizabeth. Garret and Aaron 
served in the Revolutionary 
War. Their descendants mar- 
ried into the Schermerhorn and 
Astor families. After the French and Indian War he returned to 
Schenectady and practiced his profession until his death, which 
occurred October 8, 1789. His remains were buried in the old Dutch 
cemetery in Schenectady. In 1901 his monument was restored by 
his descendants, and the names of his sons, Garret and Aaron, who 
served in the War of the Revolution, were placed upon it. 




Garret de Spitzer, physician and soldier, was born in Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., June 20, 1758, oldest son of Dr. Ernestus and Barbara 
(Wilfelin) de Spitzer. He was known as a great Indian fighter, and 
served in the War of the Revolution, after which he returned to 
Schenectady. A few years later, with his family, he removed to 
Wastina, now Rotterdam, N. Y., where he was one of the first 
practicing physicians. He was married to Annatje, daughter of 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



Nicholas and Susannah Sixbury, 
and had eight children, six sons 
and two daughters, Aaron, Nich- 
olas, Jeremiah, Peter, John, 
Joseph, Susannah and Barbara. 
Dr. Spitzer died in Rotterdam, 
N. Y,, June 2, 1801, and was 
buried in the old Dutch cemetery, 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

N1CH01.AS vSriTzKR, physician 
and stock farmer, was born in 
Schenectady, N. Y., November 
26, 1783, second son of Dr. Garret 
and Annatje (Sixbury) de vSpitzer. 
He practiced medicine in Schen- 
ectady until he was fifty-two 
years of age, when, on account 
of poor health, he gave up his 





profession, and, with his family, 
removed to Medina, Ohio, where 
he engaged in agricultural pur- 
suits and stock farming. His 
health was not improved by the 
change, and in a few years he 
retired from business, his oldest 
son, Garret, taking charge of his 
affairs until the close of his life. 
When he went to Ohio he left off 
the prefix " De " to his name, 
which was frequently done in the 
eaily years of the republic. His 
health was greatly improved 
without business cares, and he 
lived to be an old man. He was 
married to Nancy, daughter of 



SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 



Jacob and Maria (Schermerhorn) Bovee, and had four sons and five 
daughters, Garret, Aaron, Matthew, Jacob, Maria, Susan, Sallie, Sarah 
and Mary. Dr. Spitzer died at Medina, Ohio, December 6, 1868. 

Aaron BovKE Spitzer, banker and business man, was born in 
Schenectady, N. Y., October 8, 1823, second son of Nicholas and 
Nancy (Bovee) Spitzer. He was a general business man, and con- 
sidered a good judge of credit and values, and was engaged in the 
banking business for several years with his oldest son, Ceilan Mile 

Spitzer, and Ludwig Wideman. 
He was a lover of horses, owned a 
stock farm near Medina, and bred 
some very fine specimens. Mr. 
Spitzer retired from active business 
in 1886. He was married to Laura 
Maria, daughter of Joseph and 
Harriet (Draper) Perkins, and had 
:)ne son, Ceilan M. Spitzer. He 
vas married the second time to 
Vnna Maria Collins, and by this 
^* marriage had three sons, Frank 
P., Garret E., and Sidney Spitzer. 
He was a life-long Republican, 
and at the time of his death a 
member and deacon of the Con- 
gregational Church. He died in 
Medina, Ohio, May 13, 1892. 

General Ceilan Milo Spitzer, banker, was born at Batavia, 
N. Y., November 2, 1849, eldest son of Aaron Bovee and Laura Maria 
(Perkins) Spitzer, and a great-great grandson of Dr. Ernestus de 
Spitzer. Through his mother he is descended from James Draper, of 
Roxbury, Mass., and Quartermaster John Perkins, of Ipswich, Mass., 
the first of their families in America. His great grandfather, 
Nathaniel Perkins, before he was of age, was aid-de-camp to General 
George Washington. Mr. Spitzer's great-great-great-great grand- 
father, Hendricks Cornelius Van Buren, was a soldier in the Indian 




BIOGRAPHICAL. 



war of 1663, being stationed at Fort Cralo, in Papshire, and was an 
ancestor of President Martin Van Buren. He is also a descendant 
on the maternal side (being the great-great-great grandson) of Jacob 
Janse Schermerhorn, fonnder of the family bearing his name in 
America, who came from Waterland, Holland, in 1636, and settled in 
Beverswyck, in the New Netherlands, where he became a man of 
wealth and prominence nntil his death in Schenectady in 1688. 
Ceilan Milo Spitzer was educated in the schools of Medina, Ohio, 
whither his family had removed in 1851, and at Oberlin College. 
He entered upon his active business career in 1869 by purchasing a 
half interest in a drug store at 
Seville, Ohio, which he sold out 
two years later, and, with his 
father, opened the Seville Ex- 
change Bank, under the style of 
C. M. Spitzer & Co., a bankiug 
house which obtained immediate 
standing and reputation in the 
financial world. In 1877 a branch 
bank was opened at Medina, Ohio, 
and in 1878 the German- American 
Bank of Cleveland, Ohio, was 
organized, the last enterprise 
growing in such immediate favor 
that Mr. Spitzer purchased the 
interest of Ludwig Wideman, who 
had become partner, in 1873, ^"<^ 
during the next two years conducted a general banking and invest- 
ment business. In January, 1880, owing to financial depression, the 
bank failed, and soon after settled with its creditors on a forty per 
cent, basis. Ten years later, however, quite without legal or moral 
necessity, Mr. Spitzer paid all the bank's debts in full, an act which 
has deservedly given him a high reputation in the business world. 
With Ludwig and Jerome P. Wideman, he opened the bank of 
Fremont, at Fremont, Ohio, in 1880, but he sold it the following 
year, and formed the firm of Spitzer, Wideman & Co., bankers, at 




8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Toledo, Ohio. In the following year Mr. Spitzer purchased the 
interest of the Widemans, and formed a co-partnership with his cousin, 
Adelbert L. Spitzer, under the firm name of vSpitzer & Co., bankers. 
In 1887 a branch office was opened in Boston, Mass. In May, 1899, 
the Boston office was moved to 20 Nassau street, New York City. The 
firm has enjoyed a continuous and permanent increase in prosperity, 
and is now the oldest and one of the most successful investment bank- 
ing houses in the central west, buying and selling municipal bonds 
and other high-grade investment securities. Mr. Spitzer is also a stock- 
holder and director in six other banks, including the Ohio Savings 
Bank and Trust Company, and the Security Trust Company, Toledo; 
a director of the Wheeling and Lake Erie Railroad Company, and 
president of the Spitzer Building Company, which erected, in 1893, 
the modern ten-story fire-proof building in Toledo. In January, 1900, 
Governor George K. Nash appointed him quartermaster-general of 
Ohio, with rank of brigadier-general. Mr. Spitzer is one of the leading 
citizens of Ohio, and is ever ready to foster or contribute to any 
worthy artistic, business or benevolent enterprise in his adopted city. 
He has always refused to permit his name to be used for any elective 
office, preferring to exert his influence and benefit his fellow men in 
the capacity of a private citizen and a general of financial affairs. He 
is a member of the Toledo and Country Clubs, of Toledo, and the 
Middle Bass Club, of Put-in-Bay, also a member of the Ohio Society 
of New York. He has traveled widely, both in this country and 
abroad, and his Colonial home, "Innisfail," on Colli ngwood Avenue, 
is filled with numerous choice specimens of the artistic and curious 
from all parts of the world, including a fine art gallery. He was 
married in 1884 to Lilain Cortez, daughter of Alexander McDowell, 
a lineal descendant of Elizabeth, sister of William Penn, and a 
cousin of General Irvine McDowell. They have no children. 

Garret Spitzer, financier, was born in Schenectady, N. Y., 
November 7, 181 7, oldest son of Nicholas and Nancy (Bovee) Spitzer. 
He was an excellent business man, and his judgment and opinion 
were often sought on financial and business propositions. He was 
for over twenty years one of the advising directors of the Ohio 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 



Farmers' Insurance Company, and for several years was associated 
with his two sons, Adelbert L. and Amherst T. Spitzer, in the 
banking and investment business. During the Civil War he was an 
extensive shipper of grain, flour and wool, and owned a large stock 
farm south of Medina. He always . ,. 

voted the Republican ticket, and 
was a member of the Congrega- 
tional Church. He was married 
to Mary Jane, daughter of Elisha 
and Sarah (Thompson) Bra'nch, by 
whom he had three sons and five 
daughters, Amherst T., Aaron E., 
Adelbert L., Alice, Evelyn, Fran- 
celia, Luette, and Bessie Spitzer. 
Mr. Spitzer died in Medina, Ohio, 
January 3, 1891. 

The Spitzers of to day are worthy 
descendants of a name long hon- 
ored in this country. General ^<^yL.wi^>^^t^~; 
Ceilan M. Spitzer has attained dis- * 

tinction in the military and public life of the state of Ohio, and he and 
Adelbert L- Spitzer, his cousin, are prominent bankers in New York 
City and Toledo, Ohio. Carl B. Spitzer, oldest son of the latter, was a 
well-known athlete, being at the present time the holder of the 
championship record for the mile run at Yale College, where he 
graduated. In 1899 ^^ was sent to England by Yale College, with 
five others, to compete against the combined teams of Cambridge and 
Oxford. Lyman S. Spitzer, second son of Adelbert L. Spitzer, was 
also a graduate of Yale College, and edited the college paper in his 
Senior year. 

Adelbert Lorenzo Spitzer, banker, was born in Medina, Ohio, 
in 1852, youngest son of Garret and Mary Jane (Branch) Spitzer, and 
great-great grandson of Dr. Ernestus de Spitzer. On his mother's 
side he descends from James Thompson, who came from England 
with a large colony, under the lead of Governor Winthrop, landing 




SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY, 



on New England shores in June, 1630; he was one of the first 
settlers of Charlestown, Mass. He died in 1682, at the age of eighty- 
nine years. The Thompsons in England were eminent in the 
intellectual, social and religious world, a number of them being 

knighted. James Thompson, a de- 
scendant of James, the colonist, with 
four of his five sons of twenty-one 
years and upwards, signed, with 
others, a covenant, adopted July i, 
1774, to join in the defense of the 
colonies against the aggressions of 
the mother country. Two of his 
sons, John and Joseph, had already 
served in the French and Indian 
Wars ; four sons, James, Jonathan, 
John and Joseph, and eight of his 
grandsons, were in the War of the 
Revolution. Mary Hancock, the 
wife of James Thompson, was a 
cousin of John Hancock, Governor 
of Massachusetts. Another ances- 
tor, John Thompson, was one of the framers of the National Banking 
Act, and established the First National Bank of New York, the fitst 
bank that was organized in the United States under this act. He 
later established the Chase National Bank of New York City, the 
name being given in honor of Salmon P. Chase, who was Mr. 
Thompson's warm and personal friend. Mr. Spitzer, through his 
mother, is a cousin of George K. Nash, Governor of Ohio. Mr. 
Spitzer was educated in the local schools and the Lodi (Ohio) 
Academy. At the age of twenty he entered the Exchange Bank of 
Seville, Ohio, and became cashier, and in 1873, in partnership with 
his brother, Amherst T. Spitzer, he established the banking house 
of Spitzer Brothers at North Amherst, Ohio. In 1878 he purchased 
his brother's interest. The following year he was elected a director 
of the First National Bank of Oberlin, Ohio. In 1882 he sold out 
the North Amherst Bank and removed to Toledo, associating himself 




BIOGRAPHICAL. n 

with liis cousin, Ceilan M. Spitzer, in the banking and investment 
business, under the firm name of Spitzer & Co. Mr. Spitzer is a 
stockholder and director in five other banks, including the Merchants 
National Bank and Home Savings Bank in Toledo, and is secretary 
and treasurer of the Spitzer Building Company. He is a member 
of the Toledo Country and Polo Clubs, of Toledo, being president of 
the last named ; of the Middle Bass Club of Put in-Bay, and the 
Triton Fish and Game Club, of Canada. He is a well-known horse- 
man and an excellent whip. He has a large stable of horses, and 
with his four-in-hand coach, has won several blue ribbons at different 
horse shows and driving associations. In 1875 he was married to 
Sarah Elizabeth, daughter of Lynian L. Strong, a descendant of 
Caleb Strong, Governor of Massachusetts, and cousin of William 
Strong, Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. 
They have three sons and one daughter, Carl B., Lyman S., Roland 
A., and Luette Ruth Spitzer. 



Hon. Jacob Winne Clute was born in Schenectady, N. Y., 
October i, 1847, ^^^ is the son of Jacob F. and Jemima (Winne) 
Clute, and is descended from Holland-Dutch ancestry. His father 
was a native of Schenectady. Having completed his school educa- 
tion at the age of nineteen years, he began the study of law in the 
office of Judges F. B. Mitchell and D. C. Beattie. He was admitted 
to the Bar in 1868, and opened an office with Judge Mitchell on State 
street, Schenectady, subsequently forming a co-partnership with him. 
This continued until the death of Judge Mitchell, since which time 
he has practiced alone. In 1893 he was elected Mayor of the city, 
and was re-elected in 1895. Hon. Jacob W. Clute married Elizabeth 
G., daughter of Francis Van de Bogert, and they have two children, 
Earl W. and D, Vedder. Mr. Clute has long been identified with 
the progress and development of Schenectady, has been a leading 
spirit in most of its important movements, and was one of those 
through whose efforts the General Electric Company located in 
Schenectady. 



12 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

Hon. Judson Stuart Landon, LL. D., was born in Salisbury, 
Lichfield County, Connecticut, December i6, 1831. He was edu- 
cated in the common schools and in the Amenia and New York 
Conference Seminaries. In 1853 he became teacher of Latin, Mathe- 
matics and Natural Sciences in the Academy at Princetown, Schenec- 
tady County, N. Y., and, while teaching, pursued the study of law 
without an instructor. In 1854 he entered Yale College, where he 
studied law for one year. In 1855 he returned to the Academy as 
its Principal, and during the same year received the degree of Master 
of Arts from Union College. In 1856 he was admitted to the Bar, 
began the active practice of his profession, and was elected District 
Attorney, and in February, 1865, was appointed County Judge to fill 
a vacancy, and in the fall of that year was elected for a term of four 
years. In 1867 he served as a member of the State Constitutional 
Convention. In 1873 he was elected Justice of the Supreme Court 
in the Fourth Judicial District and was re-elected in 1887. During 
part of his first and second terms he served on the Appellate Division 
of the Supreme Court, and on November 28, 1891, was designated a 
member of the Second Division of the Court of Appeals by the Gov- 
ernor, and again to the Court of Appeals January i, 1900, under 
Section 7, of Article VI of the Constitution, as amended in 1899. 
On January i, 1902, he retired from the Court of Appeals upon the 
expiration of his second term of service, and is again engaged in the 
active practice of his profession. He enjoys a high reputation both 
as a jurist and a Judge, being regarded as one of the ablest Justices 
of his day. 

Judge Landon has always taken a warm interest in educational 
matters, and has been identified with Union College and the Albany 
Law School for many years. He is a member of the University 
faculty, is one "of its trustees, is a member of the Board of Governors 
and of the Finance Committee. He received the degree of LL. D. 
from Rutgers College in 1885. 



Hon. Edward D. Cutler was born at Ballston Spa, N. Y., Decem- 
ber 18, 1849, ^"d was educated in the common schools and at the Classi- 



BIOGRAPHICAL, 13 

cal Institute of Schenectady. In 1877 he entered the law office of 
Hon. Austin A, Yates, where he studied for two years, and in 1880 
graduated from the Albany Law School, after which he became a law 
partner with Judge Yates. In the fall of 1884 he received the unan- 
imous nomination of the Democratic party of Schenectady County 
for Member of Assembly and was elected by a handsome majority, 
running 625 ahead of his ticket. 



Hon. Austin A. Yates was born in Schenectady, N. Y., March 
24, 1836. After a preparatory education he entered Union College, 
and was graduated from that historic institution in 1854. He then 
took up the study of law and was admitted to the Bar in. 1857. 
Immediately after his admission he began the practice of his profes- 
sion, and was for a time editor of the Schenectady Daily News. 

During the Civil War he raised a company, of which he became 
Captain, and at the close of the war was breveted Major for merito- 
rious services. He was made assistant to the Judge Advocate Gen- 
eral in 1865, at the close of the war. He commanded the company 
which hanged the murderer of Lincoln, Company F, 14th Volunteer 
Reserves. In 1867 he was elected District Attorney of Schenectady 
and was re-elected in 1870, but resigned in 1873, on his election 
to the office of County Judge. In 1879 ^^ ^^^ appointed attor- 
ney to the Insurance Department by the State Superintendent of 
Insurance. He was Member of Assembly in 1887 ^"^ 1889. 

Upon the breaking out of the Spanish-American War, Major 
Yates went to the front for the second time, upon this occasion as 
Major in the Second Regiment, New York Volunteer Infantry and 
served until the regiment was mustered out. He was retired in 1900, 
upon his own application. He has been employed as attorney iu 
different departments of the state. 



Hon. D. C. Beattie was born in Salem, N. Y., December 2, 1827, 
and was graduated from Norwich University in 1845. He practiced 
law in Chicago from 1850 to 1859, and was located in Albany from 



14 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY 

i860 to 1862, coming to Schenectady in February of the latter year. 
Here he carried on his practice with success, and gained popularity 
so that he was elected District Attorney of Schenectady County in 
the fall of 1874, and filled that office from January i, 1875 to Decem- 
ber 31, 1878. In the fall of 1879 he was elected County Judge, and 
took office on January i, 1880. 



Hon. Samuel W. Jackson was born in the town of Palatine, 
Montgomery County, N. Y., June 28, 1821. His father, Allen H. 
Jackson, a native of the same county, was engaged in mercantile 
pursuits. He was a graduate from West Point, was by profession a 
civil engineer, and was at one time chief of the corps of engineers of 
the New York & New Haven Railroad, and subsequently the Central 
Railroad of New Jersey. The progenitor of this branch of the 
Jackson family was Colonel Samuel Jackson, an Englishman, who 
came to America about 1790 and settled at Florida, Montgomery 
County. He served honorably in the war of 181 2 and died in 1846. 
Samuel W. Jackson's mother was Diana (Paige) Jackson, sister of 
Judge Paige, of Schenectady. 

After receiving an academic education he entered the Sophomore 
class of Union College in 1840, and, after a highly creditable course, 
was graduated in 1842 with honors. 

Having begun a course in legal reading in the office of Alexander 
Sheldon previous to entering college, he resumed this study after 
graduating, and completed his legal course in the office of Paige & 
Potter in Schenectady. He was licensed as an attorney under the 
old regime in 1843 ^^^'^ ^s counsellor in 1846. Upon being admitted 
to the Bar in 1843 ^^ began the practice of his profession at Gilboa, 
Schoharie County, N. Y., and continued thus occupied until 1850, 
when failing health forced him to retire for a time from active work. 
In 1856, however, his health being re-established, he resumed his 
professional duties, practicing in New York, but in 1858 he 
returned to Schenectady, where he has' since remained, and where 
he has achieved a high reputation as a jurist. 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 15 

He was appointed by Governor Hoffman in 1867 to fill the unex- 
pired term of Jndge E. H. Rosecrans of the Supreme Court. In 
1872 he was appointed a member of the Constitutional Convention, 
and is now attorney for the New York Central Railroad for his 
locality. 

Mr. Jackson, although an octogenarian, is still actively engaged in 
the practice of his profession, and owing to his fine legal attainments 
has long enjoyed a large and desirable clientele. He is a man of 
varied acquisitions, cultured and liberal, and has been called upon 
to occupy important official positions. 



Edward E. Krkigsman, son of Arnold E. G. and Eva H. (Lucas) 
Kreigsman, was born in the city of Albany, N. Y., February 2, 1852. 
His father died in April, 1858, and he and his mother moved west to 
Ohio, and lived for a time on a farm of an uncle, near Toledo. In 
1862 he came to Schenectady, where he attended school for the fol- 
lowing two years, when, in 1864, ^^^ began the active duties of life 
by selling papers. In 1865 he entered the services of George Clair as 
paper carrier, and was one of the first to sell the Schenectady Union. 
In 1866 he entered the employ of O'Brien & Yates, cigar manufac- 
turers, with whom he remained some time. In February, 1869, he 
entered the classical department of the Union school and was gradu- 
ated in the class of 1872. He then entered Union College and was 
graduated from that time-honored institution in the class of 1876. 

Immediately after graduating Mr. Kreigsman began the study of 
law in the office of Alexander J. Thomson, and was admitted to the 
Bar in 1878. In 1881 he was appointed City Clerk, and served until 
May, 1883. In August of 1881 he formed a partnership with H. G. 
Glen in the fire insurance business, and in December, 1882, he pur- 
chased the interest of Mr. Glen and consolidated the agency of 
Schermerhorn & Company, and he is still a member of that firm. 

In addition to holding the office of City Clerk, Mr. Kreigsman has 
been Registrar of Vital Statistics and Clerk of the Board of Water 
Commissioners. In 1891 he was elected County Treasurer for a term 



i6 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

of six years, and discharged the duties of that office with such 
acceptability that he was re-elected in 1897. 

In October, 1879, Edward E. Kreigsman married Elizabeth M. 
Butler, and they have a family of four children. 

Mr. Kreigsman is a member of New Hope Lodge, No. 730, F. and 
A. M., and is highly popular with all classes because of his energy 
and enterprise and the active interest which he takes in public affairs 
and the promotion and advancement of the welfare of Schenectady. 



James A. Goodrich was born in Schenectady County, N. Y., 
November 15, 1856. After passing through the public schools he 
took a course in the Classical Institute, from which he graduated in 
1874. He then entered the Albany Business College and was gradu- 
ated therefrom in 1876. He then entered Union College, and after 
a highly creditable course was graduated with the degree of A. B. in 
the class of 1879. 

In the fall of 1879 M^- Goodrich began the study of law in the 
office of Hon. A. A. Yates, where he remained for two years, after 
which he took a course in the Albany Law School, from which he 
was graduated May 25, 1882, and two days later he was admitted to 
the Bar at the General Term at Albany, N. Y. He then returned to 
the office of Yates & Cutler for a short time, after which he opened 
an office of his own and began the practice of his profession indepen- 
dently, in which he has since been engaged with conspicuous success, 
not only building up a high reputation as an advocate and counsellor, 
but also making himself many friends as a man and a citizen. 

On February 11, 1890, James A. Goodrich married Jennie, daughter 
of Robert and Agnes (Harvey) Clemments. 

Mr. Goodrich's parents were William Luther and Mary (Walker) 
Goodrich. William Luther Goodrich was cashier, of the Schenec- 
tady Bank for many years, and was also president of this bank for a 
time. He was also accountant of the Schenectady Savings Bank and 
was engaged in the banking business altogether for a period of fifty- 
two years. Mr. Goodrich's mother, Mary Walker, was the daughter 



BIOGRAPHICAL. 17 

of James Walker, one of the leading merchants of his day in 
Schenectady. 

James A. Goodrich is a member of the Schenectady Bar Associa- 
tion, and is widely interested in church and benevolent work. He 
is a member of the First Presbyterian Church, is clerk of Session 
of that church, and is one of the trustees of the Y. M. C. A., of 
which he has been president for fourteen years, and still retains that 
office. He is also president of the Schenectady County Bible 
Society, and is Trustee of the Home for the Friendless. 



Horatio G. Glen was born in the city of Schenectady December 
26, 1859, ^"^ ^^^ educated in the public schools and the High 
school of his native city, graduating from the latter in 1877. After 
leaving the High school he entered Union College, and was graduated 
from that historic institution in the class of 188 1, with the degree of 
A, B. He then took up the study of law at the Albany Law School, 
and graduated therefrom in 1883. He was also admitted to the Bar 
in that year. Immediately after being admitted he began the 
practice of his profession in Schenectady, and has taken a prominent 
part in the Bar of the county. 

Mr. Glen is a member of the Knights of Pythias, of the Mohawk 
Golf Club, the Alpha Zeta, the Psi Upsilon and the Phi Beta Kappa 
Societies. In politics he is a Democrat, and held the office of City 
Clerk for seven years, namely, from 1885 to 1892. 

On October i, 1884, Horatio G. Glen married Laura M., daughter 
of E. W. and Rachael Moore. They have three children, Laura C, 
Horatio G. Jr., and Ethel M. Mr. Glen's parents were Henry C. and 
Agnes (Schermerhorn) Glen. His ancestors, who were of Scotch 
descent, were among the early settlers of Schenectady. 

Mr. Glen was one of the founders of the Daily Gazette, and is an 
enterprising and courteous gentleman, who takes an interest in the 
welfare and progress of Schenectady, both politically and com- 
mercially. 



i8 SCHENECTADY COUNTY: ITS HISTORY. 

William Dewar Ellis — William Dewar Ellis, son of John and 
Arminda Green (Maxon) Ellis, and a scion of one of